1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    9

    bringing my bike into the shop to get servied

    ok this is a pretty new guy kinda question but like I was wondering how to do this? Do I have to call ahead or do I wheel it in the shop? I just don't want to look like an idiot...Also am I supposed to clean it up for them before I bring it in there? thanks for the replies

  2. #2
    Probably drunk right now
    Reputation: Ken in KC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    6,767

    Some thoughts...

    Quote Originally Posted by phazan View Post
    ok this is a pretty new guy kinda question but like I was wondering how to do this? Do I have to call ahead or do I wheel it in the shop? I just don't want to look like an idiot...Also am I supposed to clean it up for them before I bring it in there? thanks for the replies
    Whether you call ahead or not probably depends on the shop's backlog and whether you want to leave your bike with them for X # of days. A shop will take your bike on a walk in. Most people don't call to schedule service.

    I try to clean the bike before I bring it in out of courtesy to the wrenches. Not sparkling, showroom clean but I knock the dirt/mud off the frame and wipe the drive train down. In the cases where I leave them with a dirty bike, I'll generally give them a 6-pack when I pick it up to make up for leaving them with a dirty bike.

    It's a really, really good idea to develop a great relationship with bike mechanics. Unless I'm pressed for time, I do all my own wrenching on my bikes. But I still maintain a friendship with the wrenches at my local shop. They know a lot more about fixing bikes than I do and they have small parts/fixes that they'll usually give to me when I need them.
    JPark - 3.5- don't listen to dremer

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    81
    I guess it really depends on what service you are getting done, your shop's capabilities and whether you know the prices of service. You can always call them and tell them what you have and what you are looking to get done and ask for a quote. This way you are not lugging it around.

    As for cleanliness, I wouldn't say you need to detail it but I would at least give it to them free of any major mud. 5 minutes with a hose will take care of the majority of it.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    52
    I'm fairly new but if I'm going to leave my bike on a shop I don't know, I prefer to take with me (if it has lumps of dry mud falling off I'll give it a wash) and have a chat with the staff and have a feel off the shop.

    Before hand, I would recommend asking around for reputable shops/mechanics...because sometimes they can come out worse then they were.

  5. #5
    Big Gulps, Alright!
    Reputation: Berkley's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    3,202
    Also - a good shop will give you a quote on the spot, and call you later on if the bike requires additional parts/fixes that amount to more than a few bucks.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    171
    I just bought a huge assembly of parts for my new build, and just for fun, I asked the LBS how much and expected time for them to install everything. It was something like $200 and a 4 day wait. Instead, I bought $50 worth of tools, took it all home, and had it done in 2 hours.

    So yeah, unless it is something like a professional tune up, brake bleeding, or something else that you either don't want or know how to do, pick up the tools you need and do it yourself.

    In cases that you DO take your bike in, most shops will accept a walk in bike, but if you call in and schedule a time to drop it off, they may give you higher priority, and keep your wait time down.

  7. #7
    What does a bean mean?!
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    133
    Wheeling it in - decently clean - is totally fine. In my experience, short of walking in naked, it's hard to faux pas in a bike shop; usually a pretty easy going crowd. I worked at a shop for a while and don't remember anyone calling to make an "appointment" for their bike. Being there in person with your bike allows you to show them exactly what's going on, rather than trying to describe it over the phone, and allows them to give you better time/money estimates.


    Quote Originally Posted by Ken in KC View Post
    It's a really, really good idea to develop a great relationship with bike mechanics ..... They know a lot more about fixing bikes than I do and they have small parts/fixes that they'll usually give to me when I need them.
    ^^^ Ditto this. If and when you start doing your own wrenching, definitely keep a good relationship with a shop/mechanic. They'll give you advice for bigger, more complicated stuff when you need it.

Similar Threads

  1. Bringing a bike on a plane?
    By DHKonaMTB in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: 07-25-2010, 03:47 PM
  2. Worth bringing the bike?
    By phosphor in forum Nevada
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-05-2009, 03:28 PM
  3. how to buy bike from the US and bringing it to Europe
    By stavpal in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 06-28-2005, 11:48 AM
  4. Bringing bike on airplane
    By joshua_msu in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 03-20-2004, 07:04 AM
  5. Bringing bike on airplane
    By joshua_msu in forum Passion
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 03-18-2004, 04:36 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •