1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
    4od
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    All-mountain on an XC bike

    I've been building a bike and I just realized that many of the components I am using are considered to be cross-country components, and the kind of biking I do could easily be considered "all-mountain." Will I reduce the lifetime of my parts by riding them for something other then their intended purpose?

    The components in question are my fork and bar: a Fox F80 RL and an Easton Monkey Lite XC. Also, is the 2003 S-Works Enduro frame intended more for XC or AM?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    more carbon=more awesome
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    I wouldn't worry too much. The bike is at the smaller end of the trail or AM spectrum as far as travel goes, but it should be able to handle anything you care to throw at it. The only part that potentially worries me is the carbon XC handlebar. Reconstructive dentistry doesn't come cheap, so you may want to swap that one for something a bit heavier and stronger as a precaution.
    Posting on the basis that ignorance shared is ignorance doubled.

  3. #3
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    I'm pretty sure Hans Rey rode for a while with a modified F80 on his trials bike, so i wouldn't worry so much about durability as the amount of travel. But with only 3" of travel, I would ditch the carbon bars also. I would say your frame is more AM, and if possible, I think it would be worth it to sell the fork to an xc guy and get atleast a 100mm if not a 130mm fork on the front of that thing for a bit more squish. A cheap alternative would be a Rockshox Tora or most things on ebay.

  4. #4
    Ride the dream
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    Those came stock with 100mm fork I think.

    Youre gonna wany 100+ or the angles gonna be very steep.

  5. #5
    4od
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    Hmm.. I saw this thread about modifying an F80 into an F100...

    Is that a bad idea?

  6. #6
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    I have a Mongoose Canaan Team and it's also an enduro frame,I think they are made a little bit beefier than the usual XC frames are.I also have an 80mm fork and carbon bars and I would think switching to a 100mm fork would be the most important thing.

  7. #7
    4od
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    No, Enduro is the actual model name of the frame.

    I think I'll try the fork modification tomorrow.

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