1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Bike stretches me out too much

    Hi all,

    I just got a 2008 Piranha. I like how I feel on the bike, but it does stretch me out a good amount. My back and shoulders get tired way too soon. What is the best way to adjust the bike so I sit more upright?

    I thought that raising the stem would work, but all the stuff I have read online indicates that raising the stem actually stretches you out more. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    - Mike

  2. #2
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    try moving your seat forward on the rails and rotating your handlebars back to take a little off the upward sweep. a shorter stem may be in order as well dependng on what you are riding with currently.

  3. #3
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    Try to get a shorter stem.

  4. #4
    Hardbooter
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    Did you buy the bike locally? If so, take it to the store where you bought it and tell them the problem, and that you need the bike fitted properly.

    They will be able to figure out specifically what the point of interest a lot better than we will.

  5. #5
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    Many other Fisher owners have posted the same problems.

    I understand that Fisher owners are just as brand loyal and enthusiastic as other owners, but many will advise this brand without mentioning that the frame is one of the longest (in general) and may not be a good fit for everyone. A good lbs, however, should point this out to a potential buyer. Talk to the lbs owner about the problem.

    With that being said, people (in general) find that it takes a period for their bodies to get accustomed to riding. After not riding during the winter, my bike felt long for the first few rides last spring.

  6. #6
    Hardbooter
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    Since bikes have to be 4 sizes fits all (or around that number..) there's going to be a rare instance where the bike fits without the shop taking a good half hour of fitting.

    My size large Raleigh had to have the seat scooted all the way back on the rails, and the saddle flattened out (I don't know why in the world it was assembled with the nose so far down, I was slipping out of it on faster rides) and the handlebars given more forward tilt to bring my back up a little bit. Now if I could do a seated trackstand, I would sit on the bike all day it's so comfy.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkelley383
    Try to get a shorter stem.
    I've been having a similar problem as the OP with my 17.5" GF Wahoo. I have moved my seat as far forward as possible but still feel I would be more comfortable with the bars a little closer. I feel I ride with my arms too straight and my elbows almost locked. seems like I have too much weight on my hands.
    What stem would you suggest? The stock stem is the Bontrager Sport | 10d 90mm 25 deg with the Bontrager Crowbar Sport | 25mm rise Handlebar.
    Also will changing the stem effect the handling of the bike in any way. I'm really enjoying my Wahoo it's my first real bike, I just want to fine tune it.

  8. #8
    gravity fighter
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    Another Wahoo owner here that wishes he went a size smaller. I put a short stem and a set of riser bars on mine and that has helped a lot.

  9. #9
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    Be careful with your saddle adjustments.

    Saddle fore/aft adjustments should be made relative to your riding position over the crank; indiscriminately shifting the saddle to adjust cockpit length may have a dramatic impact on your pedaling efficiency and comfort.

    Generally, set your saddle height and fore/aft first, then figure out what top tube length you require to use the stem length you prefer.

    Since you've already picked a top tube length, and presumably stuck with it, you'll have to reverse these last two steps and pick a stem length that complements your top tube length.
    speedub.nate
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  10. #10
    Bushwacker
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    I had the same problem and I replaced my stem with this http://www.rei.com/product/700227?pr...:referralID=NA
    It brought my bars back, I no longer feel like I'm going to get pitched over the bars on steep decents and it allows adjustment, up or down. Rock solid so far for cross country riding that I do. I'm happy with it.
    When I'm not windsurfing, I'm mountain biking

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Starkonian
    I had the same problem and I replaced my stem with this http://www.rei.com/product/700227?pr...:referralID=NA
    It brought my bars back, I no longer feel like I'm going to get pitched over the bars on steep decents and it allows adjustment, up or down. Rock solid so far for cross country riding that I do. I'm happy with it.
    That's one option. Various combinations of shorter, higher rise stems and riser bars are another option.

    Another approach is to get a bar with more back sweep, like current offerings from Salsa and Bontrager, or go for one of the alternate handlebars like the On-One Mary, the Misfit FU or Titec's H-bar.

    The potential problem with all of these is your center of gravity. If you get your weight too far behind the front wheel, you may end up having trouble weighting your front tire for hard cornering. Again, it gets back to starting with the right top tube length. But that doesn't mean your shouldn't experiment and make the best of what you've got.

    For future reference though, have a good idea of what your ideal top tube length is next time you buy a bike. The shop really should take some responsibility for this if they indeed sold you a size too large.
    speedub.nate
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  12. #12
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    I'm no expert, but here is something you may want to check.

    Get on the bike in your riding position with your side to a mirror. Straighten your spine and make sure your arms are fairly straight with a little bend in them, but definitely not locked. Your spine angle should be about 45 degrees from vertical. If its more than that, you could get a shorter stem to shorten your reach.

  13. #13
    Rod
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speedub.Nate
    Be careful with your saddle adjustments.

    Saddle fore/aft adjustments should be made relative to your riding position over the crank; indiscriminately shifting the saddle to adjust cockpit length may have a dramatic impact on your pedaling efficiency and comfort.

    Generally, set your saddle height and fore/aft first, then figure out what top tube length you require to use the stem length you prefer.

    Since you've already picked a top tube length, and presumably stuck with it, you'll have to reverse these last two steps and pick a stem length that complements your top tube length.
    He brings up a very good point. I was in a similar situation with a 120mm 5 degree stem on my bike that made me feel a little too stretched out. I slid the seat all the way forward and it was okay for a little while, but then the back of my knees started swelling. I got a shorter stem, 105 mm 6 degree rise, off a friend and literally my next ride the swelling didn't come back.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  14. #14
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    I was in the same position as you on my trek 4300 disc, I thought my frame was to large. I went to a different LBS then where I purchased the bike and had the bike fitted for me.

    What the tech there did was Moved my seat height up a little bit. Moved my seat forward a little bit to align my knees and feet properly over the pedals.

    But I was still reaching for the handlebars. I think I had the same stem, handlebars as you did. He got me on a 80mm easton Vice stem. Same angle I believe as my previous stem -- just a little shorter. He also added a spacer underneath the stem.

    These 2 small minor adjustments completely changed my ride. My shoulder/triceps and chest do not get cramped/tired like they used and I have TONS more confidence on the trail. It feels like I have much more control and I love it.

    Keep in mind that the easton vice stem that I got is used for the bigger diameter handlebars. The bontrager that came stock in the skinnier variety. They do make a spacer that you can use to make up the difference, just so you know.

    Hope that helps,
    -Keith

    P.s. if you want a link to the stem I have -- let me know and I will find it. I am entirely to wore out from work to look for it now.

  15. #15
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    Put a shorter stem on it, I had the same issue on my bike and ever since I put a shorter stem on the problem has gone away entirely. The bike feels more nimble as well, and I have better confidence in steep descents as a shorter stem also lets you get your weight back easier.

  16. #16
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    I notice on the Fisher site that the Piranha comes with a layback seatpost. I can't get a proper fit on a bike without a straight post. Also try some shorter stems from your lbs.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  17. #17
    rebmem rbtm
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    Last edited by cobba; 07-10-2010 at 11:48 AM.

  18. #18
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    1.)Saddle should be positioned for maximal stroke efficiency, not for correcting too long a top tube. If the saddle is too forward or too far back, you'll run into knee probs, as one poster noted. KOPS (knees over pedal spindle) is yer ideal starting place. Roadies all know this.
    2.)Sounds like yer've got a bike with too long a top tube and/or too slack a seat tube angle. None of your options are...optimal. If you shorten the stem too much, you get squirrelly handling. Put an Albatross bar on it, as in the pic above, you'll sure relieve your shoulders, neck and hands, but your off road handling goes to hell.
    3.)I'd go somewhere that takes the time to fit the bike to you, rather than you to the bike.
    4.)In the mean time, by all means do try a riser stem, a more swept back bar, a zero offset seatpost (if you can't achieve KOPS with the setback post), and Ergon grips. Good luck....

  19. #19
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    Thanks for all the great advice and good ideas. I think first of all I'm going to try and switch my stem from a 90mm to a 70-80mm just to see how it feels. I'm not trying to make huge adjustments here just feel that riding with my arms bent a little more would help me be a better rider, particularly over rougher terrain. In the meantime I will try and find a lbs that is prepared to take the time to try and help me out. If they are at least prepared to try they will certainly get any future business from me.If nothing else I've learned that all lbs are not created equal. No matter either way I'm really getting lots of pleasure from riding my bike.

  20. #20
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    trade it in for a smaller size.. that will solve your problem

    The biggest issue with making a selection of bike size is that you just ride it around the parking lot and a bigger bike is fine for that, but once you hit the trail you'll have a tougher time controlling it.

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