1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    BIke Frame Cracking

    I was riding the two days ago and I jumped and got about three feet of air and the guy siad that if i keep doing that it would crack my frame. Is there any truth to this?

  2. #2
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    depends on whether u can land properly, ie gently. it also depends on the frame and how strong it is.

  3. #3
    local jackass
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    just ride it most manufactures offer a warrenty against the frame breaking
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  4. #4
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    If you're thinking about warranties, make sure you read yours. A lot of them exclude racing and jumping.

    I wouldn't worry about airing a mountain bike as long as you land cleanly, though. 3' drops to flat will probably kill your bike eventually, probably a little after they kill your wrists.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  5. #5
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    Yeah, some people like to hear themselves talk. But if you don't know how to land properly, it could become a problem. Learning to use your body to help disperse the full inertia of a landing would be useful. Consider if you jump off of something and land with your knees locked. Now think of that same jump as you would normally do it; flexing at the knees when you land. The first technique puts all of the force on your bones (bike frame), the second on your muscles (the rider).

  6. #6
    pants on head retarded
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    What bike is it?

  7. #7
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    Check the profile. I did.

  8. #8
    Hi.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigsilk
    Yeah, some people like to hear themselves talk. But if you don't know how to land properly, it could become a problem. Learning to use your body to help disperse the full inertia of a landing would be useful. Consider if you jump off of something and land with your knees locked. Now think of that same jump as you would normally do it; flexing at the knees when you land. The first technique puts all of the force on your bones (bike frame), the second on your muscles (the rider).

    You used the word "inertia" incorrectly. Inertia describes an object's resistance to change in velocity, and is based upon mass. You cannot "disperse" inertia.

    I think the word you were looking for was "energy."

    I guess some people DO like to hear themselves talk!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by biggoofy1
    just ride it most manufactures offer a warrenty against the frame breaking
    Against defects, not breaking due to overabuse.

  10. #10
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    Noted.

    Though, isn't inertia a function of kinetic energy? If I throw a ball to you, and you either catch it or otherwise redirect its trajectory, are you not dispersing its energy, or, redirecting its inertia while it loses inertia? Where does the inertia go?

    I'm not arguing; I'm asking. I can't stand the way people misuse their, there and they're.

  11. #11
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Inertia is quantifiable as the mass of an object. So you can't really gain or lose inertia, unless you count cutting off pieces of a thing.

    Momentum is quantifiable as mass * velocity. A change in momentum can be called an "impulse." If that impulse happens over a longer period of time, it takes less force to cause the same change. So frames and mountain bikers are less likely to break when the rider tries to land smoothly, stretching out the amount of time it takes for their center of mass to change direction.

    You could also use kinetic energy to describe the same phenomena, but if you hated yourself enough to try to do the math, it would be pretty ugly. In this case, we don't really care where the kinetic energy "goes," just how much force it takes.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  12. #12
    local jackass
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    Quote Originally Posted by glitz
    Against defects, not breaking due to overabuse.
    specialized will warrenty a broken frame i have seen it taken care of by my lbs ona few occasions
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