1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1
    Support OUR Wounded
    Reputation: stumpy223's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    91

    Brand new 2001 Stumpjumper?

    Hello, I have been trawling these forums for about a week or so now (ever since my girl and I had a fight over my Scuba diving addiction and how she couldn't go with me, so I posted the gear on craigslist and looked for mountain bikes, cause thats a couples thing right?). Anyways I ended up buying a 2001 Stumpjumer FSR XC Comp, that had only been ridden once on the street of all places, for 680 bucks. It had two flat tires and I had to pump the shocks back up and of course the chain needs oil (not rusty just fairly dry).

    My question is do I need to do anything else (I am going to make sure all the bolts are tight before I ride as I learned that is a problem with this model bike), before I can romp on it?

    Also is there any special way to shift through gears, or is all by feel, I have owned a few multi speed bikes in my life (none in the last 6 years due to being in the military) but never really had the need to do much shifting as I use to live in a flat city, now I live in San Diego and plan on using this bike to do some light off roading for now until I get some more aggressive tires (I think my honda civic has knobbier tires than this bike, ok they aren't flat, but the treads are far between.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    94
    Look at the headset (where the bike meets the fork) and see if it's leaking grease, it may need to be repacked. Same for the wheel hubs.

    I just repacked the hubs on my 2000 Trek that only had about 200 miles on it, and they didn't look too bad inside, so it probably wasn't necessary. There wasn't much grease left in the headset when I took that apart though.

    As far as shifting:

    1. Don't shift under heavy load. Try to anticipate hills and change early. I tend to ride in a lower gear than I need.

    2. Avoid "cross chaining", where you are using the the smallest or largest chain rings in both front and back, making the chain run diagonally. When I'm riding with the front on the small chain ring, I consider shifting it up one when I'm about halfway across on the rear.

    You might find some of the seals/wipers in the shock have deteriorated over time, if it doesn't seem to be work well you might be able to get it rebuilt.

    -james
    [SIZE="1"]2000 Trek 6500 HT
    2008 Ibex Asta Comp X7 FS[/SIZE]

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •