1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
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  1. #1
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    Anti-Seize or All-Purpose Assembly Grease?

    I'm trying to determine whether I should get Park's anti-seize compound or Pedro's Velo all-purpose assembly grease.

    The Pedro's stuff is much cheaper per volume than the Park Tool compound.

    My frame is aluminum and for the forseeable future, I only plan on using the grease for the seat post, fasteners and pedals.

    Should I get the anti-seize compound, the general purpose assembly grease, or both?

    All-purpose
    Anti-seize

  2. #2
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    I'm not a huge fan of the multi-purpose stuff, but it'll take care of all your needs, in a pinch.

    The Anti Sieze I use (Permatex, in small tubes from the auto parts store) contains small particles which will grind away at any bearing, bushing or pivot. I'd be hesitant to put that sutff even in a seat tube, but it's great for bottom brackets, bolts, pedal threads and spokes.

    I like a heavy white lithium grease for static stuff, such as seat posts. All purpose grease it too runny for my liking for those applications.

    The all purpose stuff is ok for wheel bearings, but there are better waterproof wheel bearing greases.

    For suspension pivot bearings and headsets, I recently began using Rock & Roll Super Web, a grease specific to uses in low-rotational bearing applications.
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  3. #3
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    I'm picking up synthetic grease for bearings and cables and whatnot, but yea, I'm looking for how to grease up the bb in the future as well.

    Hmm, maybe I should hit up the auto supply store.

  4. #4
    pronounced may-duh
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    Anti-seize is not grease. Anti-seize should be on fasteners. Basically anything with threads. You can get a jar at auto zone for cheap. One jar will last a lifetime.

    Grease is for bearings and seat posts. Any waterproof grease will do. I have been using Phil wood lately but I also like the heavy white lithium from finish line and the funky smelling synthetic stuff like Pedro's.

  5. #5
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    Get both and some thread lock

    I use locite 690 works with grease etc so you don't have to total clean everything.

  6. #6
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    The Park Tool anti-seize compound description:

    Ideal for bottom bracket and pedal threads, pressed headset cups, seat posts, quill stems, etc
    I get it now! It only now hit me that they're probably talking about the steapost locking mechanism. I have a quick release so I completely forgot to consider that. Or maybe they are talking about the seatpost shaft itself. *shrug*

    Everything's starting to make sense now. Anti-seize for threaded fasteners, assembly grease for seat posts etc. I'll just order both.

    So the anti-seize compound would also be good on something like the crankarm fastener since they have to be torqued pretty tight?

    What do you guys recommend using on pedals? (Thank you)

  7. #7
    pronounced may-duh
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    No I think they meant the part of the seat post that contacts the frame.

    When metal contacts metal it can corrode and bond to together making it hard or impossible to take apart later. Anti-seize keeps things from getting stuck together. So use it anywhere metal contacts metal But not areas that require lubrication to move. Like bearings. For bearings you use grease to reduce friction and on a bike you use waterproof grease to withstand the elements. Lastly your chain gets oil as a lubricant cause grease would be to thick and sticky.

    I would recommend anti-seize for the pedal threads and waterproof grease for the pedal bearings. Does that clear it up?

    But don't get the park anti-seize get the cheaper stuff from auto zone.

  8. #8
    pronounced may-duh
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    Thread lock is also used some times on bolts that may wiggle free from vibration. Works good on brake bolts.

  9. #9
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    Well I've already have Pedro's synthetic grease for bearings and such.

    I think I'll go with both anti-seize and Pedro's general purpose assembly grease. I'm still having a tough time distinguishing the applications where they don't overlap. All purpose grease for seat posts and other metal-metal areas, and anti-seize for threaded fasteners and high torque contacts such as pedal threads.

    Eh, it'll be easier for me to just order both than to go to Autozone (which I need to do anyways today) and try to pick amongst the variety there.

    Your comments have helped me figure out this greasy confusion.

    Edit: I do see some blue thread lock on some deraileur screws but not on the fasteners that hold the v-brakes to the frame.

  10. #10
    pronounced may-duh
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sir Stuey
    Well I've already have Pedro's synthetic grease for bearings and such.good that will work fine

    I think I'll go with both anti-seize and Pedro's general purpose assembly grease. I'm still having a tough time distinguishing the applications where they don't overlap. All purpose grease for seat posts and other metal-metal areas, and anti-seize for threaded fasteners and high torque contacts such as pedal threads.you can use grease or anti-sieze any any of these aplications. You could use the pedros grease that you already have. Grease is a good substitute for anti-sieze.

    Eh, it'll be easier for me to just order both than to go to Autozone (which I need to do anyways today) and try to pick amongst the variety there.

    Your comments have helped me figure out this greasy confusion.

    Edit: I do see some blue thread lock on some deraileur screws but not on the fasteners that hold the v-brakes to the frame.some times it's not needed if you have problems with them coming loose than you can use the thread lock. if not just use grease or anti-sieze to make sure they don't become bonded to the frame.

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  11. #11
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    Ah, ok.

    I'm still a little confused but it's getting better.

    For some reason, I can't wrap my mind around what Pedro's Velo grease is for. I read the description of the synthetic grease and your last post, and I now see that I can use that for any and all of my greasing needs and not just for bearings and the like.

    Is there a huge difference between the synthetic grease and the "Velo" grease that justifies the price difference? The synthetic grease is $5 for 3 oz @ Jenson and the Velo grease is $6 for 16 oz.

    Is the Velo grease mostly for general purpose use to make assembly go smoother and the synthetic grease a higher quality for long-term maintenance?

    Edit: I just realized that "Velo" just means "bike". But that doesn't clear up anything else.

  12. #12
    pronounced may-duh
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    The velo is the cheap run of the mill grease and the synthetic is the high end bike snob grease. They both get used the same way.

    Just like you have regular motor oil and the expensive synthetic motor oil.

    Either way your bike will be fine and doubt you could tell the difference between the two. Maybe the synthetic lasts longer but I'm not fully convinced.

  13. #13
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    Ah, ok. Thanks for the clarrification!

  14. #14
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    Anti-seize is to form a barrier between two dissimilar metals, so the parts don't galvanically weld themselves together.
    All's well that ends.

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