1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Bike fit questions

    So, im looking for a new mountain bike to use for XC and light AM, just small jumps and ramps here and there (less then 3-4 feet).

    I came across a motobecane fantom trail (Save up to 60% off new Mountain Bikes - MTB - 2010 Motobecane Fantom Trail) in a 22 inch frame size for 200 off list price.

    Currently i have a 20 inch frame with a similar geometry, and i ride it with about 7 inches of seatpost exposed and with a 80mm fork. I am about 6' 1" in height. Im just worried that i will have to lower the seatpost all the way down to ride anything technical or steep. And i see everyones bikes on here with about 5 or so inches of seatpost exposed and i think it would look stupid to have mine all the way down.

    Heres a pic of said bike in a 22 inch frame size for reference:


    and this video gives a good example of the trails i ride:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PHps-oubAzA



    Thank you!

  2. #2
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    A little bit of both, i just dont want to have the bike be so big that i cant lower the seat enough to tackle some of the tech terrain and jumps.

  3. #3
    AZ
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    How does the reach to the bars and eff top tube geo compare to what you ride now? How well does your current bike fit? If it fits you could possibly use a dropper seatpost on the tech.

  4. #4
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    the top tube on the bike im looking at is an inch longer then my current bike, so that shouldn't be a problem, and the stand over height is 2 inches more. my inseam is about 35 inches. current bike fits pretty well, just isnt made for what im riding

  5. #5
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    Everyone I know rides with the seat up, and then lowers it for the more technical stuff.
    The dropper post DS mentioned is a great addition.

    Choose a proper fitting bike, and worry about how others think the seat looks, by understanding that they probably don't understand why it has been lowered.

    FWIW, neither of mine can be lowered all the way, due to either a water-bottle boss, or a bend in the seat tube ... But each gets slammed as low as possible, if needed.

    5 inches of seat post ... With your inseam, you'll figure out a way to maneuver around the seat

    Nice vid BTW ... Looks fun !!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by justamember View Post
    The longer fork will sag more.
    If a spring is designed to compress 1 inch per 100 pounds, and it's rate is linear, the length of the spring determines available travel.

    A longer fork will not sag more because it is longer

  7. #7
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    A 22" frame is awful big for you. I wouldn't even consider going bigger than a 20" at your height, particularly if you're looking to leave the ground on a regular basis. I'm just about 6' and usually ride an 18".

    Speaking of - from the description, it seems that this bike isn't really meant for the type of riding it sounds like you want to do with it. Seems more of a shot at an XC race type bike (they even put "NO HUCKING" in caps). I'd venture it's probably not your best choice.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by justamember View Post
    That is a big if.

    The tolerances for that behavior become even less predictable on longer travel forks.

    My point was that making the change specifically for the benefit of a bigger fork, while compromising geometry, would be, IMO, a wash. Just get a bigger fork and a dropper post, preferably used. Problem solved.
    It simple physics, and you don't want to accept that you made an incorrect statement, but go ahead, change your intended meaning ... I mean, you did write, today, that this place is about helping beginners ... Right ?

    So ... Don't make false statements

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    A 22" frame is awful big for you. I wouldn't even consider going bigger than a 20" at your height, particularly if you're looking to leave the ground on a regular basis. I'm just about 6' and usually ride an 18".

    Speaking of - from the description, it seems that this bike isn't really meant for the type of riding it sounds like you want to do with it. Seems more of a shot at an XC race type bike (they even put "NO HUCKING" in caps). I'd venture it's probably not your best choice.
    Not always ... I'm the same height as my dad, but my legs are 2 inches longer than his.

    Back to the OP,
    You might be making a good point about style and intended use.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    A 22" frame is awful big for you. I wouldn't even consider going bigger than a 20" at your height, particularly if you're looking to leave the ground on a regular basis. I'm just about 6' and usually ride an 18".

    Speaking of - from the description, it seems that this bike isn't really meant for the type of riding it sounds like you want to do with it. Seems more of a shot at an XC race type bike (they even put "NO HUCKING" in caps). I'd venture it's probably not your best choice.
    not necessary true, every one has different legs to torso ratio. Some one with shorter legs and a longer torso that is 6' might be more comfortable on a bigger bike reaching the handle bars. where as some one with a shorter torso and longer legs might be more comfortable on a smaller bike.

    Eg. I am 5'8" and right now riding a 17" bike but it is very uncomfortable and when I save enough I will be moving to a 19". Just so I can have a more comfortable reach.

    the only way to now is to ride the bike or test ones out that are the same height and geometry.
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    the big aussie rep bomb is comin your way

  11. #11
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    I think that the amount of seatpost exposed is somewhat of an indicator of weather or not a frame is the right size and if you only have 5 inches of post showing with full leg extension on a 22 inch frame then there's a real good chance that frame is too big. I'm guessing it is.

    Don't compromise frame size in the name of a bargain.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by justamember View Post
    There are caveats to just about every point of advice in this thread, though.

    I'm 5'8" with a comparably longer torso. This bike was designed around an 80mm fork and was a pure xc race horse. It has since been converted to a an ALL-MOUNTAIN SS machine. It's a smallish frame at 16.5" (considered a medium in it's heyday), with longish top tube and a long stem, on a 120mm fork. Bigger tires were a huge improvement as well, although noticeably slower in the loose stuff.

    Oh, the POV is a fully rigid SS 29'er Redline and the rider is shorter than me by a few inches.
    Nice! Gotta love old school

  13. #13
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    I'm sure there are cases where a 22" frame is the right one for a person of pretty regular height like the OP, but for the vast majority of 6'-1" riders, buying a bike that tall would net you a poor fit. It MIGHT end up working, but the odds aren't with you. I ride with a few guys that are in the 6'4" range and the biggest any of them run is a 20" frame. At the least, see if there's a bike out there with similar geometry that you can throw a leg over before dropping the coin.

    Also as mentioned above, depending what you're riding now, maybe some changes would get it feeling like you want.

  14. #14
    AZ
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    Yep, unless the op has freakish proportions a 22" frame is probably not going to be the optimum fit.

  15. #15
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    i just dont want to have the bike be so big that i cant lower the seat enough to tackle some of the tech terrain and jumps.

  16. #16
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    Bike fit questions

    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I think that the amount of seatpost exposed is somewhat of an indicator of weather or not a frame is the right size and if you only have 5 inches of post showing with full leg extension on a 22 inch frame then there's a real good chance that frame is too big. I'm guessing it is.

    Don't compromise frame size in the name of a bargain.
    I tend to agree that the 22" frame sounds too large for you. I've been in that position, and learned from it. My first MTB was a 22" frame. I was 14 and my parents didn't want me to outgrow it. I never grew into it, and I'm 6'3" (short legs, long torso). I also had about 5" of post showing. It worked great for bike touring, but was way too big for me for trail riding.
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