Results 1 to 40 of 40
  1. #1
    Plays with tools
    Reputation: customfab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    4,461

    What's your favorite macro beer?

    I love craft beer with the best of them. But some times you just need a easy drinking clean beer. I don't know why but for some reason Olympia stands out from the crowd to me. Must be the water. I just wish it was easier to find.

  2. #2
    i'm schralping yer thread
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    855
    Miller High Life; but only out of a cold tallboy.





    I find that it enhances my supervisory skills.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    421
    Heiniken

  4. #4
    Hi.
    Reputation: jtmartino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    3,868
    Quote Originally Posted by customfab View Post
    I love craft beer with the best of them. But some times you just need a easy drinking clean beer. I don't know why but for some reason Olympia stands out from the crowd to me. Must be the water. I just wish it was easier to find.
    It definitely is the water. They used to have 4 packs of tall boys at Safeway on 3rd for $4. Do they not carry it anymore?? Olympia 95% Malt is pretty good too.

    GeePhroh's got the right idea - High Life isn't too bad. Same with PBR.

    I tried some Coors Batch 19 recently - labeled as a "Pre-Prohibition Style Lager" which was actually pretty good.

  5. #5
    Kitty! Kitty! Kitty!
    Reputation: GelatiCruiser's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,080
    High Life or High Life Light for sure. It ALWAYS sells out at the beer stores near me. Why the hell don't they order more? Dammit!

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: A1an's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,920
    Probably Sam Adams Boston Lager.
    Signature

  7. #7
    Afric Pepperbird
    Reputation: dirt farmer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    4,710
    PBR

    Sam Adams

    Rainier

    Schlitz

    Blatz

  8. #8
    Hi.
    Reputation: jtmartino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    3,868
    Quote Originally Posted by A1an View Post
    Probably Sam Adams Boston Lager.
    SA is still considered "micro", even though they're huge!

  9. #9
    Paper Mill Aleworks
    Reputation: JFryauff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,484
    Goose Island!


    I kid, I kid

    To be honest, the only two macro beers I ever usually come in contact with (usually via my brother-in-law) in Amstel and High Life...with the occasional Stella.
    All of which I have no qualms throwing back if it's around.
    A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. - Winston Churchill

  10. #10
    Hi.
    Reputation: jtmartino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    3,868
    Quote Originally Posted by JFryauff View Post
    Goose Island!
    Touche!

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    4,211
    I'm sorry, but to my mind Sam Adams and New Belgium are macro brewers. I can't find either where I live now, but I'm a fan of both Lonestar and Dixie.

  12. #12
    Paper Mill Aleworks
    Reputation: JFryauff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,484
    Quote Originally Posted by bluestatevirgin View Post
    I'm sorry, but to my mind Sam Adams and New Belgium are macro brewers.
    No worries, but their not.
    Perception of a successful micro/regional brewery being "macro" is a common misconception.
    It's hispter mentality
    A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. - Winston Churchill

  13. #13
    \m/{-_-}\m/
    Reputation: Sun Burn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    723
    High Life for me. When it's hot outside and the bottles or cans are ice cold it just goes down so well.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    4,211
    Quote Originally Posted by JFryauff View Post
    No worries, but their not.
    Perception of a successful micro/regional brewery being "macro" is a common misconception.
    It's hispter mentality
    Ha!. I don't get called a hipster nearly enough. I'm not under any misconception. I understand that mine is not a "technical" definition, though I'm sure somebody is out there making a stronger case than I ever could. However, I do know that no matter what market I walk into in America, I can count on finding two beers: Budweiser and Fat Tire. This means New Belg is cranking out a ton of Fat Tire.

  15. #15
    i'm schralping yer thread
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    855
    Quote Originally Posted by JFryauff View Post
    No worries, but their not.
    Perception of a successful micro/regional brewery being "macro" is a common misconception.
    It's hispter mentality
    Right on! Personally, I like the term "craft" better than "micro" -- that way, you can lump together the New Belgium's and Sierra Nevada's with the "3-barrel-system-in-a-garage" guys.

    Love them or hate them, Sam Adams is a whole different -- and, yeah, I'll say it -- better animal than InBev.

  16. #16
    Paper Mill Aleworks
    Reputation: JFryauff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,484
    Quote Originally Posted by bluestatevirgin View Post
    Ha!. I don't get called a hipster nearly enough. I'm not under any misconception. I understand that mine is not a "technical" definition, though I'm sure somebody is out there making a stronger case than I ever could. However, I do know that no matter what market I walk into in America, I can count on finding two beers: Budweiser and Fat Tire. This means New Belg is cranking out a ton of Fat Tire.
    Hehe...it's nothing personal, just for fun.

    I just don't understand the mentality (hipster or not ) of lambasting a brewery for a well liked product, and successes in their business practices. Given their relatively short life in the American beer scene, having penetrated as well as they have should be respected. Should Fat Tire be everyone's favorite beer? No. It's ability to appeal to such a large number of people, to the point of becoming so widely popular/available, is still a great achievement.

    Don't get me wrong, I understand and appreciate the "local", and "regional" love we share for craft beer products. I guess I just see the country as a whole, with regards to "local" beers. the more the better, and if New Belgium/Sierra Nevada/etc can pave the way...cool.
    A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. - Winston Churchill

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    4,211
    Quote Originally Posted by JFryauff View Post
    I just don't understand the mentality (hipster or not ) of lambasting a brewery for a well liked product, and successes in their business practices. Given their relatively short life in the American beer scene, having penetrated as well as they have should be respected. Should Fat Tire be everyone's favorite beer? No. It's ability to appeal to such a large number of people, to the point of becoming so widely popular/available, is still a great achievement.

    Don't get me wrong, I understand and appreciate the "local", and "regional" love we share for craft beer products. I guess I just see the country as a whole, with regards to "local" beers. the more the better, and if New Belgium/Sierra Nevada/etc can pave the way...cool.
    I hear you. And don't get me wrong, mine is not a precious argument, nor am I lambasting New Belg or Sam Adams. They just brew a lot of gallons of beer...some varieties of which I enjoy immensely. Great beer is great beer. However, I can fault Fat Tire for being pretty awful in its class. I can be mystified by its success, and even suspect that much of the reason for its success is due to distrubution controls/marketing--which enters in to "macro" territory"--though I can only suspect. But I'll digress because I really have no dog in the macro/micro fight.

    Given the choice between Fat Tire and, say, Lonestar, I would have to think twice and check my mood. There's kind of nothing worse, when in a craft beer mood, than settling for Fat Tire because that's what's on the shelf. If I think of Fat Tire as macro, it's easier to drink.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    4,211
    Hey, wait just a cotton-pcikin-minute, JFryauff, you poke fun at me for being a hipster when there's an entire thread up right now about your monthly fancy-pants beer and food pairings? Isn't that like the hipster calling the bike messinger hip or something?

  19. #19
    Paper Mill Aleworks
    Reputation: JFryauff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,484
    Quote Originally Posted by bluestatevirgin View Post
    Hey, wait just a cotton-pcikin-minute, JFryauff, you poke fun at me for being a hipster when there's an entire thread up right now about your monthly fancy-pants beer and food pairings? Isn't that like the hipster calling the bike messinger hip or something?
    Called you a hipster...but never said I wasn't one
    A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. - Winston Churchill

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    4,211
    Quote Originally Posted by JFryauff View Post
    Called you a hipster...but never said I wasn't one
    You're lucky I don't live in Philly. I'd be inviting myself over to your next gathering.
    Last edited by Slow Danger; 10-15-2012 at 10:42 PM.

  21. #21
    Hi.
    Reputation: jtmartino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    3,868
    In order to be "micro," the brewery has to make less thatn 6M barrels of beer a year. Last time I checked Boston Beer Co. makes just under 2M barrels per year.

    I like the term craft as well, until the big boys start using it to describe beers like Blue Moon. On the other hand, Goose Island makes some awesome beer.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    101
    I've been enjoying double cans of High Life and Banquet Beer on the train ride home lately. Can't beat $2.25 a can at the station's CVS! Usually just pick the coldest regardless of brand...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What's your favorite macro beer?-img_0448.jpg  


  23. #23
    Plays with tools
    Reputation: customfab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    4,461
    Quote Originally Posted by jtmartino View Post
    SA is still considered "micro", even though they're huge!
    I believe they bumped the volume cap for craft beer up to 3 million barrels. Just for the Boston Beer company (sam Adams) and Sierra Nevada who had surpassed the old 'craft' boundary of 1 million bbls.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    4,211
    Quote Originally Posted by jtmartino View Post
    In order to be "micro," the brewery has to make less thatn 6M barrels of beer a year. Last time I checked Boston Beer Co. makes just under 2M barrels per year.

    I like the term craft as well, until the big boys start using it to describe beers like Blue Moon. On the other hand, Goose Island makes some awesome beer.
    Yeah, these definitions are a bit of a rabbit hole though. This thread got me looking around the interwebs, and there's about a hundred different versions of what is or isn't micro. I read 2 million barrels a number of times. 6 million seems like too large a number. I found so many different definitions that I decided that micro is in the eye of the beholder, but has to be defined by number of gallons. Craft beer is a bit of a tricky definition as well, and may have less to do with numbers and more with methods. I too prefer it.

    Edit: New Belg actually claims they are "macro" but also "craft". At least that's how I read their explanations. See frequently asked questions on micro and craft under the heading "business":

    New Belgium Brewing - Age Verification
    Last edited by Slow Danger; 10-15-2012 at 09:06 PM.

  25. #25
    Hi.
    Reputation: jtmartino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    3,868
    Quote Originally Posted by bluestatevirgin View Post
    Yeah, these definitions are a bit of a rabbit hole though. This thread got me looking around the interwebs, and there's about a hundred different versions of what is or isn't micro. I read 2 million barrels a number of times. 6 million seems like too large a number. I found so many different definitions that I decided that micro is in the eye of the beholder, but has to be defined by number of gallons. Craft beer is a bit of a tricky definition as well, and may have less to do with numbers and more with methods. I too prefer it.

    Edit: New Belg actually claims they are "macro" but also "craft". At least that's how I read their explanations. See frequently asked questions on micro and craft under the heading "business":

    New Belgium Brewing - Age Verification
    The 6 million number is recent, as established by the American Brewer's Association. New Belgium's website is actually out of date. NB's website (that you linked to) even references the second link below, which clearly states 6 million barrels.

    Brewers Association | American Craft Brewer Definition

    CraftBeer.com | Craft Brewers are Small, Independent, Traditional

    The term "craft" has become more popular than "micro" in recent years, particularly because breweries like Boston, Sierra Nevada, Deschutes, New Belgium, etc. are anything but small. But the number is still defined, even if it has changed within the past year.

    So there you have it, Pretty clear that "micro" and or "craft" are most readily defined as 6 million barrels or less. In fact, Deschutes Brewery also brings up the 6 million barrel number on tours of their brewery. Just in case you wanted to go check it out and hear it from the horse's mouth .

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    4,211
    Quote Originally Posted by jtmartino View Post
    The 6 million number is recent, as established by the American Brewer's Association. New Belgium's website is actually out of date. NB's website (that you linked to) even references the second link below, which clearly states 6 million barrels.

    Brewers Association | American Craft Brewer Definition

    CraftBeer.com | Craft Brewers are Small, Independent, Traditional

    So there you have it, Pretty clear that "micro" and or "craft" are most readily defined as 6 million barrels or less. In fact, Deschutes Brewery also brings up the 6 million barrel number on tours of their brewery. Just in case you wanted to go check it out and hear it from the horse's mouth .
    Oh, I certainly wasn't questioning your authority, Jmartino. Seriously, though, I was just pointing out all the different views on the interwebs. I saw the 6 million number, on New Belg's site and elsewhere, and recognized it was considered a standard. And I'm also sure--cough, cough--that politics/marketing play no role in establishing those numbers.

    And this is just an open question, but isn't kind of weird to be calling 6 million barrels "small". I'm asking a question, not trying to start anything. But if the Boston Beer Co. only does 2 million barrels, then there can't be many companies doing 6 million. If I remember right, when I was looking around the interewebs, I thought I only saw maybe a handful of companies doing that much beer. I'll do some research when I get time because 6 million barrels must be smaller than I make it seem.

    Edit: Sierra Nevada, Deschutes, & New Belg. together don't brew 2 million barrels. I don't know how/why the Brewers Association came up with 6 million barrels, but it's clearly a ridiculous number meant to appease.

    Final Edit: So I'm no beer geek, but I figured all these distinctions have been hashed out many times across the inter webs and amongst beerficianados. But as I guessed, the 6 million number is clearly political, about marketing, and to help claim strength of beer sales while avoiding taxes. Any brewer who is touting the 6 million number to help sell their beer is clearly playing a game in order to protect their reputation. If Deschutes is really bringing that number to show people, then they stand accused. But, ultimately, it doesn't really matter to me, other than it's a stupid number: Ratebeerians » How Big is “Small”?
    Last edited by Slow Danger; 10-16-2012 at 02:00 PM.

  27. #27
    Beer Me!
    Reputation: Guerdonian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    2,085
    Coors Banquet. That's my go to.
    "Any wheel size is better than sitting at a computer all day." -Myself

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation: GTscoob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    2,275
    Good to see some love for the Champagne of Beers in here! It's been my go-to for some time now. If it's a night of drinking I'll normally start with something classy and end with High-Life.

    Also, Newcastle is available almost everywhere and delicious on tap. Same goes for Yuengling even though I'll never buy it to stock at the house.
    Last edited by GTscoob; 10-16-2012 at 11:17 AM.

  29. #29
    Retired User
    Reputation: wbmason55's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    853
    I can drink High Life or Coors on occasion.

    Will not drink Bud, Stella, Labatts or any macro that comes in a green bottle. <a href="http://media.photobucket.com/image/vomit smiley/faeini1/smiley_emoticons_klokotzen-1.gif?o=24" target="_blank"><img src="http://i279.photobucket.com/albums/kk143/faeini1/smiley_emoticons_klokotzen-1.gif" border="0"></a>

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    435
    Whatever is coldest, because if I'm drinking a beer like that it's hot and I'm thirsty. I've never had a PBR. One of these days I'll grab one, problem is that I've only seen it in 24 packs and I'm just not willing to make that kind of commitment.

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    664
    The 6 million barrel mark it to give the breweries room to grow without including the actual macros.For instance, in this exciting age of unprecedented growth of craft beer, why would you set the bar just over where you are now? NB and Boston Beer, whether you like their beer or not, are big players in the brewers association and their guilds. The amount of money that they pay each year into the BA is determined by how many barrels they sell. Therefore they are incredibly important to the Brewers association's efforts on every level. The brewers association supports craft beer in every way possible, and has made huge strides in pushing for craft friendly legislation is many states.

    BTW Boston beer might be big, but they are not evil. During a recent shortage of certain hop varieties, they offered to sell back much of their supply to craft brewers at their cost (which is much less than the average brewery's cost because of their bulk discounts).

    With that said, my go-to Macro is PBR, they won a gold medal recently Not cause I'm a hipster, but because it's the cheapest thing in a 30 pack at the liquor store down the street.

  32. #32
    Hi.
    Reputation: jtmartino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    3,868
    Quote Originally Posted by bluestatevirgin View Post

    Final Edit: So I'm no beer geek, but I figured all these distinctions have been hashed out many times across the inter webs and amongst beerficianados. But as I guessed, the 6 million number is clearly political, about marketing, and to help claim strength of beer sales while avoiding taxes. Any brewer who is touting the 6 million number to help sell their beer is clearly playing a game in order to protect their reputation. If Deschutes is really bringing that number to show people, then they stand accused. But, ultimately, it doesn't really matter to me, other than it's a stupid number: Ratebeerians » How Big is “Small”?
    Of course it's about those things. Why else would there be a distinction between craft brewers and macro brewers if not for political (money) and marketing (money) reasons?

    And Deschutes advertises the fact that they are a craft brewery to put things into perspective since they are a large brewery - one of the biggest craft breweries in the country. If you're not a beer geek, and unless you're an employee of a macro brewery, why would you say "they stand accused?" Did they do anything wrong?

    Furthermore, why are you implying that the efforts of the Brewers Association are wrong and/or worth criticizing? Even the link you provided builds a case in defense of the 6 million barrel number. Did you read the whole article?

    It seems like you are formulating an opinion about the merits of the "craft beer" distinction and the 6 million barrel limit without understanding really anything about the industry or economy of micro vs. macro producers.

    Sorry customfab, we can start a new thread if you'd like.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    4,211
    Quote Originally Posted by jtmartino View Post
    Of course it's about those things. Why else would there be a distinction between craft brewers and macro brewers if not for political (money) and marketing (money) reasons?

    And Deschutes advertises the fact that they are a craft brewery to put things into perspective since they are a large brewery - one of the biggest craft breweries in the country. If you're not a beer geek, and unless you're an employee of a macro brewery, why would you say "they stand accused?" Did they do anything wrong?

    Furthermore, why are you implying that the efforts of the Brewers Association are wrong and/or worth criticizing? Even the link you provided builds a case in defense of the 6 million barrel number. Did you read the whole article?

    It seems like you are formulating an opinion about the merits of the "craft beer" distinction and the 6 million barrel limit without understanding really anything about the industry or economy of micro vs. macro producers.

    Sorry customfab, we can start a new thread if you'd like.
    Ungh, Jmartino. All I was trying to say is that I think it's a silly number that doesn't really make any kind of distinction between macro and micro, craft and not. All the number does is exclude a handful of the "big guys". I wouldn't call that a disntinction that anybody needed made, at least using that number. I've said previously that the "macro vs. micro" is antiquated, and agreed that the definition of "craft" better serves the industry.

    Yes, I read the whole article. I used it to point out the reasons those numbers are being used. The author spends the whole article exposing the number, not building a case, then accepts the number the last paragraph or two. I disagree with the last paragraph because the case made for the majority of the article seemed stronger. It's ok to disagree with a source.

    The "stand accused" is just an expression. I know Deschutes is defensive about its size, and the perception of this within the beer community. If they want to defend themselves using the 6 million number, so be it, but my point only is the number is so astronomical as to not even matter to them. And if a "craft" brewer is defined at under 6 million, then numbers shouldn't matter at all when defining "craft". That was one of my original points. What, do Bud and Miller want to be defined as "craft" beer?

    So let's keep this real simple. I personally believe that if the Beer Association wants to use 6 million barrels as one of it's top distictions between "craft" and not, it's kind of a silly number that doesn't help define "craft" at all. And "macro" barely. To bring it back to the point of this thread, sorry customfab, the distinciton might matter if one could consider, say, Fat Tire a "macro". Since we can't, then maybe someone could vote for "guiness" I suppose, or maybe some of the finer mexican beers. But for US beers, we have, what, Bud, Miller, Pabst, and whatnot. I'm not even sure I can call my two votes, Dixie and Lonestar, "macro" beers at this point, at least based on the number. Edit: Dixie is a "craft" beer, so Lonestar, brewed by Pabst, is my choice.

    Finally, Jmartino, I enjoy a little interwebs back and forth. We've had a couple now. And I'd be glad to engage you whenever the topic suits me, but please notice that I never insinuate that you are ignorant or clueless, or other such insults. In the future, please afford me the same courtesy.
    Last edited by Slow Danger; 10-20-2012 at 12:47 AM.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Bike Whisperer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,214
    Henry Weinhards
    Rainier
    Olympia
    PBR
    (all brewed by Miller)

    Session is my normal easy drinking beer...not micro, not macro...just a good non-adjunct lager

  35. #35
    Hi.
    Reputation: jtmartino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    3,868
    Quote Originally Posted by bluestatevirgin View Post
    Ungh, Jmartino. All I was trying to say is that I think it's a silly number that doesn't really make any kind of distinction between macro and micro, craft and not. All the number does is exclude a handful of the "big guys". I wouldn't call that a disntinction that anybody needed made, at least using that number. I've said previously that the "macro vs. micro" is antiquated, and agreed that the definition of "craft" better serves the industry.
    I don't think you understand why the definition exists, and why it's important. Technically the definition is applied to "small craft", commonly defined as "micro," not simply "craft." 6 million allows everyone who was previously defined as small craft to stay that way, since the previous definition has existed since the 70s. Read this article too - it explains the situation well:

    Brewers Association | Brewers Association Announces Revised Craft Brewer Definition

    Quote Originally Posted by bluestatevirgin View Post
    The "stand accused" is just an expression. I know Deschutes is defensive about its size, and the perception of this within the beer community. If they want to defend themselves using the 6 million number, so be it, but my point only is the number is so astronomical as to not even matter to them. And if a "craft" brewer is defined at under 6 million, then numbers shouldn't matter at all when defining "craft". That was one of my original points. What, do Bud and Miller want to be defined as "craft" beer?
    Deschutes is not defensive about its size. There's nothing to be "defensive" about. But they do want to keep their designation since it affords them tax breaks in a very competitive market. And of course AbInbev and Miller-Coors would want to get the same tax breaks as the little guys This is all about David vs. Goliath in the beer world.


    Quote Originally Posted by bluestatevirgin View Post
    So let's keep this real simple. I personally believe that if the Beer Association wants to use 6 million barrels as one of it's top distictions between "craft" and not, it's kind of a silly number that doesn't help define "craft" at all. And "macro" barely. To bring it back to the point of this thread, sorry customfab, the distinciton might matter if one could consider, say, Fat Tire a "macro". Since we can't, then maybe someone could vote for "guiness" I suppose, or maybe some of the finer mexican beers. But for US beers, we have, what, Bud, Miller, Pabst, and whatnot. I'm not even sure I can call my two votes, Dixie and Lonestar, "macro" beers at this point, at least based on the number. Edit: Dixie is a "craft" beer, so Lonestar, brewed by Pabst, is my choice.
    The whole point of this definition is to help out the little guys. Little being a relative term - a brewery making 2 million barrels isn't exactly small, but it's nowhere near the size of BMC or AbInbev.

    Quote Originally Posted by bluestatevirgin View Post
    Finally, Jmartino, I enjoy a little interwebs back and forth. We've had a couple now. And I'd be glad to engage you whenever the topic suits me, but please notice that I never insinuate that you are ignorant or clueless, or other such insults. In the future, please afford me the same courtesy.
    My apologies if you were offended - I was not trying to be a d!ck, but rather clear up some misinformation. I am doing my part to help educate others regarding one of my passions - craft beer. You seem to be a very opinionated person about beer; unfortunately some of your opinions are not based upon established facts. This thread is one example of your strong, yet misinformed opinions about session beers, the definition of "working class," or the beer brewed by Trappist monks.

    It's great to have opinions, but when you share those with others on the internet, and your opinions oppose facts, or sound a bit crazy to beer-geeks, prepare for some criticism or lively discussion. Sometimes it's hard to have a constructive debate online without stepping on some toes.

    Hopefully after reading the above article you have a better understanding as to why the "small craft brewer" definition is important, and perhaps deduce as to why 6 million isn't that ridiculous of a number given the recent exponential growth in the craft beer sector.

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    18
    genesee Cream Ales, oh yeah!

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SurlyBuckeye's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    42

    ... and if we just ...

    Stroh's or Yuengling...good and cheap
    "Events in the past may be roughly divided into those which probably never happened and those which do not matter."

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    4,211
    Quote Originally Posted by jtmartino View Post
    My apologies if you were offended - I was not trying to be a d!ck, but rather clear up some misinformation. I am doing my part to help educate others regarding one of my passions - craft beer. You seem to be a very opinionated person about beer; unfortunately some of your opinions are not based upon established facts. This thread is one example of your strong, yet misinformed opinions about session beers, the definition of "working class," or the beer brewed by Trappist monks.

    It's great to have opinions, but when you share those with others on the internet, and your opinions oppose facts, or sound a bit crazy to beer-geeks, prepare for some criticism or lively discussion. Sometimes it's hard to have a constructive debate online without stepping on some toes.

    Hopefully after reading the above article you have a better understanding as to why the "small craft brewer" definition is important, and perhaps deduce as to why 6 million isn't that ridiculous of a number given the recent exponential growth in the craft beer sector.
    But you are trying to be a dick. And you know you’re trying to be a dick. And I prefer you just admit it. But since you insist that every opinion has to have a fact, let me demonstrate the many ways in which I'm of the opinion you’re trying to be a dick. From here on out I’ll refer to the evidence as dickish because I really don’t want to break forum rules on bad language.

    1. Thanks for linking to that other thread, jmartino. There, I made no claims about sessions beers nor offered any opinion on them. I initially claimed I had a philosophy I used to help me choose beer. I later learned that my philosophy was almost identical to how sessions beers were defined. Anybody who looks at a beer menu in a brewpub will see the term sessions used. I just wasn’t aware of the philosophy behind the definition. I went out of my way to acknowledge what I was learning as the thread unfolded in order to shoot straight. To look at that thread, and think I was passing misinformation about sessions beer is kinda dickish. There's nothing there.
    2. Except maybe my use of sarcasm when talking about trappist monks. Of course I knew the trappists had nothing to do with sessions beer. Due to my own research, not your edification, I knew that “sessions” was a 20th century construct associated with English Pubs and started most likely during WWI. I even linked to articles before using the sarcasm. As I was speaking to jamartino, the king of all beer knowledge, I assumed you would get my sarcasm because I was making a point about the internet by making a claim about sessions beer that was off by hundreds of years and a couple of countries, not to mention style of beer. But because you had to jump back in to claim I knew nothing about the monks, I realized the sarcasm was lost on you, so I told you plainly that I was being sarcastic. To willfully ignore that, is kind of dickish.
    3. My strong opinion on the working class is based on fact. Beer has a long tradition with the working class that has been traced back to Egypt where slaves were paid in beer. There are tons of articles and books written about the connection between beer and the working class. I’ve spent most my adult life dealing/thinking/writing about working class issues. For me to say beer should be affordable is not “crazy”. Now maybe you think the working class only drinks Bush Light and shoots guns at the empties. If so, that’s kind of dickish. But no self-respecting beer geek would take issue with my claim. You want to spend $20 on a bottle a beer, go right ahead. I never said you shouldn't.
    4. You keep telling me to re-read articles I understood perfectly the first time through. That’s kind of dickish.
    5. You want to educate, but people have a word for folks who would follow them around trying to point out where she/he doesn’t know things. I bet you can guess what that word is.
    6. You are willfully pretending that arguments over brewery size--and ability to maintain beer quality--have not been happening in pubs for the last thirty years. There is an ideological argument at stake when talking brewery size, not just a political one, and much debate amongst beer drinkers about how big is too big. I live in Oregon. I spend quite a bit of time in Bend. Many, many people are asking those questions of Deschutes. You know these type arguments are not about the 6 million barrel number. I have nothing against Deschutes. In fact, I "sessioned" with Mirror Pond this weekend.
    7. Insisting every opinion is based in fact is kind of dickish. Now, if someone is under the “strong opinion” that the President covered up an attack on a Libyan embassy, then that person better have some facts. To start a thread on a mountain bike website: “Here are my rules on buying beer. What are yours?” Facts pretty much unnecessary.

    Now I think I better unsubscribe from this thread because I know jmartino is just going to find a way to accuse me of needing education. I don’t want to be tempted to answer back because insisting on the last word is kind of dickish.

    Please proceed, Jmartino
    Last edited by Slow Danger; 10-24-2012 at 04:44 PM.

  39. #39
    Hi.
    Reputation: jtmartino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    3,868
    Quote Originally Posted by bluestatevirgin View Post
    Please proceed, Jmartino
    Cool, glad you learned something. Now chill out and have a beer, and try to distinguish when someone is sharing facts with you vs. sharing opinions. And calm down, there's no need for name-calling around here.

    Cheers.

  40. #40
    Suburban Redneck
    Reputation: boxman12's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    397
    PBR (as a redneck, not a hipster) or Yuengling Lager.
    I'm not big-boned, I'm a Clyde.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •