1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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Thread: Building a Bike

  1. #1
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    Building a Bike

    I am looking at getting a 2004 size Small Santa Cruz Blur frame and taking the parts off of a Kona Kikapu 16 inch frame. My question is: Is this a possibility or am I looking at a lot of parts not working? Are the parts on the Kona worth it? What are your thoughts?

  2. #2
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    Do you have a parts list?


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    You could be openning a can worms. If the seat tube is a diffrent diameter then you need a seat post and derailuer .The bottom bracket may not fit also. You also need to make sure that is enough steerer tube to mount the fork. New cables for the shifters might be in order .The spacing for the rear wheel might be diffrent .

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by rangeriderdave View Post
    You could be openning a can worms. If the seat tube is a diffrent diameter then you need a seat post and derailuer .The bottom bracket may not fit also. You also need to make sure that is enough steerer tube to mount the fork. New cables for the shifters might be in order .The spacing for the rear wheel might be diffrent .
    I agree with most of this except the last point. If both bikes are from the era between 1990 to 2011 then the rear wheel spacing should be the same - unless the Kona is a dedicated DH race bike (Stab's used a 150mm hub). The industry standard until lately is a 135mm hub with a quick release.
    The priority is making sure the fork will fit, it is the most expensive part other than the frame. Expect to buy a new post, probably a new front derailleur, maybe a bottom bracket if the cranks are old school square tapered axle style, Isis and current 2 piece style cranks are indifferent to 'standard' bb shell widths and use spacers to accomodate for the differences (standard here is 68 0r 73mm wide, this has changed in the last few years with the introduction of press fit BB's). One other potential issue is the brakes, I'm assuming that both bikes run disc brakes and not V-Brakes? as long as both frames run the same style you should be okay - but might have to replace the brake lines (on hydraulic discs) or the cables (cable actualted discs or V-Brakes)
    Regardless you should replace the gear cables and gear housing, things will shift better.

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    Some things will, some won't. Most of it has been pretty well covered, but you also need to pay attention to things like the amount of steerer tube left for you to work with on your fork. You may or may not have enough to swap it. You will have to measure. The amount you need will depend on the length of the head tube, the stack height of your headset, the stack height of your stem, and any spacers you need.

    Then there's fit concerns. The two bikes are going to have geometries that differ. Even if the seatpost will transfer (you would be lucky if it did), you may not want to because fit on the new frame is different, requiring a different setback on the seat. Same with the stem. You will probably need a different stem to achieve a good fit on the new frame.

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    .....won't let me post a link to the ad......It was on columbus Ohio craigslist "16 in Kona Kikapu" It is the Kona that I was talking about putting the parts on the Santa Cruz Frame. I think I will not do that idea now after what I am hearing.

    I want to keep the bike at or under 25 lbs with the santa cruz Blur 2004 frame.....if that is possible. What parts do you suggest buying for the build.....or do you suggest holding off and saving up for a brand new santa cruz all together? I was really hoping not to pay more than 1500 for the complete build.

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    I bought the santa cruz. Blur frame. But not the kona. Now I am putting together a parts list for the new frame....any suggestions to get it in the 25 lb weight limit and stay cheep?

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    Cheap, light, strong.....Pick any 2!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Caloni View Post
    I bought the santa cruz. Blur frame. But not the kona. Now I am putting together a parts list for the new frame....any suggestions to get it in the 25 lb weight limit and stay cheep?
    The three places to focus on weight: Wheels/tires, Frame, Fork. I have a spreadsheet that breaks out price per gram, and you would be surprised at some of the results. May be worth your time, and save your wallet some trauma if you did the same.

    I have a bike that I could probably get in the 19 - 20lb range, but put heavier/stronger/less expensive components on it for durability, and my wallet. As a result I now have a 23lb bike that is "worry free" monster. I like not worrying about components every-time i bash a crank, , clip my RD, Case my rim on a sharp lip, etc.... A pound or two for the sake of durability is well worth it.

    Just my 2cents
    My Bike: FORM Cycles Titanium Prevail 29er

    "Any wheel size is better than sitting at a computer all day." -Myself

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    You could get a lot of used parts. A good fork will typically be the most expensive part after the frame, but if you go used, you could probably cut the cost in 2.

    If it takes a tapered fork, Jenson has a good deal on a RS Revelation XX World Cup (Dual air) for $399 (MSRP is over $1k). They're also running a special on the SRAM X0 2x10 crankset at $179 (average price everywhere else is $400ish) and the X9 2x10 crankset for under $100!!.....actually they have a lot of holiday deals right now.

    The other option is ebay - it does take a little more work to do the research but you can get good deals off there if you take the time to look.

    Since you already bought the frame, your critical weight areas right now are the wheels, fork, and tires. A mid-priced recommendation is the Mavic Crosstrail - it weights around the same as a Crossmax at about 1/2 the price. Running tubeless will save you weight, but UST/Tubeless specific tires tend to weigh more. You may want to get regular tires and run them with Stan's spoo.

    Fork... find an air-sprung fork. Fox Float, TALAS, Rock Shox Solo Air and Dual Air models. The Revelation XX WC comes with a carbon crown and steerer and weighs 3.5 lbs (the TALAS it replaced weighs a hair under 4 lbs).

    Try as I might, I'm still hard pressed to get my own bike anywhere under 30 lbs. It's a good challenge but it will definitely eat into your budget a good bit.

    -S
    Last edited by shibiwan; 12-05-2012 at 10:14 AM.

  11. #11
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    As long as you pick a pair of decent tires you should not feel a noticeably difference between 27lb and 25 lb. It's reasonable to drop a few lbs from 30+ lbs, it just gets more and more expensive to drop weight below 27-28 lbs on the blur.

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    Hey man hope it works out well. Wanna see some photos.

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    It may be a while as it will take my husband and I a while to figure out how to build our first bike

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    Quote Originally Posted by Caloni View Post
    It may be a while as it will take my husband and I a while to figure out how to build our first bike
    Are you going to do it in a bikini? If so those bike build pictures will be very welcome.

    -S

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    If i did do it in a bikini YOU would NOT be seeing it bud.....because my husband would have your black and blue eyes swollen shut for peeping!


    Just remember.....a dog may be able to get to the fence in 2.3 seconds, but an angry husband with a gun travels much faster.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Caloni View Post
    If i did do it in a bikini YOU would NOT be seeing it bud.....because my husband would have your black and blue eyes swollen shut for peeping!


    Just remember.....a dog may be able to get to the fence in 2.3 seconds, but an angry husband with a gun travels much faster.
    LOL... all in good humor, young lady.

    I do wish you the best in your bike build. Let me know if you're looking at specific parts - I have my own parts pile that my wife has been giving me grief over (she says I have too much bike stuff in the house).

    Cheers!!

    -S

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    replacing front tube and tires

    I bought a 2003 trek 4300 from a guy. Had a bike shop check it out and all good on that end. I need to replace the tube on the front. Are their any great places to buy and should I be buying certain ones for mountain biking.

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    Quote Originally Posted by UsoSlow View Post
    I bought a 2003 trek 4300 from a guy. Had a bike shop check it out and all good on that end. I need to replace the tube on the front. Are their any great places to buy and should I be buying certain ones for mountain biking.
    If you're still looking at tubes, you have to know the size of the wheel/tire and what kind of valve it has/what kind of valve your rim takes (i.e. Presta or Schrader valve). I'd just ask that bike store what they had in stock - the tubes aren't expensive ($5-$10 depending on if it comes pre-filled with sealant). They might even change it out for you if you don't want to deal with it.

    Depending on the wheel/rim, you could also go completely tubeless and never need a tube any more, the benefit will be weight savings and less flats!

    -S

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