1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Best way to move pedals more on the side?

    New bike I'm looking to buy has Trutativ Stylo crankset which has pretty much straight crank arm and the pedals were too close to the bike frame for my taste. It felt like the round bone (don't know the real name) in my right ankle would be very close to hitting the largest chainring so I had to move my heel on the side when spinning the crank from 12 to 6 to make sure the bone wouldn't hit the chainring. On my old bike the crank arm has better shape and it goes about 15mm more to the side/outwards than Stylo. Can I update the crankarms or what should I do?

  2. #2
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    How much have you rode the bike? You might be worried for no reason. You could ask the dealer to swap out the cranks . There is a measurement that is used called the Q factor ,its the distance between pedals and bottom bracket some people use pedals with longer or shorter axles to get their feet closer or farther away.

  3. #3
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    Hmm, lower Q factor is usually better/more comfy/more desired. Maybe some longer pedals?
    Once you start changing cranks and bb you can run into chain line and front derailuer reach issues. It's best to do some research or know the outcome of the frame/crankset/bb length, and in your case q factor combo.
    Round and round we go

  4. #4
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    Best way to move pedals more on the side?

    Quote Originally Posted by empre View Post
    New bike I'm looking to buy has Trutativ Stylo crankset which has pretty much straight crank arm and the pedals were too close to the bike frame for my taste. It felt like the round bone (don't know the real name) in my right ankle would be very close to hitting the largest chainring so I had to move my heel on the side when spinning the crank from 12 to 6 to make sure the bone wouldn't hit the chainring. On my old bike the crank arm has better shape and it goes about 15mm more to the side/outwards than Stylo. Can I update the crankarms or what should I do?
    If your ankle does not hit the crankarm as you pedal, it will not hit the chainring.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    If your ankle does not hit the crankarm as you pedal, it will not hit the chainring.
    You say this as if it were an ancient Chinese proverb
    Round and round we go

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by rangeriderdave View Post
    How much have you rode the bike? You might be worried for no reason. You could ask the dealer to swap out the cranks . There is a measurement that is used called the Q factor ,its the distance between pedals and bottom bracket some people use pedals with longer or shorter axles to get their feet closer or farther away.
    I've only test driven the bike once. The Q factor of my old bike is 180mm and pedal is 100mm wide. Don't know the measurements of the new bike... have to call the shop and ask.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiggy View Post
    If your ankle does not hit the crankarm as you pedal, it will not hit the chainring.
    It might have been that the ankle was close to hit the crankarm where it connets to the BB. It has been few weeks since I took the test ride so don't remember exactly.

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