• 12-28-2012
    mountainmatt
    Another n00b saddle question.
    My saddle is tilted slightly forward, meaning that the front of it slopes slightly down. Should it be completely level?
  • 12-28-2012
    sfb12
    I also have this question. Except my saddle is faced a little upward not downward.
  • 12-28-2012
    GreenCanoe
    For most people, it is more comfortable for the saddle to be level or tilted nose-up a tiny bit. Saddles are a very personal item, though. Different bone structures require a different saddle angle, width, etc. Since it is one of the three areas where your body comes in contact with the bike you (IMO) might consider throwing away everybody's opinions (ironic...) on what you should have and ride whats the most comfortable. After all, they aren't the ones who have a sore a** after a long ride. :cool: The only problem with tilting the saddle forward is you may start sliding off it. But if that isn't happening, then whatever.

    EDIT: Go to your local bike shop and see if they have test saddles too. You may not know what you are missing out on. Get fitted for a seat and see the difference.
  • 12-28-2012
    wmac
    Depends on if you like it that way or not. Some people tilit it slightly up so when they load their forks, it is level. Some point it down so it doesn't catch on their shorts.
  • 12-28-2012
    cbw
    I point my down a smidge for catch free riding
  • 12-28-2012
    Piratefly
    As mentioned, it's really what you prefer. Ride it for 30 minutes in one position. Then move it the other way and ride another 30 minutes. It might need some fine tuning but your body will tell you what's better for you.
  • 12-28-2012
    jetboy23
    What everyone said. It should be exactly where its comfortable for you to have it. Level is the start point. Get it set forward/rear for your knee about over the pedal spindle. Height for about a 15-20 degree bend at full extension. Ride it seated for 30-45 minutes and if you are putting pressure on your bits or sliding off the front/rear, then, tilt to compensate.

    Some downhillers like it nose up a bit to help getting behind and it levels out on the descent. Some XC riders like it tilted down slightly to level out on the long climbs.

    What works for you will work for you. What works for me would only be coincidence to work for you. Trial and error means more miles turning the pedals. Thats a good thing.