1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Another new MTB'er thread

    For the past few months I'd been thinking of getting a bike to ride around for cardio purposes. I've been bored with the usual treadmill or stairstepper routine, and wanted to get outside, and not too big on jogging. In speaking with my brother about it the other day, he mentioned it would be a good idea, and he went out and bought a bike. He got a Mongoose Blackcomb for a really good price. In the researching I've done on bikes recently, I intially was going to go with just a comfort or road bike to hit the streets with. I then started talking with someone in a local Trek store that mentioned some trails around the area that are good for MTB's. I did a little research, and looked at nearly every bike shop in town, including pawn shops to see what was out there. I found this site to be a pretty valuable resource, between posts, and the reviews section. As opposed to my initial thoughts of running to Walmart and picking up the cheapest bike they had, I purchased a Giant Rincon. I actually was wheeling the Giant Boulder SE to the counter, and passed this bike, and liked it much better. It was also selling for cheaper than the Boulder was also since it was an older model. Feels like a really nice bike, and I look forward to enjoying my time outside with it this year.

    Also, wanted to thank the folks on the board for the informative posts out there that really help when decision making is tough.

  2. #2
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    Welcome to the forums

    Sounds like you found yourself a bargain Nice entry level bike, and certainly an upgrade over the Boulder. Let us know how you like it.

    Bob
    'If Wal-Mart sold parachutes, who would jump?' Frank Havnoonian (quoting his father) Drexel Hill Cyclery

  3. #3
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    8spd vs 9spd

    I am in the process of stripping out and refitting my rig. it is an 04 hardrock comp. It came as an 8speed and as I am looking to upgrade I need some advice. There are not alot of parts options out there as far as shifters and deralures( spelling). I have bought a 2007 xt 761 front and an 07 xt 761 rear deralure. I am throwing on an LX crank but i am torn as to whether or not I should keep it 8 speed or go for the nine speed. I have heard nine speed casets lack staying power and as I ride 10-20 miles of trail and single track three days a week, durability is soemthing important to me. The best shifter deal for the 8speed i could find was a shimano aliveo dual shifter break set up. What should I do.
    Thanks,
    Your friendly newb
    "The greatest oak was once a little nut that held it's ground"
    FDR

  4. #4
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    Good choice, keep the board updated on how it rides!

  5. #5
    ...the wave won't brek
    Reputation: anthrax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moroskim
    I am in the process of stripping out and refitting my rig. it is an 04 hardrock comp. It came as an 8speed and as I am looking to upgrade I need some advice. There are not alot of parts options out there as far as shifters and deralures( spelling). I have bought a 2007 xt 761 front and an 07 xt 761 rear deralure. I am throwing on an LX crank but i am torn as to whether or not I should keep it 8 speed or go for the nine speed. I have heard nine speed casets lack staying power and as I ride 10-20 miles of trail and single track three days a week, durability is soemthing important to me. The best shifter deal for the 8speed i could find was a shimano aliveo dual shifter break set up. What should I do.
    Thanks,
    Your friendly newb

    You should start this in a new thread instead of hijacking this one...

    But to answer your question deffinatly go 9 speed unless you can find some 8 speed XT shifters. Putting the Alivio parts with the XT parts is like taking a '70 Dodge Challenger and putting a 4 cylinder engine in it...
    2008 Santa Cruz Superlight SPX-XC Kit

    2003 Specialized Rockhopper FSR-XC Comp

    2006 Specialized Allez Sport Double

  6. #6
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    Well, took it out around the block really quick last night, which is the first ride other than around the store really quick yesterday. It's probably been about 10 to 12 years since I've even sat on a bike, I haven't had one since I was a young teen. It's going to take some getting used to, especially how light the bike is compared to others I used to ride. I learned quickly that I'm going to have to get another set of wheels/tires that are more road worthy than the knobby tires that are one there now. Is it normal to get a bit unstable at higher speeds with the MTB tires on there? The weather here looks to be giving a break tomorrow with it around 70, so that should be perfect weather to get a nice ride in.

    Also, what would be a decent wheel/tire combo for street and road riding? I'd just get tires, but I don't want to have to change them out all the time. They don't need to be great, something on the lower end would work fine for me.
    Last edited by dbakek; 04-26-2007 at 06:17 AM.

  7. #7
    ...the wave won't brek
    Reputation: anthrax's Avatar
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    Look at a low rolling resistance MTB tire and use them on the road and the trail.

    I have Kenda Karisma Lites on my MTB right now and they are an easy rolling tire that ware like iron. They have been a great tire. Three seasons of Road and Trail riding with out complaint.

    Try something like that before you go and spend the $ on new rims.

    BTW once you get the hang of it tires are easy to change (5min job)
    2008 Santa Cruz Superlight SPX-XC Kit

    2003 Specialized Rockhopper FSR-XC Comp

    2006 Specialized Allez Sport Double

  8. #8
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    Reputation: snaky69's Avatar
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    Some comfort tires on a cheap wheelset would work fine, ask your LBS about what they have in stock.

  9. #9
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    I'll check into those tires anthrax, and thanks for all of the information guys!

  10. #10
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    Actually, I got to looking at the tires online, and they appear similar to the tires that are already on the bike. I know the tires equipped are Kenda's, I'll just have to make sure what style they are when I get home.

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