1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
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    2000-2001 Kona Cindercone restore

    Hi all,
    I am new here and I have been out of the MTB thing for a while while my tires deflated and my poor forks continued to leak. Needless to say, I am in for a major overhaul and was hoping to get some tips on where to start. I have taken everything down to the frame, except for the crank and headset.

    The bike is a hardtail with V brakes. It was always really light and i want to continue that trend.

    I am looking to purchase all XTR parts:

    rear derrailleur
    front derrailleur
    Cassette
    Hollow crank and bottom bracket
    shifters
    V brakes
    cables

    Specialty tools needed:
    Spin Doctor crank extrator kit
    Something to pound out the old Headset

    XTR was always the big kid on the block. Are any other brands better?

  2. #2
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    XTR is "ok".

  3. #3
    Former Bike Wrench
    Reputation: mtnbiker72's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chazb0
    Hi all,
    I am new here and I have been out of the MTB thing for a while while my tires deflated and my poor forks continued to leak. Needless to say, I am in for a major overhaul and was hoping to get some tips on where to start. I have taken everything down to the frame, except for the crank and headset.

    The bike is a hardtail with V brakes. It was always really light and i want to continue that trend.

    I am looking to purchase all XTR parts:

    rear derrailleur
    front derrailleur
    Cassette
    Hollow crank and bottom bracket
    shifters
    V brakes
    cables

    Specialty tools needed:
    Spin Doctor crank extrator kit
    Something to pound out the old Headset

    XTR was always the big kid on the block. Are any other brands better?
    Seems excessive for a $750 bike new...but to each their own. SRAM XX would be arguably above XTR, SRAM XO would be closer to a direct comparison.

  4. #4
    Hi.
    Reputation: jtmartino's Avatar
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    If you've been "out of the MTB thing for a while," the price of XTR may surprise you.

    I would absolutely NOT spend that kind of money building up an entry-level frame. Unless you can steal the components or you're going to buy used, expect to spend over $1,000 on parts alone.

    Now, since you said V-brakes, one might assume that you're talking about building it up with older XTR components, like M-952. In that case, you can't beat XTR. But you're still spending quite a bit of money, especially trying to find an older crankset in good shape.

    My 100% recommendation is to set a budget for yourself then go out and find a used bike on craigslist with good parts. Occasionally I've seen hardtails with XT/XTR in the $300-$400 range, which would probably be easier than sourcing your own parts.


    Oh, and you'll also need a cassette tool to remove the cassette lockring.

  5. #5
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    I own a 2008 Yamaha YZ450F and have been riding motocross for five years, so I know how expensive our sports can be.

    I have XT right now on "actually off" the bike. I never liked the way it shifted.

    I might be able to just run what I have, cleaned and lubed up.

    But I do for sure need a new shock.

  6. #6
    BMW 2002, Dodge A100, etc
    Reputation: Pimpride's Avatar
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    Get nice XTR pod shifters and maybe a XTR deraileur would help it shift smoother. I'd keep the F-Deraileur, doesn't make that much of a difference to upgrade. Get a nice wheelset and a good BB/Crankset and you'll be stoked.

  7. #7
    Hi.
    Reputation: jtmartino's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chazb0
    I own a 2008 Yamaha YZ450F and have been riding motocross for five years, so I know how expensive our sports can be.

    I have XT right now on "actually off" the bike. I never liked the way it shifted.

    I might be able to just run what I have, cleaned and lubed up.

    But I do for sure need a new shock.

    Try replacing the cables and housing, and checking the chain, cassette, and chainrings for wear. I guarantee 90% of your problems are from those specific areas, unless the grease has dried out in your shifters or your rear derailleur needs an overhaul.

    The greatest impact on shifting is wear and tear on the chain and gears. The next biggest impact is cable/housing friction. The most important part in ensuring "crisp" shifting are the shifters themselves.

    As far as a fork is concerned, you can either pick something used up off craigslist or ebay, buy new, or get yours rebuilt. New seals and oil is probably around $60 - a full overhaul is closer to $100. Make sure you pick up something around the original fork's travel, which was 80mm if you have the Bomber Z-5.

    What exactly is wrong with the fork?

  8. #8
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    The shock is not the B-5. I went through schematics on Marzocchi's site and it looks like something much older.

    The seals were blown, and the forks wouldn't hold air for very long. Also oil only came out of one side. This is not the type of shock that has a spring in one side and air in the other. This is totally an air shock and does not seem as sophisticated as newer forks.

  9. #9
    Hi.
    Reputation: jtmartino's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chazb0
    The shock is not the B-5. I went through schematics on Marzocchi's site and it looks like something much older.

    The seals were blown, and the forks wouldn't hold air for very long. Also oil only came out of one side. This is not the type of shock that has a spring in one side and air in the other. This is totally an air shock and does not seem as sophisticated as newer forks.
    Yeah I didn't say B-5, I said Z-5, the fork that came stock on the 2000 cinder cones. Decent fork for the price, but not as good as today's offerings.

    The rebuild it needs is probably $60 to $80 depending on your LBS. You can find something used and better for around $150.

  10. #10
    No talent hack
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    Get older more era appropriate XTR stuff and the price isn't going to be bad at all. I ride a 2001 Trek STP 200 with XTR shifter/brake levers, v brakes, and rear derailleur with an XT front. All my parts are from 1997-2002 era and can be had for pretty cheap. A lot has changed, but just getting back into it (like I am) and you will love all the XTR just as you remembered it... then you will be ready to replace the bike with a more modern one anyway. I would love to get a a st of SLX or XT Hollowtech cranks, but that is in my future list before I get a new bike... I think... or maybe I will just get a new bike?

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