1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
    SSolo
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    Which bashguard?

    Which bashguard (bash guard)?

    2008 Specialized Rockhopper Disc, mostly stock looking for a good bashguard to replace my front big ring. Current middle ring is 32t.

    These are the bash guards that look good:

    E-thirteen Charger Bash Guard - Clear
    * Clear, 13mm-thick Makrolon thermoplastic bashguard
    * Material/Design offers indestructable, no-snag usage
    * 44-tooth (max) for Big/Triple-ring protection
    * Clears all standard & elevated chainstays
    * Comes with mounting hardware
    * Made by Evil Bikes with e.thirteen logo
    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...37&category=58

    Race Face Bash Guard- 104mm
    * Machined from 1/4"-thick 6061 aluminum
    * Install in place of outer chainring
    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...17&category=58

    Truvativ DH Guard Polycarbonate Bash Guard
    * 10mm Polycarbonate
    * Protects outer ring
    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...42&category=58

    Truvativ RockGuard Polycarbon Bash Guard
    * Protects middle ring replaces outer ring
    * 10mm thick injection molded high impact polycarbonate
    * 32 and 36 tooth maximum available
    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...97&category=58

    I'm leaning towards the plastic guard for looks, no sharp edges even after grinding, no bending. The aluminum seems like it might be stronger and I've heard that you have to be real careful with the plastic ones not to over tighten the mounting bolts to keep from cracking it.

    Some of the plastic ones look to have a lot more material around the mounting holes which is good for strength but may require longer mounting bolts?

    Also going for the 36t size in case I ever want to jump up my front sprocket size and not need to buy a new guard.

    What do you think?
    Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life son...

  2. #2
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    I've a Race Face on three of my bikes, and this weekend I'm installing an e.Thirteen guard on a fourth. (I've got the red color, fwiw).

    The Race Face aluminum guards look great, and I have no complaints at all. I bought the e.Thirteen this time around for a change-of-pace, and for the color red .

    The e.Thirteen does indeed need longer bolts. Those longer bolts come with the guard. You are also supposed to use a torque wrench so as not to overtighten those bolts (44 ft/lbs of torque is the spec).

  3. #3
    SSolo
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    Thanks for the input Jonathan,

    Yeah the Race Face looks really beefy, seen a few online brands that are pretty thin and not very high grade aluminum.

    With the plastic ones, I don't like the need to use longer bolts (more weight) and need to very carefully torque the bolts to not crack it.
    Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life son...

  4. #4
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    Check out the BBG Bashguards. $14 including shipping and comes in a 36t size. They are thinner than the ones you listed, but should still be durable enough unless you are used to climbing logs with your chainring.

    I can personally vouch for the guy and the product as I have bought three so far (for different bikes, not because I broke them)

  5. #5
    Hazzah!
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    The E13 guards look great but you can't use any type of solvent based chain lube (prolink, etc...) and despite what you hear they are not indestructible (I broke two, and no I didn't over torque the bolts!)....that being said I've been using Raceface guards now with zero issues.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by kattywhumpus
    The E13 guards look great but you can't use any type of solvent based chain lube (prolink, etc...)
    That part worries me, actually, because I use Finish Line Dry Lube, and I'm thinking it must be solvent-based as it goes on wet and then dries out. I would not have bought the e.13 guard had I known ahead of time about their restriction on lubes, because I'm not going to change my lube just to suit my bashguard. That's putting the cart before the horse, for sure.

    I'm just going to run the same lube I've been running. If the e.13 guard survives, then great. If it melts away in the face of my lube, then I'll trash the guard and buy something else. I do like the e.13. I just am not too happy with having to worry about lubes.

    My next guard will probably one of these, from Purely Custom:

    http://www.purelycustom.com/c-52-bash-guards.aspx

    I've decided the color, but I'm still mulling over what to have engraved.

    It's worth pointing out that the Purely Custom guards come in models (the 3x1 Armour models) designed to mount outside your large ring. So you have the option of keeping your large ring if you want to do so.

    Oh, one random factoid that might prove helpful: My e.13 guard is obviously heavier than my Raceface guard. Both are 32-tooth guards. I don't care so much about the weight, but some might.

  7. #7
    sru
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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    Check out the BBG Bashguards. $14 including shipping and comes in a 36t size. They are thinner than the ones you listed, but should still be durable enough unless you are used to climbing logs with your chainring.

    I can personally vouch for the guy and the product as I have bought three so far (for different bikes, not because I broke them)

    +2 for the BBG

  8. #8
    Ride the dream
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanGennick
    That part worries me, actually, because I use Finish Line Dry Lube, and I'm thinking it must be solvent-based as it goes on wet and then dries out. I would not have bought the e.13 guard had I known ahead of time about their restriction on lubes, because I'm not going to change my lube just to suit my bashguard. That's putting the cart before the horse, for sure.
    Would be curious to know how that turns out - thinking about getting an E13 guard myself, and using said lube, i was wondering the same thing.

    Would be nice to know what happens with that combination...


    If anyone has a broken E13 bash and some finishline lube lying around, can you test it and let us know?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by EnglishT
    If anyone has a broken E13 bash and some finishline lube lying around, can you test it and let us know?
    Actually, that's a good idea. I'll smear some Finish Line lube on the back side of my good bashguard. I'll have to wait until after work though. I'll post back on what happens.

    I actually lubed the chain on Sunday, shortly after putting the guard on. I wasn't paying attention to the bashguard though. I'll check after work today for any signs of damage.

  10. #10
    local trails rider
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    I suppose my e.13 bashguard must be a total wreck by now: I've been using this: http://www.weldtite.co.uk/detail.asp?ProductID=88 on the chain for a couple of years now. Not sprayed directly on the bash, though....

  11. #11
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    i've got the bbg on my 07 RH.....

  12. #12
    beautiful noise...
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    Quote Originally Posted by sru
    +2 for the BBG
    +3

    I've been pounding the sh*t out of mine for over three years without one single issue. I have a number of other friends using them too. I've even bought a bunch as gifts for buddies and I've never seen one fail in any way. I ride a lot in the Pacific NW and I don't often shy away from the rough stuff. I'm 190lbs w/o gear on a 5"x5" trail bike that's built to be abused. Let's be realistic here Nate, you're riding a mid-level XC hardtail and the only thing you stand to gain from using any of the guards you've listed is a little "bling factor". If you want something functional, strong, light, and inexpensive then I would highly recommend the BBG. They come in different colors and if you contact Erin he might even be willing to do some custom etching (for a fee).
    [SIZE="4"]out- guy[/SIZE]

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  13. #13
    EDR
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    +5 for BBG from ebay.

    lightweight compared to E13. Very durable, I've been bashing mine on a 6'' bike for a year now. Cheap. Understated, which I like. I'm not one to buy into any bling stuff.

    This is enough bashring for your use no doubt, but you are free to spend much more on whatever floats your boat.

  14. #14
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    don't waste your time with ebay............... www.bbgbashguard.com

  15. #15
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    the e thirteens are the way to go
    Keep on Ridin

  16. #16
    SSolo
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    Check out the BBG Bashguards. $14 including shipping and comes in a 36t size. They are thinner than the ones you listed, but should still be durable enough unless you are used to climbing logs with your chainring.

    I can personally vouch for the guy and the product as I have bought three so far (for different bikes, not because I broke them)
    Those are the ones that are really thin (only 0.125" thick) and 5000 series aluminum.

    http://www.secowarwick.com/pressrel/...metallurgy.htm

    5000 Series- Magnesium is one of the most effective and widely used alloying elements for aluminum. When it is used as the major alloying element or with manganese, the result is a moderate to high strength non-heat-treatable alloy. Magnesium is considerably more effective than manganese as a hardener, about 0.8% magnesium being equal to 1.25% manganese, and it can be added in considerably higher quantities. Alloys in this series posses good welding characteristics and good resistance to corrosion in marine atmosphere. However, certain limitations should be placed on the amount of cold work and the safe operating temperatures permissible for the higher magnesium content alloys (over about 3 �% for operating temperatures above about 150F (66C) to avoid susceptibility to stress corrosion.

    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanGennick
    ...My next guard will probably one of these, from Purely Custom:

    http://www.purelycustom.com/c-52-bash-guards.aspx ...
    THose look nice but it doesn't say what alloy and how thick they are.

    Quote Originally Posted by guyplaysbass
    ... If you want something functional, strong, light, and inexpensive then I would highly recommend the BBG. ...
    Function over form is what I usually go with, not looking for bling.
    Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life son...

  17. #17
    beautiful noise...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Natedogz
    Those are the ones that are really thin (only 0.125" thick) and 5000 series aluminum.

    http://www.secowarwick.com/pressrel/...metallurgy.htm

    5000 Series- Magnesium is one of the most effective and widely used alloying elements for aluminum. When it is used as the major alloying element or with manganese, the result is a moderate to high strength non-heat-treatable alloy. Magnesium is considerably more effective than manganese as a hardener, about 0.8% magnesium being equal to 1.25% manganese, and it can be added in considerably higher quantities. Alloys in this series posses good welding characteristics and good resistance to corrosion in marine atmosphere. However, certain limitations should be placed on the amount of cold work and the safe operating temperatures permissible for the higher magnesium content alloys (over about 3 �% for operating temperatures above about 150F (66C) to avoid susceptibility to stress corrosion.



    THose look nice but it doesn't say what alloy and how thick they are.



    Function over form is what I usually go with, not looking for bling.
    If your bash guard reaches 150 degrees I think your bike would be too hot to ride. The original prototypes were made from old street signs. Erin still has one on his bike. Like myself and many others have already stated, the BBG bash guard works great and is cheap. To give you an idea my BBG has been on two frames and I've toasted two BBs on my current frame and yet... the BBG is absolutely fine. Rocks, logs, water, snow, mud, etc... will not hurt it. The gauge and series of aluminum (5000) is the same as what the DOT uses for highway/street signs and can stand up to just about anything but large caliber hunting rounds. So, if you shoot it with a very large gun it just might fail.
    [SIZE="4"]out- guy[/SIZE]

    [SIZE="4"]what I do when I'm not riding...[/SIZE]

  18. #18
    EDR
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    Quote Originally Posted by Natedogz
    Those are the ones that are really thin (only 0.125" thick) and 5000 series aluminum.

    http://www.secowarwick.com/pressrel/...metallurgy.htm

    5000 Series- Magnesium is one of the most effective and widely used alloying elements for aluminum. When it is used as the major alloying element or with manganese, the result is a moderate to high strength non-heat-treatable alloy. Magnesium is considerably more effective than manganese as a hardener, about 0.8% magnesium being equal to 1.25% manganese, and it can be added in considerably higher quantities. Alloys in this series posses good welding characteristics and good resistance to corrosion in marine atmosphere. However, certain limitations should be placed on the amount of cold work and the safe operating temperatures permissible for the higher magnesium content alloys (over about 3 �% for operating temperatures above about 150F (66C) to avoid susceptibility to stress corrosion.



    THose look nice but it doesn't say what alloy and how thick they are.



    Function over form is what I usually go with, not looking for bling.
    I don't know what to make of that...Dude! It's not a space-shuttle. Maybe I read this wrong but if you are dissing the BBG then you are over-reaching with specs, to say the least. Take it from people who actually use them. They are cheap, light and strong. Maybe the only MTB part in the world that I would comfortably attribute all three qualities to

  19. #19
    SSolo
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    Aight, well guess I'll give the BBG a try, coming from the world of rock crawling I'm used to needing overkill built stuff.
    Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life son...

  20. #20
    EDR
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    Quote Originally Posted by Natedogz
    Aight, well guess I'll give the BBG a try, coming from the world of rock crawling I'm used to needing overkill built stuff.
    We ( I ) am not trying to steer you from an E13 or Raceface or anything else. Those are used by many. It's just that for your described application those relatively expensive models will serve you no better than a BBG. In the end you should purchase whatever floats your boat. I mean a BBG is 10 bucks and a RF is maybe 30 bucks, E13's are much more I believe. The BBG is not flashy unless you order a personally laser scribed design, even then most will never notice. Many of us like the understated design that functions as well as one could wish for.

    Function over form in this case

  21. #21
    SSolo
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    I appreciate the input.
    Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life son...

  22. #22
    local trails rider
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    It does not have to be a Blackspire or e.13 to work well...

    I have the e.13 because I have their chain guide on the FS bike. My SS HT has just "a guard" the LBS happened to have left over from somebody's build. They often have such odds and ends around, when people don't want a "standard solution".

  23. #23
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    BBG's are great, fast shipping great response time from Erin, tough as hell and cheap. Cant go wrong!

  24. #24
    Former Ninja
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    Hey guys, just thought I'd chime in...

    Anything mineral spirit based will cause the plastics in our bashguards to become brittle. Otherwise, our Superchargers can be put in a vise and bent in half without breaking. As for some common lubes that aren't good...Pro-Link, WD40, and Boeshield T9...

    However, we do recommend using Tri-Flow, Finish Line, White Lightning or Motorex.

    Just stay away from those mineral based ones

  25. #25
    Hazzah!
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    Quote Originally Posted by philw86
    ....Otherwise, our Superchargers can be put in a vise and bent in half without breaking......
    and this proves what?.....I don't often encounter a vise on the trail. I would be much happier if they would survive a shape impact from a rock....mine exploded in three separate pieces after a vicious impact with a squared edge boulder resulting in an equally vicious high speed endo....

    nothing is indestructible.



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