1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
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    Bitten by the MTB Bug

    I just picked up my first bike a few weeks ago (07 Specialized Rockhopper Disc) and have become instantly hooked on the sport. I am looking for some advice regarding upgrades to my bike. The saleperson who sold me the bike said that it has outstanding upgrade potentail but didn't really elaborate. I am looking for some ideas regarding what would be best to start off with. My intial thoughts are new bars, maybe a new front derailler, tires. What would be the best way to start upgrading? I am not looking to build a $5k downhill bike, I am just looking to make a bike that is as effiecient and bulletproof as possible for a reasonable amount of money. This would be my start.

    Thanks in advance for any advice that you may have. I have spent that past couple of weeks trying to get up to speed with the technology, aftermarket brands, etc. but it can be overhelming at times. I absolutely love the sport and look forward to becoming more proficient in both riding and equipment as my experience increases.

  2. #2
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    Big stuff in order-

    Tires
    Wheelset
    Fork
    Brakes
    Cranks
    Rear derailure

    Little stuff in order-

    Stem
    Handlebars
    Seat
    Seatpost
    Pedals

    That said, you should have fun on what you have. Ride it hard till stuff breaks.
    I call for a mandate to allow only road bikes on trails to limit our speeds and increase our line picking skills-FB

  3. #3
    dcubed
    Reputation: desmo13's Avatar
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    8 months on my new mtb, beginner rider also, before i got this bike, I haven't ridden a mountain bike since 1989.
    I have upgraded nothing except what broke in a race (rear brake, new rotors)

    I have always wanted to upgrade, not sure why.. but felt compelled to want to. But in the end, when I am at the store, I turn away.

    This has been a good thing. See, just over a year ago I decided to get back in shape after 6 years of sitting on my butt since leaving the Corps. I got a road bike. rode. Joined a club. I was a roadie. And always wanted to carbon fiber this, italian that etc. Some of the club memebers also MTB'ed. They wanted me to try it, I said, "Naa, I like road riding."
    Eventually I did try it, and like you, I was hooked! So off I went and bought MTB. Good thing I had money saved and didnt spend it on upgrades for the road bike.
    Fast forward 5 months. I love MTB, my road bike is just used for endurance training. Again I keep wanting to upgrade. I race a few races, planning out what to upgrade first. Then Sea Otter. I planned on buying a lot of upgrades there. I raced my race. Walked around the expo, deciding what I want to upgrade, then I happened to go over and watch the Downhill. .... hooked...hooked on at least trying it.
    Good thing I didnt spend any money on upgrades for my XC, Now I have some decent seed money for a DH bike.

    Short version: Your just getting started. Save the money, you never know where biking may take you.
    [SIZE="1"]Delta Dirt Dogs[/SIZE]

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  4. #4
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    Thanks

    Thanks for responding to my post, I really apprecaite it. I understand both of your views and I now agree that the way to go is to ride it until something breaks and then upgrade. Thanks for helping me to screw my head back on straight. See, I spent most of my life riding dirt bikes/motocross where money buys speed and duability. I need to put those thoughts aside for the time being and just ride the bike.

    Your advice was well taken. Anyway, gotta go, it's a nice day so I better jump on and put in some trail time...

  5. #5
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by hulvhole
    See, I spent most of my life riding dirt bikes/motocross where money buys speed and duability. I need to put those thoughts aside for the time being and just ride the bike.

    Kinda cool, huh? That is one of the things I like most about the sport. Some fit kid on a $350 rockhopper has the chance to blow the doors off someone who spent $6000 on all the lastest equipment and there is nothing anyone can do about it.


    Upgrade the engine and the processor, the rest will take care of itself.
    I call for a mandate to allow only road bikes on trails to limit our speeds and increase our line picking skills-FB

  6. #6
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hulvhole
    ... I now agree that the way to go is to ride it until something breaks and then upgrade....
    That is what I was planning to say

    Obviously, if you find something about the bike that you do not like, you can start looking for options. For example, you might find that you want a different (longer/shorter) bar or a lower/higher/shorter/longer riding position; or you might want to try different pedals or tyres that are more suitable for your terrain.

    But, you have a pretty decent bike now and you need to ride it a fair bit to find out if you want to change something.

  7. #7
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    Local Advice

    Just got back from a speactacular ride. I met some local guys on one of the trails and they were really helpful and basically reiterated what everyone has been saying. They have heard of this site and some post to forums but I can't remember their user names.

    My wife now wants in on the action, any suggestions for a good bike for her? I don't want to spend a ton because I am not sure how serious she is, but it would be really cool if she came along on the rides. I remember when I bought by bike that Trek has some pretty nice bikes that were woman specific. Any opinions?

  8. #8
    dcubed
    Reputation: desmo13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hulvhole
    My wife now wants in on the action, any suggestions for a good bike for her? I don't want to spend a ton because I am not sure how serious she is, but it would be really cool if she came along on the rides. I remember when I bought by bike that Trek has some pretty nice bikes that were woman specific. Any opinions?
    I just went through this with my wife. She is pretty much non-rider, but wants to go every now and then, when we camp etc.

    I think there is only 1 rule for buying a spouse a bike. Let HER choose.. IF she gets something she likes, and is comfortable on it, she will ride it.

    I went with my wife, armed with all the newest information on WSD bikes, reviews etc. We tried all the brands All research was useless when she rode one she felt comfortable on. It could have 500 bucks, it could have been 2500, nothing would matter after that point. The bike she found was not WSD. It was orange, she hates orange but it didnt matter. Function over form..something I never expected from her......
    [SIZE="1"]Delta Dirt Dogs[/SIZE]

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by hulvhole
    I just picked up my first bike a few weeks ago (07 Specialized Rockhopper Disc) and have become instantly hooked on the sport. I am looking for some advice regarding upgrades to my bike. The saleperson who sold me the bike said that it has outstanding upgrade potentail but didn't really elaborate. I am looking for some ideas regarding what would be best to start off with. My intial thoughts are new bars, maybe a new front derailler, tires. What would be the best way to start upgrading? I am not looking to build a $5k downhill bike, I am just looking to make a bike that is as effiecient and bulletproof as possible for a reasonable amount of money. This would be my start.

    Thanks in advance for any advice that you may have. I have spent that past couple of weeks trying to get up to speed with the technology, aftermarket brands, etc. but it can be overhelming at times. I absolutely love the sport and look forward to becoming more proficient in both riding and equipment as my experience increases.
    Welcome to the forums!
    The best thing to do is just ride. After a while you'll pick up on everything.
    If any part seems to be not working or uncomfortable, then replace it. Don't replace something that doesn't need it if you have other things to replace/ work on.
    You might want to invest in a basic tool kit so you can start to learn the ropes of MTB mateneince, stuff like: allen wrenches, tire irons, tire pump, spare tube, tire patch kit, and all that basic kind of stuff.
    Well, I was just riding along when...

  10. #10
    Rod
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    My first bike a couple years ago was a Giant Yukon. (450 dollar bike) I want to spend almost every dime I get upgrading my bike since I enjoy it so much, but I don't. I can't bring myself to replace a part that is working unless I can't stand it. For me that is my tires whenever I get these worn out and my seat. They don't get traction in wet/damp conditions and my seat was uncomfortable. You can adjust your seat forward and backwards. I didn't realize this for a while and I wasn't sitting at the right place on it, which made it much more uncomfortable. Ride your bike until you find something that you can't stand about it or completely dislike. Then take that part off and replace it with a better or more comfortable part. Bottom line is to just use your best judgement and don't throw money away.

  11. #11
    I post too much.
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    Start by breaking stuff. Once it does, replace it by something better.

    One thing that can improve any bike is a better fork, better brakes, better wheelset. The rest is all up to your preference.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by EliM
    You might want to invest in a basic tool kit so you can start to learn the ropes of MTB mateneince, stuff like: allen wrenches, tire irons, tire pump, spare tube, tire patch kit, and all that basic kind of stuff.
    I bought a multi tool, some tire levers, patch kit, and a Co2 inflator, the best $75 I have ever spent since it has saved me a 4 mile walk back to the trailhead on more than one occassion. Buying some basic tools before you ride is great advice to anyone new to biking.

  13. #13
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    LOL, I am going through the exact same thing! I was showing my wife some bikes this morning and she was saying things like "Oh, that's a pretty color, I like that one". We are going to go to the LSB today and see what we can find. I guess just get her to ride a few bikes and pick the one that feels best, forget about color and graphics.

  14. #14
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by hulvhole
    I bought a multi tool, some tire levers, patch kit, and a Co2 inflator
    A mini pump could be a good idea: you might run out of CO2 cartridges (with some bad luck) but you will not run out of air.

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