1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Budget build help, I already have a frame and rear shock...

    Hello Everyone,

    I've been biking all my life except for the past few years. All my bikes have been purchased off store shelves so I don't know a lot about current brands and parts so that's why I'm here.

    I recently acquired A Norco Atomic frame and a fox rear shock from my brother.

    I am looking to build a decent bike for as little cost as possible.

    What do I need for parts (I know almost everything but I have never done this before).

    I'm OK with used parts as well so I suspect ebay could be a help?

    Thanks in advance for any help,

    Mike

  2. #2
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    What type of riding are you going to be doing?

  3. #3
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    Hilly terrain mostly gravel/dirt and it's rough. That's most of the trails/back roads in my area.

    My brother did tell me he bought this to build a DH bike but he had a change in plans (baby on the way). I'm hoping I can get some use out of it.

    I won't be doing any DH riding.

  4. #4
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    If you're doing any kind of XC riding or a good amount of climbing, I'm not sure building up and Atomik would be a good idea since its a DH frame.

    This is a good read...

    Frame Geometry: Part 2 ? Trail Handling | Singletracks Mountain Bike Blog

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiiermike View Post
    Hilly terrain mostly gravel/dirt and it's rough. That's most of the trails/back roads in my area.

    My brother did tell me he bought this to build a DH bike but he had a change in plans (baby on the way). I'm hoping I can get some use out of it.

    I won't be doing any DH riding.
    That frame is not what you want then.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the response.

    So there is no way to make this frame work for the use I want?

  7. #7
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    There's always a way, but it's just not always the best way. Can you ride if, of course. Will you be tired, definately. Nothing wrong with building it up, and you'll have a fun downhill bike. However, for the stuff you described, there are better bikes out there.

  8. #8
    Rod
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    It's definitely not the right tool for the job. You could drive a nail with a rock, but a hammer will be much easier, less effort, and faster. I think that analogy applies here. It may not be that dramatic of a difference, but if I were you I would sell or trade that frame locally and get a frame designed for cross country. Good luck.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  9. #9
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    Thanks for all the help. I guess I'll keep looking

  10. #10
    Rod
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    No problem at all and I think that's the right choice. You will enjoy the sport more if you have a bike designed for what you want it to do.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  11. #11
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    Not sure which year Atomik frame you have, but you can always sell it to help fund a bike that is more suited for you. You may get around $200-300 for the frame if you find the right buyer.

  12. #12
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    Would a Norco Bushpilot be good for me?

    There is a used on for sale in my area for $350. Seller says it wasn't used much but the chain is rusted so it will need some grease or a new chain.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiiermike View Post
    Would a Norco Bushpilot be good for me?

    There is a used on for sale in my area for $350. Seller says it wasn't used much but the chain is rusted so it will need some grease or a new chain.
    It might be a good bike, but $350 is way too much.

  14. #14
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    Anytime I see a bike with a rusty chain, I know to drop their asking price by half. It was left out in the rain, which is a good indication they didn't take care of it. I bought a cheap Trek 820 for $40 sight unseen with a stuck seatpost for a friend thinking it'd be a cheap loaner bike. It took over 5 hours or solid work just getting it ridable, plus having to swap/clean parts. Just make sure you account for your time and effort fixing someone elses mess into the price.

  15. #15
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    If you end up with another bare frame, look for a build kit. Sites like pricepoint.com have them. It'll get you most of what you need in one fell swoop.

    Go through all the components in any package and make sure the way they attach to the frame will work. For example, headset standards, bottom bracket standards.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  16. #16
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    You'd probably be best buying a complete used bike. You can save quite a few $$ over building one up, and should end up with something more suited for what you plan to use if for too.
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