1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
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    2000 Trek 7000 Frame

    My first post. Anyway I have a 2000 Trek 7000 and am wondering if it will be a good platform to keep and upgrade parts little by little to some lighter/better stuff. I bought the bike new out of my price range with the idea I would have the frame a long time. At the time that step got me the "nicer", USA built, frame. I rode the bike quite a bit for the first couple of years, then less and less. I know it's crazy, but I didn't get on it once last year. So this year I'm changing all that and giving it the love it deserves. But now that I've been out riding it and reading the forums I'm thinking about putting my economic stimulus check to some good use. My question is, "Is this the frame to sink money in?" It fits great. The frame has a disc mount on the chainstay, and I think it's a Hayes? In the near future I'm thinking about replacing the fork with something stiffer and with a lock out and maybe a bit more travel. Hence my question, I don't want to drop a ton of cash on a fork if I should save up.

  2. #2
    youenjoymyself
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    (Also my first post!) I'm in the same situation you are in... i have a Trek 6500 from 2001. It has been sitting in my garage for over 3 years and I finally got back into it. I got it all tuned up, new tires, grips, etc... All that said, I am going to hold out for a new bike instead of upgrading components on an older frame.

  3. #3
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    Anyone?

  4. #4
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    Hey there...

    I have a '99 Trek 7000 which I have been riding pretty hard over the past 9 years. I have upgraded it a lot (longer travel fork, new wheelset, Magura hydraulic rim brakes, etc) and I love it. It's a solid frame, I have had no problems with it whatsoever, and with the lifetime warranty there's really not much to worry about. But it's an XC bike, so I wouldn't recommend more than a 4" travel fork (which is what I'm running) as it will throw the geometry off quite a bit. I had a lot of people tell me the Z3 LT fork I put on was too much, but I like the way it handles.. didn't take long to get used to it.

    I guess it depends on the type of riding you'll be doing. It's great for XC.. I find the short chainstays really help its climbing ability. But in my experience, as I got more into the sport I realized I would have preferred more of a trail/AM bike. The upgrades I've made tried to compensate for this and overall I'm happy with the slight 'conversion', but if I had to do it all again, I'd get something with slacker geometry and more travel; simply because that's more the style of riding I like. I have a shorter stem on the way and am anxious to see how that affects the ride...

    I'm currently thinking about plopping down some serious cash for a new full suspension rig but don't plan on selling the Trek. It's a great bike that has served me very well.

    Pics here: http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...81#post2237881

  5. #5
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    Keep in mind the cost of new components compared to the cost of a new bike. If you are planning on upgrading every component on the bike, it would probably be cheaper to buy new. If it's ridable now and the fit is good, I would just swap out that parts that need to be replaced. Those frames should be pretty solid. My old trek lasted me a long time.

    I'm also in the process of rebuilding a Trek 6500 frame into a SS. Lucky for me I have a LBS with a good supply of used and unwanted components they're selling me for cheap.

  6. #6
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    Yeah, I'm not looking to upgrade everything, just swap them out with something better when they wear out or break. I'm looking for a new shock since I rode my girlfriend's new 4500 and it has a Dart 3 which beats the hell out of my '00 Manitou SX. My question is more along the lines of is this frame worth putting better parts on.. How much different is a current 8500 frame from my older 7000 frame? When have I gone too far, and instead of spending a few extra bucks on the next part, I should pick up a cheap used part and save for a nicer bike?

  7. #7
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    It is your call in the end, but if there is nothing wrong with your older frame, and it sounds like is has been neglected (by non-use, not abuse) over the last few years it probably still has many years of useful life left.

    I personally just spent a good chunk of change over the past year or so replacing and upgrading parts on my beloved Giant that had been languishing in my basement for many years. The amount I spent on the bike would have bought me a nice brand new FS rig... but the thing is, I spread the cost over several months, and now have a kick-butt XC hardtail that I can be proud of, and would be hard pressed to find a better bike for me on the trails.

    If you're looking to replace/upgrade everything all at once, then by all means, buy a new bike, you'll be better served in the long run. But if you're looking to do it part by part, then keep the old frame, LOTS of people are riding older frames...and unless you're doing more aggressive trail riding, you'll probably die before the frame does

    Cheers,

    Tim

  8. #8
    Mountain Cyclist
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    I have a 01 6500zx (7000 and 6500 was the exact same frame) that just recently became my back up bike. It depends on what you want to do...that thing did everything XC-wise, but I don't see it as a serious race bike because of its weight/disc mount. You can easily buy an adapter for the rear that allows the newer universal mounted discs though.

    I wouldn't worry about investing in nice parts too much b/c its not necessarily money wasted. I built mine up with full XTR and when the time came I just switched everything over to my new bike, although I had to buy disc rims/brakes because I had vbrakes on it (if you're looking for rims the mavic crossrides, and many others, come in both v and disc compatible). The best thing you can do is upgrade to a better fork, and the steer tube will stay long enough to fit most bikes if you wanna put it on anything in the future.

    I say upgrade away, it really is a great frame if you're not racing it every weekend!

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