1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Broken Cassette - Fix It Myself?

    Hey Guys/Gals, first post on the forum and glad to be here!

    Quick question - I went riding this past weekend on my Schwinn High Timber and noticed that some of my gears stopped working... as in I would pedal, the chain would spin around the teeth of the gear but it wouldn't actually move the bike. I noticed that some of the discs on the back cassette had become lose from the middle of the back wheel and no longer moved with the wheel itself. So - I talked to Schwinn and they are sending me a replacement cassette for free (woohoo!).

    Would it be easier to take the bike up to a shop and have them put the new cassette on or is it worthwhile buying the tools and doing it myself? (from what I understand, a lockring removal tool and chainwhip tool) Would the shop charge me a lot just to put it on?

    Since I am a noob, I don't have the tools but I do believe I could figure out how to get it done if I do go out and decide to buy the tools. Please offer me your expert opinions and thank you in advance!

  2. #2
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    you can call and get some quotes. however the cost of the tools may be the same as what the shop would charge.

    But if you do it yourself, you'll be prepared and have the know how to do so if you ever have to replace another cassette or buy a new wheelset. Personally I would just buy the tools and do it myself.

  3. #3
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    A simple cassette change is fairly easy with a chain whip, cassette lock ring tool, and some instructions on how to use them.

    How exactly is it broken? Any chance we could get a video or something? This sounds... unusual.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

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