1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
    WML
    WML is offline
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    Anybody replaced/upgraded Hardrock's forks ??

    Wondering if anyone has upgraded there forks on there Specialized Hardrocks ? wondering what forks you went with, and how they work out for you ?

  2. #2
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    I got my wife an older hardrock that came with RS Dart 3 forks, she is pretty light and it was not possible to adjust the rebound so I got her a set of Recon Silver - they work well

  3. #3
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    I have been considering a lock out style fork for my hardrock. A set that doesnt break the bank anyways.

  4. #4
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    Just beware of one thing with forks: under about $200, you aren't going to be really upgrading the feel of the fork, just switching brands. A Recon Silver would not perform poorly if you were looking to upgrade and had a budget to match. While the Solo Air model ($300) would give you the most bang for your buck in terms of performance, the coil version at around $200 would not be a bad fork, just springy. You can adjust the rebound, but it does not change the overall feel of the fork; to understand this, it may be helpful to kick the tires at a LBS, so to speak. Find a couple of bikes, preferably with the same fork, just in air and coil types. Give them a few pumps, and the difference should be pretty obvious.

  5. #5
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I have an '07 Hardrock.

    For a while, I had an '06 Manitou R7 Platinum. Killed it. I liked it fairly well while it was working. It was stiffer than the POS RST that the bike shipped with, and shortening the travel made the bike a bit more nimble, which was cool. It had a platform damper that was a little finicky to dial in, but I loved the way it worked once I got it working well for me. As the fork aged, it got a bit harsher. Finally, it wore out.

    Now I have a '01 Marzocchi Bomber Z2 Atom Sport. It's stiffer than the R7 was, which is pretty cool - the bike tracks a bit better. I find I don't miss the platform damper as much as I thought I would, but it does move around more than I'd like when I climb out of the saddle. Oh well.

    You need to match steer tube size, wheel size, brake type, front hub type, and be at least close with amount of travel. I wouldn't put a 100mm fork on a current-model Hardrock unless I could back it down to 80 if it messed up the handling. Something really old-school would be more trouble than it would be worth.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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