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  1. #1
    Ilsa
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    Bike build sequence

    I'm new to all this craziness, however I'm fairly mechanically inclined. I just bought an older early '90's aluminum frame and was wondering, is there a recommended process to follow in building it up?

    I realize you don't need to follow a certain order, but I'm a newbe and would like to see how it's done the tried and true way first. Thanks.

  2. #2
    AZ
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    There is a stickie at the top of the tool forum on this very subject .

  3. #3
    Ilsa
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    Where?

  4. #4
    AZ
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    tool forum , at the top .

  5. #5
    Ilsa
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    Ok. Finally found it in stickied in the Tool forum. That's kind of a marathon read about how to put a bike together, to include what to eat for lunch and who to invite over. I was looking for more of a step 1 - 10, if it exists. If it doesn't exist, that's fine. It's not like it's a complex 3000 lb car.

  6. #6
    i also unicycle
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    install a part that can/needs to be installed first, ie, install the bottom bracket before the cranks, and the headset before the fork and stem. i like to get frame, seatpost and clamp, headset, fork, bb and cranks in first, then derailleurs, bars/shifters, wheels, brakes, chain, and all the finishing touches, tubes, tires, grips etc.

    there's really not a wrong way to do it, as long as everything's on there and works.
    mtbr says you should know: i work in a bike shop.
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  7. #7
    mbtr member
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    I like to start at the back and work my way forward. Installing cassettes and adjusting rear brakes is tedious, mounting up cranks is kinda cool, but by the time i'm pounding on a crown race and running shift cables i'm so excited that i'm shaking with glee and just wanna noodle around the parking lot NOW!

    God trimming steer tubes is a rush.
    "Things that are complex are not useful, Things that are useful are simple."
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  8. #8
    mtbr member
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    I'm in the process of building my first bike. Obviously I started with choosing what frame I want to run. Then a corresponding fork.

    I spent some time last week and I build a rear wheel. I may just order a front. I have a donar 90s vintage Stumpjumper that I'll strip the rear derailuer and cassette from.

    Once the frame gets in, I'll probably swing by my LBS and see if I need to face the head tube and BB. Probably pick up a headset and possibly a single ring crank from them. Plus cables and housing.

    But I have no clue where I'm gonna pick up brakes.

    But I figure I'll just slowly work on stuff that may need special tools with my LBS. Then just put the easy stuff on afterwards in some logical manner as to not have to remove something in order to put the next part on...I think...

    Whatever...it's a hobby, right?
    Just get out and ride!

  9. #9
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    It's actually quite simple....

    if you think about it. Install the components that are required to be in place before other components can be installed.

    The biggies are, seat post and clamp (must be installed so you can put the bike in the workstand, if you are using one), headset (must be installed before you can install the fork), bottom bracket (must be installed before you can install the cranks), stem (must be installed at the time you install the fork and is required to install the bars), and so on.

    There's no set in stone order to it really. The first components that I install on a frame up build are, seat post and clamp, headset, bottom bracket and cranks, then the fork stem and bar. then the wheels (rear with cassette installed). Everything else on the bike is either attached to, or interacts with one or more of the above and it is required that they be in place for proper intallation of the rest of the components.

    So just think about it. There's no partcular order that the above components absolutely have to be installed in, but it does help to have them all in place at the beginning.

    If I had to go 1 - 10 etc., it would be:

    1. Seat post and clamp (you can install the saddle as well if you want at this time, I usually wait till the bike is out of the stand to set the initial adjustment fore and aft and tilt, it's easier with the bike on the floor)
    2. Headset
    3. Fork and stem
    4. Bars
    5. Bottom bracket and crankset
    6. Wheels and cassette (tires along with them)
    7. Derailleurs (front and rear)
    8. Shifters, brake levers, and grips (arbitrary, you can install these at the same time you install the bars if you like, but if the calbles are pre installed they get in the way.)
    9. Chain (8 and 9 are interchangable no biggy)
    10. Brakes
    11. Cables and housing

    From there it's simply a matter of hooking up cables, set up, and making adjustments to the individual components.

    Have fun!

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  10. #10
    Ilsa
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    Great advice guys. That 1 - 10 makes sense.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
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    Here is a little more detail, but not over the top:
    http://docs.google.com/View?id=dd8hnbfj_55dvvr9mxc

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