1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Brake issue with new bike

    Hello everyone,

    I recently acquired a trek remedy 5 bike for a really good price, the bike had never been used by the previous owner, anyways straight to the issue, I had to take the wheels off the bike to get it to fit in my car, and I think during the trip the rear brake handle got pushed in. So as a result the back brake pads were closed. I removed the pads and use a 10mm wrench indicated by the manual to move the pistons back, but the pistons still seem to move back into place. Any ideas how to fix this?

  2. #2
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    Which brakes are they? Brand etc....

    You may need to bleed them if you have pushed the pistons back in and get no results.

    Anyways, I just use a coin to put between my pads when the wheel is off or you can go and buy a specialized overpriced piece of plastic from your LBS.

  3. #3
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    Post this in Brake Time with the variety of brake model.

  4. #4
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    Hydraulic disc brakes self-adjust. You need to spread the pads with something. I suspect that the adjustment you found was for adjusting reach or how soon the pads engage in normal operation.

    A bleed block is a nice tool for spreading the pads because you're very unlikely to damage the braking surfaces, while using a metal tool can chew things up. I bet your local shop has a couple kicking around. Or, figure out something with whatever you've got on hand.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  5. #5
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    The Shimano instructions say after you push the piston back, to insert a spacer or rotor and squeeze the brake lever several times. Likely this allows the fluid to drain back into the reservoir.

  6. #6
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    Got it working thanks guys, just had to push the pistons back a little further. Here is the bike, I picked it up from a seller locally for a grand. Dude bought it and never rode it, it even had the warning stickers on it still.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Brake issue with new bike-imag0024.jpg  

    Brake issue with new bike-imag0025.jpg  


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