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  1. #1
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    Will sour beers supplant IPAs in the mountain biking community?

    Interesting article. Thoughts?

    A Brief History of Sour Beer : The New Yorker

  2. #2
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    No. Interesting article. But, IMHO sours will not be what knocks off IPAs as the MTB community favorite.
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  3. #3
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    Didn't read the article because I'm lazy, but I did spend an evening sampling the offerings at a local sour beer brew pub, and I was not a fan. Felt more like wine than beer. Not bashing sour beers though, everyone has their preferences. Just doesn't feel/taste like beer.
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    I hope not.

    I can appreciate a sour, but I'll take the IPA 99/100 times.

  5. #5
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    One vote here for Sours > IPA's.
    Ride Bikes, Drink Craft Beer, Repeat.

  6. #6
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    That's a fantastic article...the author really knew his stuff. Still can't believe he dropped the little gem from Bend!

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    Great article, very well put together. Wish he would have given just a bit more credit to the efforts of Tom Peters, whom had a great relationship, and was a driving force behind introducing Belgian beers (specifically sours) to the United States.

    Will sours dominate over IPA's...highly doubtful.
    I love sours, more so than IPA's, but feel that most palates/mind-sets have a hard time taking to them.
    They'll continue to grow in popularity, and with the resurgence of some of the lesser sour styles of wild yeast beers (like Berliner Weisse), more will/should grow accustomed.
    A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. - Winston Churchill

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    I can't imagine sitting on the tailgate after a ride and enjoying a refreshing sour beer but stranger things have happened. I used to think pale ale was too bitter about ten years ago, now I drink IPA like water.

    Secondly, I don't know if my gut will ever be trained to appreciate Brett. Even a little sours and the next day is full of what we have named "Brett Butt".

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    Hmmm, this has intrigued me. I am now going to seek out and try some of these sour beers.

    I'll post back with my post-beverage thoughts, but I'm not anticipating a sour being able to take the place of an IPA...

  10. #10
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    I highly doubt that sours will become the next big beer style. I think it's more likely to have a comeback of other session style brews. While I think the citrus notes of some IPAs can be refreshing post ride, I don't think the sours have that same effect. I think dry pucker mouth instead of refreshing awe. Also, some sours and belgians have yeast on the bottom of the bottles which can be uncomfortable for some if swallowed. If anything will have an effect on pushing aside IPAs it will be the cost of hops. The aside to that is a resurgence of other hop varieties, which is good. I look for more ESBs. I like an IPA, but ESBs are like a long island in that they are full of hop flavor but without the alpha acid bite that some IPAs have.
    I don't know why,... it's just MUSS easier to pedal than the other ones.

  11. #11
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    Meh, not for me it won't. I love some sours, and definitely love some IPA's, but post-ride, I usually go for something lighter.
    I have constant access to Heady Topper, and it's not a beer for chugging/re-hydrating after a ride. I can't see a sour fulfilling that role either. Fancy/subtle/intense/expensive beers are meant to be appreciated, not slurped on and sloshed around post-ride.
    But that's just me.
    In regards to the article, cool to hear more about Cantillon, but I am so sick of hearing about Hill Farmstead.

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    Neither! Saisons are the new IPAs!

    Each beer has it's place. I can't drink more than a couple sours before my belly goes sour. IPA's all all day long....and a nap.
    It wasn't me

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by willapajames View Post
    In regards to the article, cool to hear more about Cantillon, but I am so sick of hearing about Hill Farmstead.
    Why? Aside from Shaun Hill being antisocial and averse to the common business model, the beer is really damn good. Many beer aficionados would claim it's the best small brewery in the country. Just about everything HF makes is excellent.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by willapajames View Post
    ...but I am so sick of hearing about Hill Farmstead.
    I think Shaun is too
    I get the feeling that he really isn't comfortable with the attention.
    A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. - Winston Churchill

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    Quote Originally Posted by jtmartino View Post
    Why? Aside from Shaun Hill being antisocial and averse to the common business model, the beer is really damn good. Many beer aficionados would claim it's the best small brewery in the country. Just about everything HF makes is excellent.
    Absolutely, he makes fantastic beer. Just tired of people worshiping the guy.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by willapajames View Post
    Absolutely, he makes fantastic beer. Just tired of people worshiping the guy.
    Ah good call. He's gonna have some serious competition all over America soon, so hopefully his reputation calms down a bit. Sante Adairius and Ale Apothecary are almost on par with Hill Farmstead, not to mention numerous other small operations across the map 

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    Quote Originally Posted by jtmartino View Post
    Ah good call. He's gonna have some serious competition all over America soon, so hopefully his reputation calms down a bit. Sante Adairius and Ale Apothecary are almost on par with Hill Farmstead, not to mention numerous other small operations across the map 
    By the way, don't forget about the Alchemist. Heady Topper is all they have room to make at the moment, and they can't even keep up with that. But they are definitely not a one-trick pony. I've had the privilege of trying several of John Kimmich's beers (back in the brewpub days, and recently as well), and every one of them was as mind-blowing as Heady.

  18. #18
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    And on the west coast, don't forget Logsdon Farmhouse Ales right outside Hood River, OR. David Logsdon (co-founder of Full Sail and Wyeast) and Charles Porter are making some unbelievable brett beers using all local ingredients, including a belgian sour cherry they cross-bred and grow on the farm.

    Totally worth the trip, and you get to ride all the great stuff in the Hood as a bonus!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by willapajames View Post
    By the way, don't forget about the Alchemist. Heady Topper is all they have room to make at the moment, and they can't even keep up with that. But they are definitely not a one-trick pony. I've had the privilege of trying several of John Kimmich's beers (back in the brewpub days, and recently as well), and every one of them was as mind-blowing as Heady.
    I knew the Alchemist made amazing beer before but I haven't heard of them wanting to make anything other than Heady since the storm damage. At this point it's not a huge deal since they can't make nearly enough Heady to keep up with the demand, and you Northeasterners have plenty of other good stuff to keep you busy .

    Quote Originally Posted by GeePhroh View Post
    And on the west coast, don't forget Logsdon Farmhouse Ales right outside Hood River, OR. David Logsdon (co-founder of Full Sail and Wyeast) and Charles Porter are making some unbelievable brett beers using all local ingredients, including a belgian sour cherry they cross-bred and grow on the farm.

    Totally worth the trip, and you get to ride all the great stuff in the Hood as a bonus!
    Logsdon is great, but I didn't think Cerasus was as good as it should have been. It was kind of a weak execution of a cherry flanders. Their neighbors at Cascade are making better sours IMO. That said, Logsdon's Peche 'n Brett, while expensive, is a great beer. So is the Oak-Aged Bretta and Seizoen Bretta. Their whole business model is fantastic too.

    Wild ales and brett beers are getting really popular in Oregon right now. Here's a cool article about it:

    Oregon's Wild | General | Portland Mercury

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    Quote Originally Posted by jtmartino View Post
    I knew the Alchemist made amazing beer before but I haven't heard of them wanting to make anything other than Heady since the storm damage. At this point it's not a huge deal since they can't make nearly enough Heady to keep up with the demand, and you Northeasterners have plenty of other good stuff to keep you busy .
    John is still making some of his old beers on the side for staff/personal things, and actually has a few kegs kicking around from before the flood. I got to try a 2 year old cherry lambic ("petite mutant") last year and it was fantastic. They've had a growler-filler project in the works for months now, with the intention to do small, unannounced batches of non-HeadyTopper. Waiting on parts apparently. But it'll be worth the wait.

  21. #21
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    The only problem with sours is there are not enough breweries making them.
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    Probably because it's difficult to make them consistent. It's not like you can just throw in a bunch of hops, come up with a clever name, and sell ANOTHER IPA. Sours seem to be much more difficult to get right, and do so one batch after another.
    Anyway, the more the merrier! Sours, stouts, 5xIPA, whatever! It's a great time to be a beer drinker!

  23. #23
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    Re: Will sour beers supplant IPAs in the mountain biking community?

    I had some "Stupid Sexy Flanders" from Sun King yesterday. Really tasty, I could see myself drinking one after a ride, but then I'd switch to IPA...

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by willapajames View Post
    cherry lambic ("petite mutant")
    There is more coming soon
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  25. #25
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    No.

  26. #26
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    Is there a decent sour out there that would be readily available in a reasonably stocked Oregon beer store? I tried one of New Belguims and wasn't impressed, but I generally dislike all NB stuff.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by JFryauff View Post
    There is more coming soon
    I know all about it and then some.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bipolarbear View Post
    I had some "Stupid Sexy Flanders" from Sun King yesterday. Really tasty, I could see myself drinking one after a ride, but then I'd switch to IPA...
    I know nothing about that beer or Sun King but A+ on the name.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slow Danger View Post
    Is there a decent sour out there that would be readily available in a reasonably stocked Oregon beer store? I tried one of New Belguims and wasn't impressed, but I generally dislike all NB stuff.

    Here in Bend, you can find Ale Apothecary and Logsdon (at The Brew Shop)

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirt farmer View Post
    Here in Bend, you can find Ale Apothecary and Logsdon (at The Brew Shop)
    Go for Bend Brewing's Ching Ching - it's much, much cheaper and pretty approachable for the style. Logsdon, Ale Apothecary and Cascade all make delicious Oregon sours, but damn are they expensive at $30 a bottle each. Not only is Ching Ching often available (at least in Bend), it just won gold at the GABF. The brewer who created Ching Ching, Tanya Cornett, is now over at 10 Barrel and just starting to make some sours there. Coincidentally, 10 Barrel won gold for a sour too.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by bipolarbear View Post
    I used to think pale ale was too bitter about ten years ago, now I drink IPA like water.
    You sound like me. My friends all ask about IPA when we are at a Brew House and see me drinking them like H20, so they try some and go back to their "wheat/Amber" brew and tell me that I am crazy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LittleBitey View Post
    I know nothing about that beer or Sun King but A+ on the name.
    Right?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jtmartino View Post
    Go for Bend Brewing's Ching Ching - it's much, much cheaper and pretty approachable for the style. Logsdon, Ale Apothecary and Cascade all make delicious Oregon sours, but damn are they expensive at $30 a bottle each. Not only is Ching Ching often available (at least in Bend), it just won gold at the GABF. The brewer who created Ching Ching, Tanya Cornett, is now over at 10 Barrel and just starting to make some sours there. Coincidentally, 10 Barrel won gold for a sour too.
    Well, if Ale Apothecary and Logsdon were representative of the cost of a good sour then I say, no, sours will never supplant IPA's. But those are a different kind of brewer, so... I've seen a few sours around in the $10 per bottle range. I'll try Ching Ching if I feel like splurging. Thanks for the tip.

  34. #34
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    Kinda surprised no one's mentioned Duchesse de Bourgogne--I think that was the first 'proper' sour I tried. NB's had some great sour batches, as was mentioned they are hard to QC and keep the same--the stuff is wild, after all. A number of years ago I tried a few of the individual batches and they ranged from fruity to palate destruction, was pretty interesting.

    I'd agree many sours are more like a wine, or good ones I think of even more like champagne, but they won't replace IPA's, porters, or wheats in their roles after riding for me. I rarely want more than a taster of any sour, but in small doses I love them.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by JFryauff View Post
    Great article, very well put together. Wish he would have given just a bit more credit to the efforts of Tom Peters, whom had a great relationship, and was a driving force behind introducing Belgian beers (specifically sours) to the United States.

    Will sours dominate over IPA's...highly doubtful.
    I love sours, more so than IPA's, but feel that most palates/mind-sets have a hard time taking to them.
    They'll continue to grow in popularity, and with the resurgence of some of the lesser sour styles of wild yeast beers (like Berliner Weisse), more will/should grow accustomed.

    Sadly, most people outside of Philadelphia have no idea who Tom Peters is.
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slow Danger View Post
    Well, if Ale Apothecary and Logsdon were representative of the cost of a good sour then I say, no, sours will never supplant IPA's. But those are a different kind of brewer, so... I've seen a few sours around in the $10 per bottle range. I'll try Ching Ching if I feel like splurging. Thanks for the tip.
    I think Ching Ching is around $6/bottle now. When it first came out, it was $4, which is how much Berliner Weisse's should cost .

    The best sours on the planet are made by Cantillon, and rarely do they sell beer for more than $10 or 12 USD.

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    Will sour beers supplant IPAs in the mountain biking community?

    Quote Originally Posted by bipolarbear View Post
    Right?
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  38. #38
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    Berliner Weisse is actually the perfect post ride beer. Thirst quenching with nice tartness (not "sour") and low ABV.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtmartino View Post
    Wild ales and brett beers are getting really popular in Oregon right now. Here's a cool article about it:

    Oregon's Wild | General | Portland Mercury
    That new brewery in Tillamook, De Garde Brewing, sounds pretty intriguing.

  40. #40
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    I don't know if Sours will supplant IPA's but it's inevitable that IPA will wane. I personally think IPA's will fade but still be very popular. People will start experimenting with other styles and find their own favorites. It will become more like wine selections. I'm already seeing this at growler pubs. They are getting beers in from all over the US. They have local favorites on tap, but honestly, most of the seasoned beer drinkers try beers they can't readily get on tap at the local pub. IPA's still outpace other beers poured. Even then there are different sub styles in IPA's and I think the line of what is a IPA is being blurred.

    No matter what, it's a good time to be a beer drinker and I doubt it's going to change anytime soon.

  41. #41
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    I prefer IPA

    Here in San Diego I really doubt it but I am a fan of both
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    I feel you NB beers cause headaches
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    One nice beer that falls right in between is the White IPA, there is one called Chainbreaker from Oregon
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