1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    58 gram 29er tube!

    somehow I came across an interweb ditty re this Eclipse outfit with SUPER LIGHTWEIGHT tubes. They sure aren't cheap @ like $57 for a 1.75-2.25 29er tube, but @ 58 grams! If teamed up with a lightweight XC 550g tire, you might be onto something worth a look-see knowing a "typical" tube is 200g ish. I did a serach here and didn't find anything...I guess one major concern would be durability, but XC should be about as good an application as possible. They do advertise it as a 29er, not a 700C so it would appear Eclipse feels they have an application in mtb. Anybody got any knowledge to share?

  2. #2
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    It only make sense if you have the race weight bike and tires and you want to set a new personal or world record. I don't think racers race with the lightest tube usually they go tubeless, racers stick with mostly reliable components.

    You want a light tire? check out the 345g Maxlite 29er.

  3. #3
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    okay...but, I'd still like to know if they are worth-a-hoot to a tube dude.

  4. #4
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    I pity mountain bikers who still feel the need to use tubes, let alone expensive, fragile, weight-weenie tubes.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnlh View Post
    I pity mountain bikers who still feel the need to use tubes, let alone expensive, fragile, weight-weenie tubes.
    I'm not sure I pity them, but regardless there are still a couple out there still resisting....and yes, I am tubeless and my curious mind still wants to know.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnlh View Post
    I pity mountain bikers who still feel the need to use tubes, let alone expensive, fragile, weight-weenie tubes.
    I pity mountain bikers that dont see the need to use dropper seatposts.

    And disc brakes.

    Maybe full suspension as well.

    Alloy wheelsets.

  7. #7
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    I'm still using tubes for the time being, and if I were the sort who lit my cigars with 100 dollar bills I'd pony up for a case of them right now. $57 a pop is crazy talk for a working man though.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by 006_007 View Post
    I pity mountain bikers that dont see the need to use dropper seatposts.

    And disc brakes.

    Maybe full suspension as well.

    Alloy wheelsets.
    Fair enough, and sorry if I came across as mean. Still,there is no way that I would ever want to go back to tubes for trail riding. In over 1,000 hours of riding this year, I have only had to add air following a few of the more serious punctures. Thorns, cactus,& small debris are not an issue, neither is the occasional rim strike. Traction is excellent.

  9. #9
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    I tried lightweight tubes on my bike, the standard ones (Maxxis Freeride 26") weighed 300g and l fitted some "Superlight" which weighed 100g.

    So that was a saving of 200g at each wheel rim. I was told that it would make a "huge" difference, but l could not feel any at all.

    The main issue though, was noise levels, with the lightweight tubes the tyres were much more noisy on the road.

    If you flicked the tyre with your finger they made a ringing sound, where it was just a dull thud with the heavier tubes.

    So l put the original tubes back on the bike, and sold the lightweight ones on ebay. They went for next to nothing.

  10. #10
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    "ringing" might not be all bad...

  11. #11
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    They rang/made kind of a singing noise as l cycled along the road, off road l noticed no difference in noise levels.

    I was as surprised as anybody, in fact l refitted the original tubes for a while, then went back to the lightweight ones, just to be sure.

  12. #12
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    IMHO tubeless conversion kit for 2 wheels : $60
    Extra Sealant for refills over the next couple years : $20
    Not popping an tissue paper tube everytime something that looks sharp touches it: Priceless

    All that vs way over $60 for a pair of superlight tubes.
    Cool idea, nice to see tech that allows for such light tubes and would have a purpose since weight would be = < tubeless setup. Just think its a giant waste of funds and seriously wasted time repairing/replacing constantly on the trails. All this coming from a guy that hasnt switched to tubeless yet because simply waiting till after xmas when I order my new tires. I could spend that extra money on some new gloves or jersey or, long list of stuff $60 extra could do.
    Trek Marlin 29er

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  13. #13
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    I have to say though, l did not notice any difference from the lighter weight either.
    And 200g at the wheel rim is a fair bit.

    Maybe if l was racing, or had a lightweight bike, l would have noticed more.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by lotusdriver View Post
    I have to say though, l did not notice any difference from the lighter weight either.
    And 200g at the wheel rim is a fair bit.

    Maybe if l was racing, or had a lightweight bike, l would have noticed more.
    You probably have really strong legs then.

    I noticed a difference spinning a wheelset up that was 200g lighter. I weighed both wheelsets AFTER I rode both of them on the same bike.

    As far as tubeless VS tubes - I found virtually no difference weight wise (I now use tubes that weigh in at 120g), and after testing rolling resistance I found no difference in rolling resistance either.

    I do not live/ride in an area with cactus, thorns etc so the benefits of self sealing repairs didnt help me at all in the terrain that I ride. For me tubes are an easier way to go, with no significant downsides.

    Easy solution for the ringing your mountain bike gets when riding on the road - ride it in the mountain, and get a road bike!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by 006_007 View Post
    I noticed a difference spinning a wheelset up that was 200g lighter. I weighed both wheelsets AFTER I rode both of them on the same bike.

    As far as tubeless VS tubes - I found virtually no difference weight wise (I now use tubes that weigh in at 120g), and after testing rolling resistance I found no difference in rolling resistance either.

    I do not live/ride in an area with cactus, thorns etc so the benefits of self sealing repairs didnt help me at all in the terrain that I ride. For me tubes are an easier way to go, with no significant downsides.

    Easy solution for the ringing your mountain bike gets when riding on the road - ride it in the mountain, and get a road bike!
    I agree. It all depends on your set up and preference. I don't ride with super low psi as I like to load my tires hard in the corners and brakes, low psi would not do it for me. One of the front tire has tube in it because I forgot to redo my tubeless after a trailside fixed, I couldn't tell the difference. Is the Tubeless set up better? no doubt, but it's not the end of the world.

  16. #16
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    I pity weight weenies.

    Very few thorns where I live. Plenty of rocks that like to burp low pressure tubleless set-ups though. Ran a set for awhile, went back to tubes, since I found I was installing them trailside anyway.

    By my way of thinking, if the fix for a flat tubeless tire is to put a tube in it, I'm gonna cut out the middleman.

  17. #17
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    Hi.

    The Eclipse tubes are not fragile. I ran the 26" 2,25-2,6 tube in the front wheel on my DH bike last season. Was riding for 19 days before my first puncture on these tubes.

    If you want to spend a lot on money on solid and super lightweight tubes, go for it.

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