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  1. #1
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    beginner xc ok???

    question
    would an entry level XC HT work good with more aggressive riding ie. jumps, downhill as well as xc. i am probably describing an AM bike, but they can be pricy . what can i get away with. PLEASE any suggestions???

  2. #2
    not really an mtbr member
    Reputation: theextremist04's Avatar
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    no. you'll break parts at the worst time possible- your hospital bills will be more than what you saved on the bike.

  3. #3
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    What Would Any One Recommend?

  4. #4
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    XC bikes go down hills just fine.

    If youre looking at entry level bikes youre probably an entry level rider... the bike will hold up pretty well until you get comfortable enough on the bike that you would really appreciate the benefits of a nicer bike.

  5. #5
    Harshing my mellow, man..
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    What is "pricy" for you? What about the Haro Shift R1? That would be good to handle both, maybe a little heavy on the xc side. You need to decide which way you want to go with it, XC or AM/FR, then go from there.

  6. #6
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    Reputation: eatdrinkride's Avatar
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    Entry level HT bikes are fine to learn on and have a blast. If you continue to ride and progress to technical trails with ledge drops and steep roll-offs that's when the bike will become a problem b/c the geometry is too steep (too far over the bars). You won't even know it's a problem until you go over the bars on every other ride. That's when you'll try someones much more expensive bike with slacker geometry and superior suspension and say to yourself, "Wow, that bike is awesome."

    Then it's time to upgrade.

    Ride, learn, have fun. We all went through the same thing.

  7. #7
    occupation : Foole
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    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride
    Entry level HT bikes are fine to learn on and have a blast. If you continue to ride and progress to technical trails with ledge drops and steep roll-offs that's when the bike will become a problem b/c the geometry is too steep (too far over the bars). You won't even know it's a problem until you go over the bars on every other ride. That's when you'll try someones much more expensive bike with slacker geometry and superior suspension and say to yourself, "Wow, that bike is awesome."

    Then it's time to upgrade.

    Ride, learn, have fun. We all went through the same thing.
    ^^^^^ Ditto that ^^^^^

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride
    Entry level HT bikes are fine to learn on and have a blast. If you continue to ride and progress to technical trails with ledge drops and steep roll-offs that's when the bike will become a problem b/c the geometry is too steep (too far over the bars). You won't even know it's a problem until you go over the bars on every other ride. That's when you'll try someones much more expensive bike with slacker geometry and superior suspension and say to yourself, "Wow, that bike is awesome."

    Then it's time to upgrade.

    Ride, learn, have fun. We all went through the same thing.
    Yes!!!

    Working on skills is important. But being so frustrated that you don't want to ride anymore is no good.

    Gotta find that balance. And only can find it just getting out on the trail with whatever you have. Buy the best bike your budget allows. Then spend time on the trail.

  9. #9
    I like bacon... (clyde)
    Reputation: SpyderPride's Avatar
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    Limit your jumps/drops to 2-3 feet (depending on your weight) and don't feed the bike a steady diet of them and it will be fine.
    Bike: '08 Trek 6500
    Color: Oreo
    Delicious...

  10. #10
    The Martian
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halfey
    question
    would an entry level XC HT work good with more aggressive riding ie. jumps, downhill as well as xc. i am probably describing an AM bike, but they can be pricy . what can i get away with. PLEASE any suggestions???
    Most entry level hardtails aren't XC in the weight weenie, never leave the ground way some of the really high end XC bikes are. The frames are plenty burly for the average beginner testing some smallish drops and trying to figure out just where their riding style fits.

    I wouldn't do a lift assisted downhill on one and I wouldn't jump one off a 7ft drop, but you can certainly ride smallish drops and down hills

    Recommendations are best based off your build, budget, and intended primary use. For now my best recommendation is to go to every LBS around you, be honest about your intended use and your budget, then ride everything they have that you can afford. At the end you will have eliminated a few bikes and have a few left to pick from. At that point you can narrow it down based on shop, even color, or come back here for more opinions.

  11. #11
    ^ That's what I do
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    I'm sorry if this is hijacking the thread but, I have a question that is related to what the OP is asking. I just bought my first real quality mountain bike 4 months ago. It's a Rockhopper 29er (see my signature). It came with the 80mm Rockshox Dart 3 fork. What is a maximum jump/drop height that it could do without me having to worry about breaking something? Thanks
    '08 Specialized Rockhopper 29er (modified)

  12. #12
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    thanks for the input guys and gals....as you could probably tell im not planning on getting any big air but i guess i get caught up in the terminology (xc...never leve the ground ) so i dont want to hit a little table top[ once and a while and destroy my bike....thank you all and see you on the trail

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hopping_Rocks
    I'm sorry if this is hijacking the thread but, I have a question that is related to what the OP is asking. I just bought my first real quality mountain bike 4 months ago. It's a Rockhopper 29er (see my signature). It came with the 80mm Rockshox Dart 3 fork. What is a maximum jump/drop height that it could do without me having to worry about breaking something? Thanks
    Probably depends on your weight and how good are YOU at absorbing the landings. I come off of 2' drops without a second thought and can do that all day. I'm 170#s and used to riding a hardtail.

  14. #14
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    Back in the day full rigid XC style bikes were all there was. People did plenty of drops and downhill on them. The most extreme stuff that you see today wasn't possible, but almost anything you are likely to hit on an XC trail is possible hardtail or even rigid.

    Don't believe the hype.

  15. #15
    ^ That's what I do
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    Quote Originally Posted by traffic002
    Probably depends on your weight and how good are YOU at absorbing the landings. I come off of 2' drops without a second thought and can do that all day. I'm 170#s and used to riding a hardtail.
    Alright that's about the same weight I am. Thanks
    '08 Specialized Rockhopper 29er (modified)

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