• 12-16-2012
    Gordon Shumway
    1 Attachment(s)
    What's your latest homebrew?
    I brewed a Blind Pig IPA clone yesterday and it is bubbling away nicely. The storage room where it's at is at a perfect 68f. What is currently in production at your house?

    Pic added:
  • 12-17-2012
    willapajames
    Just brewed a Belgian Double on Saturday. Partial mash kit from Northern Brewer called "La Petite Orange". It had been a few months since I'd brewed, so it was nice to fill the house with the delicious smells of wort again.
  • 12-17-2012
    trevor_b
    A vanilla porter that's ready to be kegged, and an IPA.
  • 12-17-2012
    NateHawk
    I've got a peach ginger mead that's about ready for its first racking, and then it will be oaked for a couple weeks.
  • 12-17-2012
    Gordon Shumway
    @willapajames - That sounds good, big fan of Belgian's myself. This batch was also my first brew for a few months and it was nice to have that wort smell back! I always find myself a little tipsy by the time I am pitching the yeast and taking the SG reading. :thumbsup:

    @trevor_b - Never had a vanilla porter, you will have to report back on the outcome!

    @NateHawk - I still keep saying "I want to try out making mead" and never get around to it.. peach ginger sounds awesome so you may have inspired me!

    :D
  • 12-17-2012
    NateHawk
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by OCtrailMonkey View Post
    @NateHawk - I still keep saying "I want to try out making mead" and never get around to it.. peach ginger sounds awesome so you may have inspired me!

    :D

    Mead is pretty easy. The honey ain't cheap, though. I think this batch cost me $80 in honey (tupelo honey from FL). For peaches, freestone peaches are WAY easier to use for obvious reasons. I found my last recipe, a blueberry vanilla, to be much easier because the blueberries were just so much easier to handle than peaches.
  • 12-17-2012
    debaucherous
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    Mead is pretty easy. The honey ain't cheap, though. I think this batch cost me $80 in honey (tupelo honey from FL). For peaches, freestone peaches are WAY easier to use for obvious reasons. I found my last recipe, a blueberry vanilla, to be much easier because the blueberries were just so much easier to handle than peaches.

    Sorry in advance about the threadjack:
    Do you do multiple pitches of yeast for your mead? If yes, does it work? I read about some pro mead makers that pitch yeast multiple times (Day one, after fermentation starts to slow, and once more to fully attenuate). The reports are this method gets compelte fermentation in weeks vs months.
  • 12-17-2012
    Gordon Shumway
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by debaucherous View Post
    Sorry in advance about the threadjack:
    Do you do multiple pitches of yeast for your mead? If yes, does it work? I read about some pro mead makers that pitch yeast multiple times (Day one, after fermentation starts to slow, and once more to fully attenuate). The reports are this method gets compelte fermentation in weeks vs months.

    Threadjacks welcome.. I just wanted to get more homebrew chatter going so keep it all coming! Beer, mead, wine, moonshine... :band:
  • 12-17-2012
    NateHawk
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by debaucherous View Post
    Sorry in advance about the threadjack:
    Do you do multiple pitches of yeast for your mead? If yes, does it work? I read about some pro mead makers that pitch yeast multiple times (Day one, after fermentation starts to slow, and once more to fully attenuate). The reports are this method gets compelte fermentation in weeks vs months.

    nope. I've never had a problem getting complete fermentation in weeks with my batches. I choose yeast strains that work well with the temp ranges that I have in the room where my fermenter does its magic. For me, I tend to ferment at around 70F because I don't have a basement and I don't have any cooling gear. I do have dark closets. I am also generous with supplying my yeast with enough nutrient and degassing. I also hydrate my yeast a day or two before pitching it.

    For my blueberry vanilla, I tossed everything into primary and it zoomed through the fermentation. It took me longer to get to bottling waiting for the lees to settle, and at the time I had to rack it from primary into 1gal carboys, which I then bottled from. it was a clumsy process.

    With my peach ginger, I did a primary fermentation that only took about 2 weeks with just the honey, and the peaches and ginger went into secondary. I only got a little additional fermentation and it was slower because whole peaches release their sugars slowly. This one has more residual sweetness than the blueberry vanilla, which went completely dry to around 19-20% alcohol. I don't have a good way to measure the peach ginger, but going by taste, it seems significantly lower in alcohol than my previous batch.

    Also with this batch, I've been super busy and unable to keep on top of it exactly. I left the peaches in secondary for quite a long time after the fermentation finished. It didn't hurt anything. After that, I let it "bulk age" in the fermenter for awhile. Now I'm ready to rack it off of the lees and oak it and that process will probably take about a month if I am on top of things. I'm using sparkolloid to get the lees to settle out better since this is a light colored mead, I want it to be clear.
  • 12-17-2012
    debaucherous
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    nope. I've never had a problem getting complete fermentation in weeks with my batches. I choose yeast strains that work well with the temp ranges that I have in the room where my fermenter does its magic. For me, I tend to ferment at around 70F because I don't have a basement and I don't have any cooling gear. I do have dark closets. I am also generous with supplying my yeast with enough nutrient and degassing. I also hydrate my yeast a day or two before pitching it.

    For my blueberry vanilla, I tossed everything into primary and it zoomed through the fermentation. It took me longer to get to bottling waiting for the lees to settle, and at the time I had to rack it from primary into 1gal carboys, which I then bottled from. it was a clumsy process.

    With my peach ginger, I did a primary fermentation that only took about 2 weeks with just the honey, and the peaches and ginger went into secondary. I only got a little additional fermentation and it was slower because whole peaches release their sugars slowly. This one has more residual sweetness than the blueberry vanilla, which went completely dry to around 19-20% alcohol. I don't have a good way to measure the peach ginger, but going by taste, it seems significantly lower in alcohol than my previous batch.

    Also with this batch, I've been super busy and unable to keep on top of it exactly. I left the peaches in secondary for quite a long time after the fermentation finished. It didn't hurt anything. After that, I let it "bulk age" in the fermenter for awhile. Now I'm ready to rack it off of the lees and oak it and that process will probably take about a month if I am on top of things. I'm using sparkolloid to get the lees to settle out better since this is a light colored mead, I want it to be clear.

    I've always just put a bit of nutrient, adjust pH, add some air, yeast and let it go. I usually add any spice/fruit/flavor after primary. Product is great, but it takes quite a while to get through the ferment.... I'll probably try the multiple pitch method sometime though.
  • 12-17-2012
    NateHawk
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by debaucherous View Post
    I've always just put a bit of nutrient, adjust pH, add some air, yeast and let it go. I usually add any spice/fruit/flavor after primary. Product is great, but it takes quite a while to get through the ferment.... I'll probably try the multiple pitch method sometime though.

    what strain(s) of yeast do you use? I've used D47 and K1V in my recipes because they're good in the temp ranges I have to work with.

    Austin Homebrew Supply
  • 12-18-2012
    debaucherous
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    what strain(s) of yeast do you use? I've used D47 and K1V in my recipes because they're good in the temp ranges I have to work with.

    Austin Homebrew Supply

    I've experimented with various liquid (beer, mead, cider) strains over the years. It seems the yeast variety makes less difference than in beer beer. I've never settled on a favorite.
  • 12-18-2012
    dmboarder
    My last one was a Cherry Bomb Cider. It's bottled, but I will have to pasteurize it in the next day or two to keep from having bottle bombs. It finished at 9.5% with a tart apple and a slight sweet cherry finish. Dangerous.

    I'm gonna do another batch of honey cream ale tomorrow. It's cream ale extract kit that I add some steeped honey malt to for a little extra flavor. It's our go-to after ride beer and is very refreshing.
  • 12-18-2012
    NateHawk
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by debaucherous View Post
    I've experimented with various liquid (beer, mead, cider) strains over the years. It seems the yeast variety makes less difference than in beer beer. I've never settled on a favorite.

    I always get the dry yeast and rehydrate it in a small bottle of must, so I see it churning away when I pitch it. the strains I mentioned are wine yeasts, FWIW.
  • 12-18-2012
    NateHawk
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by dmboarder View Post
    My last one was a Cherry Bomb Cider. It's bottled, but I will have to pasteurize it in the next day or two to keep from having bottle bombs. It finished at 9.5% with a tart apple and a slight sweet cherry finish. Dangerous.

    I'm gonna do another batch of honey cream ale tomorrow. It's cream ale extract kit that I add some steeped honey malt to for a little extra flavor. It's our go-to after ride beer and is very refreshing.

    what was your basic recipe for the cider (no need for any secret ingredient lists or ingredient ratios or anything)? I would like to do a cider or a cyser (apple mead) but the only cider I can manage to find has preservatives in it and I'm not quite ready to buy my own apple press.
  • 12-19-2012
    dmboarder
    No problem, it's not some crazy secret concoction. I basically used a variation of UpstateMike's Carmel Apple Cider from Homebrewtalk.com. For mine, I put a gallon of the fresh cider from Sam's and 2 of the 96 oz Member's Mark Apple Juice into the bucket. Then, you pour half of two bottles of the MMAJ into the bucket and put 1.5lb of dextrose into the bottles and shake until it's dissolved. Pour that into the bucket and then add one more 96oz bottle and one 64oz bottle of store brand apple juice. I then put a can of the Vintner's Harvest Sweet Cherry Puree and mixed well with my cordless drill and the wine mixer thing. That aerated it pretty well, too. I pitched one pack of Nottingham that I had re-hydrated in some water for 15min and airlocked it. After a few days, there was virtually no activity and I got worried. Seems I should have put the cherry puree in after it was fermented since there's apparently something in it that inhibits. I used some of the mixture and started another packet of Nottingham and pitched that into the fermenter. It then took off and started bubbling like crazy. I think the OG was around 1.069 and I let it get to 0.995, which took about 2 weeks. I then racked it to a carboy, using a grain steeping bag as a filter, which was good since there was a lot of cherry peel lees that really made it super cloudy. You leave it in the carboy one day and then make the backsweetening carmel sauce. I boiled for 5 minutes 2C of brown sugar, 2C water, 2 tbl cinnamon extract, 3 tbl vanilla extract, and 1 tbl Watkins butter extract. I made the cinnamon by soaking some cinnamon sticks in spiced rum and the vanilla by soaking vanilla bean (opened and scraped) in vodka. After it cools, you add the carmel mixture and 4 cans of thawed frozen concentrated apple juice to the bottling bucket and then add the juice mixture. Be sure to mix well and stir several time while bottling. When you bottle, be sure to bottle into two plastic Coke type bottles and squeeze the air out of the headspace to be able to gauge carbonation. When it's carbonated, you then have to pasteurize the bottles to prevent them from becoming bombs. All of these procedures are discussed very thoroughly in the thread above.

    As for the cider, I will be pasteurizing tonight, as the two plastic bottles are getting pretty firm. I opened one bottle last night to check it and let my wife drink it. Since I put the cherries in the primary, the cherry flavor is very subtle. You just pick up a tiny bit of cherry sweetness on the finish, along with some apple tart. She said it tasted like a cinnamon roll, and I agree. I would cut the cinnamon down to probably 1 or 1.5 tbl in the next batch and add the cherries later in the process. Overall, it's very tasty, if you like a sweet cider and you can't taste the alcohol at all. Judging from the way her eyes got glassy and red after about half a glass, though, it's definitely in there. :thumbsup:
  • 12-19-2012
    square
    simcoe/amarillo ipa in primary.

    wookey jack clone on deck.
  • 12-20-2012
    Gingerdawg
    Surly Furious clone
    Kate The Great Russian Imperial Stout
  • 12-20-2012
    andy f
    Not beer, but lately I've been drinking a 2009 60% Sangiovese/40% Syrah blend that I made. The Sangiovese came from Dos Ninas vineyard in Gilroy and the Syrah was from Split Rail vineyard in the Santa Cruz Mtns. above Corralitos. Crushed, fermented, and pressed in my garage and aged in a one year old Remond French oak barrel for 16 months. Four day cold soak prior to pitching the yeast.

    I have 16-17 cases left so I'm glad it turned out well. A year ago or so, it wasn't tasting so nice.
  • 12-20-2012
    ndinh
    Kegged a Blind Pig a week ago and it's muy delicioso. Just kegged a Belgian dark ale, brewed with star anise, fresh orange peel and corriander. Can't wait to try that because it smells so good. On deck, a Delerium Tremens clone.
  • 12-20-2012
    Gordon Shumway
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by ndinh View Post
    Kegged a Blind Pig a week ago and it's muy delicioso. Just kegged a Belgian dark ale, brewed with star anise, fresh orange peel and corriander. Can't wait to try that because it smells so good. On deck, a Delerium Tremens clone.

    Nice! I've been wanting to do a Delerium Tremens clone. All grain or partial mash/extract?
  • 12-20-2012
    ndinh
    It'll be all grain. I found this on homebrewtalk:

    All-Grain - Pink Elephant (Delirium Tremens clone) - Home Brew Forums

    It looks tasty.
  • 12-22-2012
    GelatiCruiser
    I have been into homebrewing since somewhere around 2000. I have moved twice in the last few years and just yesterday went to pick up a homebrew kit for a cousin of mine who is looking to get into it. I haven't brewed in about 4 years because...well, I don't really have an excuse other than "life got in the way"...but any way, I went to the local homebrew shop yesterday and ended up scooping a kit for myself. It's a partial, but I'm dusting the gear off and brewing an IPA. After this I'll be doing an Irish Red Ale and a Steam brew. Can't wait! I love brewing beer, especially this time of year.
  • 12-22-2012
    Gordon Shumway
    1 Attachment(s)
    My latest homebrew pour: a Belgian strong golden ale I brewed in 2011. I actually got 2nd in a little local contest with this one, my first contest too. It aged really well but I only have 2 bottles left.

    Bad sideways iphone pic:
  • 12-24-2012
    toezter
    Fade to Black IPA brewed last night, and apple jack today.