1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    25

    '10 hardrock sport disc vs. '02 Trek Fuel 98

    Hey everyone...i'm just getting into the sport and am looking for some advice. There are two bikes i've found locally, and i'm going to purchase one of them....i just need your help to decide which one is the best deal.....

    The first one is a 2010 Specialized Hardrock sport disc, all stock components, excellent condition. He wants $375 for it.......

    The next one is a 2002 Trek Fuel 98.....rock shox all around, duke fork just rebuilt, bontrager seatpost, Selle Italia Flight titanium saddle, Stem and handlebar. This one is missing tires, cables ( brake & shift ) and a chain. He wants $250 for it...



    So what do you more experienced riders think?

  2. #2
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    13,936
    Hard one.

    I don't think the Hardrock is worth $375. Granted mine is older, but it was a little higher trim line and retailed for $660. Offer him $250, maybe? It's still a little high, but it could take a long time if you wait for him to come down to a more reasonable valuation, and someone else might by it first.

    Do some research on the Trek. Not all rear suspension designs have aged well, or were ever good. Not sure where the '02-era Fuel falls on that spectrum. Worthwhile tires are fairly pricey. Cables, housings and chains are all relatively cheap, but you're probably going to bring the cost of this bike at least up to the Hardrock by the time you have it ridable.

    Finally, neither bike is a good idea if it doesn't fit you. Which is a big problem with the Trek - buying used bikes is already a little tricky; when you can't test-ride them it's worse.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    25
    Thank you for the info, it's a huge help. I didn't realize the hardrock was overpriced....i'm very glad i asked here first. I'm leaning a little more toward the Trek. The guy is very nice and seems very knowledgable. He offered to help show me how to put it all together....it's a large frame, which technically "fits" me. I'm just on a limited budget and i've heard the Trek is a great bike.....he originally had just the frame set posted for $250, but when i contacted him and told him this would be my first bike....he offered to me all of the other components along with it. including a basic wheel set...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •