1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    18

    1999 GT Avalache... scrap or rebuild?

    Hey guys,

    I'm kind of attached to this frame, plus it seems still lighter than anything I can get in my price range ($1000 max) if I look into getting a new or used complete bike.

    The parts that mostly need replacing on the bike are the fork (ancient Rockshox Duke Race fork), chain and cables, outer and middle chainrings on the crankset, and rear deraileur. I would also like to replace rear brake, handlebars, and brake levers, but it's not a life or death situation.

    I feel like I'm looking at spending between 350-600 dollars on low and mid range components to turn this frame into a very decent commuting + weekend warrior machine. Thoughts?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    107
    if the frame is in good condition and you'd rather save some money then sure, and your not to terribly hard on bikes, why not rebuild it. if you plan using and abusing, then i would put that money to a new bike, or a used newer bike than what you have now.

    what i would do is get a new bike. For me, new is used, but it'd be a 2006 or newer model for as cheap as i could, browse Craigslist in local and areas you wouldn't mind to drive to pick up a bike, be sure to get as much info as possible about it though so that you don't end up buying something that will take more money dumped into it to fix something that you didn't know about. Pinkbike.com also has a good rep, tha'ts where i would start, you can get them cheap there because many people on there are buying new bikes and need to make room so they sell there old bikes cheap to get them out of the way.

  3. #3
    Flow like water
    Reputation: DavyRay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    711
    You mentioned using it as a commuter bike. One point of reference: I bought a 2011 Kona Dew a few months ago. It was $410 at my LBS. I like vintage stuff, but sometimes you have to really figure up your costs. I also just have about enough time to clean, adjust and lube the bikes in the house now. A rebuild project would take away from my riding time.

    At this point, I'd rather ride more and not spend so much time on projects. Everyone's situation is different, though, and projects are fun.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: theMeat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    4,631
    Could buy a used bike, ideally with cheap frame and good parts that you could switch over to your frame. Think when you add up all the parts you'd need $ wise and also time/research for the best parts and price wise, it'd just be faster and cheaper.
    Round and round we go

  5. #5
    no trees are safe
    Reputation: Millfox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    491
    If you like the frame than rebuild it.

  6. #6
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    14,266
    OP - sounds like a plan.

    Some things I'd be looking at as possible sources of problems:
    -Headset size. Probably already 1-1/8" threadless, which is fine. If it's something else, may be a problem.
    -Brake type. This is probably the biggest real change in current bikes. Disc brakes are ubiquitous on mid-level and high-end bikes now.
    -Fork travel. If you have one of the really short-travel forks, like a 63mm fork, a new fork will make your bike's geometry weird. If you have an 80mm fork, get a new fork that can be reduced to 80mm if you're not happy with it at full length. Note that using a longer fork than what the bike was designed for puts extra stress on the head tube, but I don't think people have problems with this in practice until they do something really ridiculous, like a DH fork.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JoePAz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,202
    Quote Originally Posted by kendobari View Post
    Hey guys,

    I'm kind of attached to this frame, plus it seems still lighter than anything I can get in my price range ($1000 max) if I look into getting a new or used complete bike.

    The parts that mostly need replacing on the bike are the fork (ancient Rockshox Duke Race fork), chain and cables, outer and middle chainrings on the crankset, and rear deraileur. I would also like to replace rear brake, handlebars, and brake levers, but it's not a life or death situation.

    I feel like I'm looking at spending between 350-600 dollars on low and mid range components to turn this frame into a very decent commuting + weekend warrior machine. Thoughts?
    Why junk a perfectly good frame? 600 on parts will give you a better bike than $600 on complete bike.
    Joe
    2003 KHS Alite 4000 26" Hardtail - XC, All mountain, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •