1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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Thread: bike components

  1. #1
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    bike components

    Hi im still looking and learning about components I read that shimano xt chainring/gear are tall compared to sram xo is that still hold true?
    how about the elixir brakes series do they still perform poorly?
    the bikes I been looking at all seem to come with elixir brakes from x5 to x9
    what about bottom brackets are they important when considering a bike?

    cause I have in mind to buy the airborne hobglobin XO since is the bike with most XO component at the lowest price, and replace the brakes to shimano XT (it looks that everyone loves XT)
    is there any other bike similar price and good spec?

    I think it be better to get a bike with XO or XT components and just upgrade 1 or 2 parts to finish the bike than to upgrade multiples and trying selling what I wont be using.
    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Both brands release a few different versions of their crank sets. Read the spec for the bike you're considering. If the SRAM and Shimano cranks both have 22/32/44 gearing, then they both have 22/32/44 gearing. The numbers refer to the number of teeth, which has a direct relationship to the chainring's radius - if the teeth are the same, they have the same mechanical advantage as each other. So a broad statement about the brands doesn't even make sense.

    I've had Elixir 5s since 2010, and they've been great. My mechanic thinks the current-model Shimano XT (and SLX, I think?) brakes are really awesome. So if I had to buy brakes now, and it wouldn't cost me too much more, I might try them. But as it is, I'm content with my Avids.

    The bottom bracket is a cheap part. Standards are somewhat important, but I think you're not considering a bike with anything weird. So, not that big a deal.

    I think that you're letting what you can learn about a bike on the internet confuse what's important about it, though. Is this your first bike as an adult? I think there's a lot of value-added in buying locally. You can ride a few bikes, and get a sense of what you're buying. It's really all about what they feel like to ride.

    If you're set on the Hobgoblin, Godspeed. I'd just advise you not to immediately throw a bunch of money at bolting different parts to it. Just ride it for a while - you may find you're perfectly happy with the stock build.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  3. #3
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    You don't " need " xt or xo , if want them ,can afford them go for it. What you do need is a bike that fits ,that a little hard to do with online bikes. Second on what AndrwSwitch said just ride it ,whatever it is . Wear stuff out ,replace as needed.

  4. #4
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    For BB's I'm outboard/integrated/hollowtech type all the way. Outboard cups are so much stiffer
    and give more torque imo. Also very light too.

  5. #5
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    thanks I tought they came only in one gearing from what I read.
    I also being reading go try different bikes the problem is I live 4hours away from a big city with decent bike shop, is it worth to drive the 4 hours? I dont even know how is their customer service.

    I was thinking might as well get the 2nd tier group and dont look back than to get their 4 or 5 tier and then spending more on upgrades.

    but like i said im new and I want to get a good bike and enjoy the ride this would be my first Adult high performance bike.

    Airborne Bicycles. HobGoblin X0 and swap the brakes
    Hidden Peak X.0 Tech Specs | Fezzari Bikes nothing to swap all XO
    or Trek Bicycle Superfly 100 AL but then I will have to find a bike shop

    that seem to be the less expensive way to get a bike with full 2nd tier of either shimano or sram

  6. #6
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    that hollowtech is a shimano only item?

  7. #7
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    The only reason to buy a bike is that you like riding it. The parts attached to it are secondary. Buy whatever you like, it doesn't matter why you like it most.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  8. #8
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    IMO, there's a big change in Shimano from Alivio to Deore. SLX is a little prettier than Deore and weighs a bit less, but I think that actual functional changes are pretty far into diminishing returns at that point.

    Hollowtech II is a trademark. IIRC, it refers to all of Shimano's external bottom bracket systems. Hollowtech referred to their cranks with hollow crank arms. Neither is exclusive to Shimano, although I do like their crank design a bit better than the others. And, double-check me on this because I find the issue of what, exactly, "Hollowtech" refers to a bit confusing.

    I still think you're too worried about the components, and the details of the components. At the tier you're looking at, you're not getting any sub-par parts - everything should work, and work well. While we have our preferences, I think I could be happy on either SRAM or Shimano, and with either brand's brakes, and with a variety of mid- and higher-end forks, wheels, different pedal systems, etc.

    In other words, choose the bike that looks like the most fun to you. Ride it totally stock for the first month or so - don't even change the stem or the saddle. Then think about fit, tires and pedals. You really shouldn't need to change any of the larger-ticket hardware this year.

    Riding the wrong size bike is a bummer. So depending on how often you go into the city, maybe riding some bikes is something that makes sense to fit into your next trip.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  9. #9
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    You're making a start, but you have more of the learning curve to get through.
    The components you are zeroing in on are less important than handling/weight/geo, fork /shock, wheels/tires and brakes(SLX are the same as XT).
    Basically fifth on the list.
    $3-4k could get you a nice crank, cluster and derailleurs on a bike that steers slow or twitchy, doesn't handle bumps and may not fit.
    It would also help if you could give so info on your local trails.

  10. #10
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    You won't need to swap the Avid 9's on the airborn. They're as good as they get, only without
    the carbon fiber.

  11. #11
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    If you're four hours away from a bike shop, it depends on your mechanical abilities whether it is worth it or not.

    Is there a bike club in your area?
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  12. #12
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    sorry for late reply
    all you guys now make me think if I should or not get a good comp spec bike online or go to a bike shop. but for some reason I dont like the idea of dealing with a bike shop.

    I tough everyone soon or later upgrade to atleast the second tier group so why not start from there was my line of thinking

    no bike club in my area only the casual tourist that come here to the Nat Park to ride.

    is alot more than just the group I dint even think about that. but Im definitely not going to be trying for any kind of race just recreational ride with the wife and kid.

  13. #13
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I've left my mountain bike with a mix of mid-range parts. They do the job and I'd rather spend the money on other things. It works great. My road bike has stayed mostly 105 for over ten years, although it does have Ultegra shifters. My 'cross bike has Tiagra, and when I replace things, I try to stay around that pricepoint - I break stuff on it way too often to bolt anything nicer to it. I've actually been downgrading as I replace parts on my commuter - it was pretty close to the right bike to begin with and I got a good price on it, but I'm not willing to spend the money to keep it at that level.

    So no, "everyone" doesn't sooner or later upgrade to the 2nd-tier stuff. I think that bike forums have a much higher representation from people who want the shiny bits for their own sake. Which is fine if it makes you happy, but if it's just about riding, you really don't need it.

    For casual riding, you don't need much at all. But mountain biking is tons of fun, so it would be a pity to buy something cheap and basic enough to truly get in the way if you and your family start taking on more challenging trails.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  14. #14
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    I've been trying to figure out a good algorithm for buying a bike - something like "spend a dollar for every mile you plan to ride off road in the first year" or something like that. I think it's pretty close, but let me check with the other beers.

    Like Switch, I've got a 14 year old bike with "lower spec" components on it that has thousands of miles. Most of the mid-grade stuff of today was the top tier stuff 10 years ago.

    If you're just recreational trail riding with the wife and kids, a $700-$1,000 bike will be more than sufficient and should last for years.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmac View Post
    I've been trying to figure out a good algorithm for buying a bike - something like "spend a dollar for every mile you plan to ride off road in the first year" or something like that. I think it's pretty close, but let me check with the other beers.

    Like Switch, I've got a 14 year old bike with "lower spec" components on it that has thousands of miles. Most of the mid-grade stuff of today was the top tier stuff 10 years ago.

    If you're just recreational trail riding with the wife and kids, a $700-$1,000 bike will be more than sufficient and should last for years.
    I would agree with everything you said here.

    I got my first new trail bike at the beginning of last year for just under $1,000.00, and I put about 1000 miles on it. The bike is still as good as new.

    I also have a 20+ year old bike converted to a single speed that is every bit as fun and reliable as my new bike.

    Both bikes are/were mid-range for their time, and if I do the required maintenance on them they should both last me several thousand more miles of fun. In my opinion, you don't need to break the bank to have a reliable bike that's fun to ride.

  16. #16
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    Give that "almost" LBS a call, and find out what bikes they offer in your price range. Then, do your research on what they have; you may actually get more for your $$ that way. Plus, you won't have to put it together/adjust everything like on an internet purchase.

  17. #17
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    I know Jenson has a service where they will assemble and adjust a bike, then do minor disassesembly for packing and will ship it to you. Then, you just need to do some minor assembly and you're off!
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  18. #18
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    yes I think I been over thinking this to much and just like my other hobby, I alway buy the high end stuff and then regret not getting the lower spec one.
    I just tough that for a MTB it would be better to buy high spec and dont look back. but like I said I wont be competing.
    I been reading to much on here and mostly everyone compete local or something like that.
    I just wanted to reward myself with a nice bike. Is been on my wish list for a while now.
    Thanks!

  19. #19
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    These are all good bikes: First time going clipless
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

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