1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    19

    Bike Brand/Model

    Hello Can someone help me Id the make and model of this bike.I have tried searching for it on google by the parts that are on it and the Vin code on the bottom where the pedals are located but I cant seem to come up with anything.
    Vin on Bottom of bike is snhua08c45188 if that helps any
    Maybe point me in the right direction of what you think it might me


    [/IMG]

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    19
    If my pic doesn't work then here is pics on this link ID FS Bike - Pinkbike Forum

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    19




    I don't know much about Mt bike the shitty rear shock on it can that be replaced with a Fox Float. I believe the shock on it now is from eBay has stupid amounts of sag

  4. #4

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    225
    Looks like Motobecane or something similar
    Hammerheadbikes.com

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    19
    Thank you cobba for finding that for me

  7. #7
    CSC
    CSC is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    255
    Not sure if a Float would fit in the space provided...

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    81
    Hey I saw that bike for sale on craigslist! lol. Looks like it could be an okay starter bike with a little changing of stuff.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    19
    Yea I was Thinking about getting a new rear shock for it and just running the dart 1 till I can get enough money for a manitou match or minute

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,636
    Don't bother with replacing the shock,ride it til it breaks . Replace the bike.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by rangeriderdave View Post
    Don't bother with replacing the shock,ride it til it breaks . Replace the bike.
    I will be happy to take the cash off your hand so I can buy a nice FS right now. But I'm just getting into the sport I rather not go spend $2k+

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Highwaystreets's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    377
    Quote Originally Posted by Hinrichs3 View Post
    I will be happy to take the cash off your hand so I can buy a nice FS right now. But I'm just getting into the sport I rather not go spend $2k+
    I know it may have sounded like an "elitist" opinion however he is correct in his statement. Ride the bike until it dies and only replace items as they break as opposed to upgrading. That bike is not worth investing heavily in but it should be good enough to get you on the trail. Save up your $$ so down the line you can upgrade to something of higher quality.
    Current Rides:
    2011 Trek Remedy 8

    To Get Me There:
    2012 Ford F150 Ecoboost

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    19
    Yea I fully understand where the both of you are coming from and I'm not going to tell you your wron or try to even fight like this bike is worth a damn other then teaching me the basics of riding a mt bike which is a lot different the bmx that I used to do along time ago. I look at it this way your not going to put someone in the seat of a Formula 1 car and tell them to go race they might know how to drive the car but they won't use the full potential of the cars suspension and power to make it even worth it to them. So that's why I feel like what's the pOint in spending the money to buy a bike I even know how to ride its full potential or even know the difference.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Highwaystreets's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    377
    yep thats a solid idea. Just don't fall in the trap that many do and upgrade the hell out of a bike thats not worth it. In the end you will never get your money back. Buy the bike and enjoy it, get out and ride!
    Current Rides:
    2011 Trek Remedy 8

    To Get Me There:
    2012 Ford F150 Ecoboost

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    12
    just ride with reason easier said than done though....Personally I would ride it like I stole it

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    19
    Hahaha yea I wonder what will go first if/when it does break

  17. #17
    local bike dr.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    112
    We have 3 department store mountain bikes atm, they still get down the road, but...
    Lower pistons of the forks are falling apart = excessive play = strain on the headset.
    Vbrakes are twisting when applying the brakes = uneven wear on pads = brake fade
    Rear axle and crank axles are both bent, but not to the point of missing shifts or breaking (yet)
    Front shifters are broken on 2 of the 3 (cheap gripshift style)
    Rear derailleur has broken on one bike ($20 part), with another about to give out.

    These bikes work fine the first season, minor issues after 2 seasons, and component failures during or after the third season. One of the three bikes has made it thru 6 seasons, but not much original equipment on it (no rear brakes, no front shifter/derailleur, etc.). I'd say we spent about $60 in parts on each after 2 seasons, but your replacing as much in parts as you paid for the bike after 3 or 4 years.
    Bottom line, the cheaply made department store bikes worked fine while the kids were growing up, lasting about as long as they were appropriately sized, but once they are in high school, you'll end up saving money buying a quality bike, and buying the frame "one size up" so they don't outgrow it in a year. If you are done growing and looking to step up your riding, then I'd just save up and buy an "entry level" hardtail, wich range from $500 to $1100, after that you upgrade parts as you go.

    As it is, my oldest son breaks something new every month on his 3 year old mongoose, and ends up riding the 6 year old frankenbike half the time until i can fix the mongoose...

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    19
    Is it the frame that's bad on department store bike or just the parts put on the bike it's self. I read that the hydro-form frame is supposed to be pretty strong that's why I'm asking. The parts seem to be brand name bottem of the line.

  19. #19
    not really an mtbr member
    Reputation: theextremist04's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    596
    On department store bikes, they're both bad. The components are pretty awful and the suspension design is very, very inefficient.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •