1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    anyone use this rigid fork?

    Ive been looking for a cheap rigid fork for my hardrock and ran across this

    On-One CroMo 26er MTB Fork

    right length and good price except it doesnt look like they have one for vbrakes in stock. I really like the look of it. Is this the only place to get this fork from and has anyone used it before? I cant seem to find to much info on it

    I know ebay has alum forks that look like this but ive read bad things bout alum forks on here. Carbon is outta the question as i weigh 240lbs. Can anyone point me in the direction to something similar that wont break the bank. thanks

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by jhmeathead View Post
    Carbon is outta the question as i weigh 240lbs.
    I can't see the logic of that statement, it's the integrity of the design and construction rather than the material that's important. Carbon is the strongest material you can make a fork out of and there's nothing wrong with Ali either, the bad things you've heard should only put you off that particular fork, not the material used.

    I used to weigh 220+lbs and I rode (and abused) a very light carbon fork for 15 years without a problem.

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hogdog View Post
    I can't see the logic of that statement, it's the integrity of the design and construction rather than the material that's important. Carbon is the strongest material you can make a fork out of and there's nothing wrong with Ali either, the bad things you've heard should only put you off that particular fork, not the material used.

    I used to weigh 220+lbs and I rode (and abused) a very light carbon fork for 15 years without a problem.
    Only because this is a Beginners forum, i want to point out that this is not great advice. Yes, when carbon is built to handle extreme abuse, it can be incredibly strong. Fact is, the majority of carbon forks have weight limits. There is a reason for this. It is possible that a 280lb rider could ride one for the next 10yrs and not have an issue. But, i wouldn't trust it. The front end is the last place i want a failure.

    That said, a Ti and aluminum fork could also fail. Although, they are generally built with a higher durability range. Carbon is usually designed with lightweight in mind. Not burly strength.

  5. #5
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    I thought carbon forks had weight limits plus the price isnt something i see dropping on a bike only worth a couple hundred.

    Are aluminum forks really that much worse than steel? I ride mostly roads, bike trails, gravel single tracks

  6. #6
    Just Ride
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    Niner carbon fork has no weight limit.
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  7. #7
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    I've been thinking hard about switching my SS to a rigid fork since I ride with my suspension fork locked out 99% of the time anyways.

  8. #8
    local trails rider
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    To the original question...
    As far as I know, there is nothing particularly wrong with the On-One steel fork - as long as it is a good length for your bike. Depending on where you are located, shipping and Customs might affect the cost.

    Also take a look at Surly and Salsa steel forks. They don't exactly cost a fortune and lots of people use them too without issues.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  9. #9
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    If cost is the main issue then yeah, carbon is probably out of the question but don't be put off for any other reason, a good fork is a good fork regardless of material. Just looking at their website and none of On-One's carbon forks appear to have a weight limit but this is getting sidetracked...Apologies.

  10. #10
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    if you need a rigid fork for v-brakes, you can't go wrong with Surly. what is the length of the current fork, or what length fork was your frame designed for?

    instigator fork, 100mm

    1x1 fork- 80mm

  11. #11
    B-J
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    Aluminum forks could seem a bit harsh on the front. If you're on a tight budget get down to your local bike stores and see what they've got in their spares bin - bikes come in to get full suss forks fitted and the old forks get left in the shop. You'd be surprised what you can get for $20

  12. #12
    wyrd bi ful rd
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    Was using this On One steel rigid fork on singletracks for sometime. It is a lot of fun but it gives you a real work-out.

    anyone use this rigid fork?-20070901-yeti-arc-69er-htr-02-800-538-mtbr-forum.jpg

  13. #13
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    my axle to crown measurement is close to 457mm. do you take 10% off that for sag?

  14. #14
    local trails rider
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    You take off whatever your real sag is, just sitting on the bike.
    Tie a rubber band, or something, around fork stanchion, touching the lowers. Get on the bike in riding position, maybe ride a little on a smooth surface. See how much the rubber band moved. That is your sag.

    A few mm here or there is nothing to worry about in A to C. An inch can be pretty noticeable.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

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