Results 1 to 94 of 94
  1. #1
    Family owned
    Reputation: Finch Platte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    14,088

    No good Ok, beer prices are getting stupid

    I was going to hit the new brewery about 20 miles from me- great beer, good atmosphere, but no food. Then I got to thinking: why should I drive all that way, have a couple of beers, buy a growler to bring home, risk a DUI on the way home, all for almost $40? (Growler=$20, 2 beers=$14 plus a $2 or $3 tip. Oh, yeah, plus gas and maybe the $10k+ DUI) That's crazy. I could go to Raley's and buy 4 six-packs (24 beers!) of really good different beers for the same price, plus drink (some of) it at home without repercussions (well, aside from the usual drunken posts ).

    It's stupid. Beer venues are really over-priced, and I'm starting to second-guess my barleypop spending habits. And tipping a buck for someone smiling, turning around and pouring a beer and handing it to me? Jeez.

    I went to a friend's house last weekend and stocked up on the Naughty Native IPA brewed by the local casino (Feather Falls in Oroville). The Grocery Outlet has bombers of this nectar for $4 each. That's a beer-and-a-half for half the price of what the local breweries charge for a freaking pint.

    Has anyone else begun to rebel against the stupid-high prices these places charge? Or am I just old and crotchety?

  2. #2
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    5,879
    Agreed it's overpriced. Just as cocktails and shooters are. But they have to break even financially and it's not an easy business. I mean, it's like McDonald trying to keep up selling only McFlurrys and with a less efficient business model. Go to the strip clubs instead, at least you'll be glad to give them the tip when they turn around
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,918
    I'm thinking yes more and more.

    We just enjoyed some limited run and special brews from the area while my bro in law visited - $12 six packs. Out of curiosity I added the IPA from brewery a mile away from my house. Their 12 pack cans can often be had for $13-14. I had a big smile to have the visitors from NORCAL and Portland find the neighborhood and nearly 1/2 the price beer in the same league.

    Said thing about the brewery in the neighborhood is they've been at it 31 years and feel the competition from all the little upstarts. They probably need silly names and new art. They do stuff like call their Pilsner Pilsner. OTOH, maybe more will start appreciating their great beer at far more reasonable prices.
    ƃuoɹʍ llɐ ʇno əɯɐɔ ʇɐɥʇ

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: darth biker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    440
    If you donít mind poor quality, you can still get a 30pk off Busch Light for $15.95.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jackbombay's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    673
    I quit drinking micro brew a long time ago, them being overpriced was part of that.

    You've got to hand it to them though, they've done a great job of making beer drinking some sort of competition where the person with the most discerning tasting skills "wins".

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,448
    Drink more whiskey.

  7. #7
    RAKC Industries
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    2,336
    Part of the prices depend on where you live.

    Granted still not cheap, even just a random bar is expensive these days. Its not the owners fault though. Licensing, insurance, location, all that overhead is INSANE anymore. Plus the cost of a micro brewery for the equipment itself is crazy, its become a "pastime" to drink micro brews. Demand has gone up, so does price.

    It actually makes me chuckle at the money people will pay for a beer but same people will complain about a $9 day pass for a park that has trails (but many other things to do as well) or haggle a bike shop to save $5 on a $100 part.

    I dont mind it if going with friends/riding buddies. Have a beer or 2 after good day of riding. But hard to find ones I actually enjoy. IPAs are just horrible. So Im much happier with a six pack Modelo, Canoe Paddler or Summer Ale in a cooler and chilling at the trail head.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    Life on a bike doesn't begin till the sun goes down.

    US partner for Ravemen:
    www.rakclighting.com

  8. #8
    passed out in your garden
    Reputation: cmg71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    1,657
    Quote Originally Posted by bitflogger View Post
    They probably need silly names and new art.
    Im always a little wary of silly names/art, plus that all costs money


    Quote Originally Posted by jackbombay View Post
    You've got to hand it to them though, they've done a great job of making beer drinking some sort of competition where the person with the most discerning tasting skills "wins".
    you do have to hand it to them, they've done a great job at turning wankers into beer snobs
    always mad and usually drunk......

  9. #9
    Hi There!
    Reputation: TheGweed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    1,567
    Quote Originally Posted by jackbombay View Post
    I quit drinking micro brew a long time ago, them being overpriced was part of that.

    You've got to hand it to them though, they've done a great job of making beer drinking some sort of competition where the person with the most discerning tasting skills "wins".
    Could not have said it better. Bravo.
    NTFTC

  10. #10
    beater
    Reputation: evasive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,155
    Those prices are stupid. I walk a quarter mile to the brewery and have 48oz for $15. If I fill a growler itís $10.

  11. #11
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    5,970
    I ride 3 miles of singletrack from my driveway to the local brewery's driveway then get beer for free because the owner is a MTBer and likes to keep us trailbuilders well-lubed.

    Life's tough.

    Sinister Bikes
    Wraith Bicycles
    Sunday River Mtn Bike Park
    NEMBA
    Wachusett Brewing Co.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Arebee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    559
    Breweries are popping up everywhere here in CT. The saturation is incredible. I just don't think they can all be sustained, especially when some of the beers are just average. One brewery charges $16 on a growler refill. At $4/pint, it's not really a bargain for beer you take home. Most local breweries around here don't offer food, so beer is their only source of revenue.

    It's not much different in regular restaurants. Most are charging $8+ for a micro/nano pint, and anything over 7% is going in a 12 oz. tulip glass.

    Buying in the store is just as bad. If I buy two 4-packs, I can easily be out $35. I was describing a beer to a buddy and actually said the words, "AND, it's ONLY $11.99 for a 4-pack." Had me scratching my head.

    I've recently gone back to Harpoon IPA. One of my staples from my Boston days. I can get a CASE of loose bottles for less than $27 out the door, and that can last me a couple weeks.
    AreBee

  13. #13
    since 4/10/2009
    Reputation: Harold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    21,142
    It does depend some on where you live. The local brewpub where I used to live in Indianapolis had some nice prices. In the $10 for a growler fill range.

    Now I live in Asheville and prices are generally higher at the smaller places I've visited. But there are so many choices I haven't even scratched the surface on them yet. The bigger places are making prices a bit more competitive, I think. New Belgium, Sierra Nevada, Oskar Blues. New Belgium is the closest big one to me.

    My house is a bit more out of town, though, so anytime I want to go somewhere, it's definitely something I've gotta decide. Wicked Weed has a production facility just a couple miles away, but they don't do tours or a tasting room yet (it is only a couple years old). That's the closest place I'm aware of yet.

    Haven't gotten into growler fills yet. That's a bit more complicated in NC than in IN. In Indiana, pretty much any brewery would fill any growler. Sometimes they might want to put a sticker on, but sometimes not. Here in NC, and especially in Asheville, it seems that most won't fill someone else's growlers. Legally, they can, but there are strict sanitation laws for growler fills, and most don't want to eat up all that time sanitizing the growler you brought in. It seems most places treat growlers in an exchange program. So you buy a growler, and when you bring it back for a fill, they put it into a rack of "dirty" growlers and give you a sanitized one for your fill. I think they essentially just put them in a dishwasher. I'm testing the market, so to speak, and will only get growler fills at places that will fill my existing growlers, or will buy a limited number of growlers from places whose beers I particularly like. So far, I've just been buying beer at the grocery store. And the grocery stores really only carry beer from the larger locals that package their beers, so the selection is somewhat limited.

    I don't get too bent out of shape on prices. If I want something I'm going to drink a good amount of, or I'm stocking up for an event, then I'm going to buy something less expensive, but still tastes decent. If I want a small amount of something for a special occasion, then I'm willing to spend more. It just depends. My wife and I treat wine purchases much the same way. Right now, if I want something less expensive but local, New Belgium is pretty much what I'll buy.

  14. #14
    Family owned
    Reputation: Finch Platte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    14,088
    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    I ride 3 miles of singletrack from my driveway to the local brewery's driveway then get beer for free because the owner is a MTBer and likes to keep us trailbuilders well-lubed.

    Life's tough.

    I'm moving.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    3
    Even more expensive if you develop a taste for aged sours that cost $20-30 for 750ml bottles. I brew my own and have a huge kegerator at home.. but still end up drinking a lot at breweries just cuz its something to do. Also I enjoy the form factor of cans. I'm often too lazy to fill up a growler from my tap. I love being able to just throw a few cans in a cooler and head out the door.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    2,251
    $7 for a pint is ridiculous. Most pints here are $5 and under & most are 20oz imperial. I'd say $3.75-$4.50 is average. Doubles & other high end batches are still <$7 for a 12oz pour. I can get my growler filled at just about any grocery store & there are stores that do nothing but fill growlers for $8 of what's on special. I'm not talking crap, just got a growler of Boneyard RPM for $7.99. There are seemingly countless pour houses that have a $2 pint night, usually Tuesdays. I thought we reached brewery saturation 5 years ago but there is a new one every month & they're all busy. I don't care how good your beer is, if you average $7 a pint I won't be going there.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  17. #17
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    5,970
    Quote Originally Posted by Finch Platte View Post
    I'm moving.
    It's a decent spot.
    Sinister Bikes
    Wraith Bicycles
    Sunday River Mtn Bike Park
    NEMBA
    Wachusett Brewing Co.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: evdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,623
    Growler fills around SD seem to regularly be in the $16-18 range these days even for basic brews. Just a few years ago you seemed to get those for $9-10. It doesn't make sense to pay more for a growler fill than for a six pack of the same beer at retail prices, especially when the brewery doesn't have to pay for distribution and has no middle man.

    Bombers of anything barrel aged are getting out of control too. Modern Times for example seems to have most of their premium bombers at $30. And you probably have to pay a couple hundred $$ to join their beer society for the privilege of getting bent over on bottle prices. I'm sure its good beer but I'm not paying $30, $20 or even $15 for a bottle.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    1,777
    I started brewing my own beer a few years ago. I bought cheap, basic stuff to get going. You can buy a pre-built kit on Amazon for $110 and that includes a batch of beer. I have basically what the kit has, but the one thing I added was a wort cooler for $40.

    The local homebrew store sells pre-made beer recipe kits for $40-50, or you can put together your own for about $35. A 5 gallon batch makes about 52 12 oz. bottles.

    Bottles were easy - I saved some from store buys, and a friend gave me a bunch. I actually started buying a french fizzy water for awhile that came in 750ml wire bail topped bottles. Makes bottling a little easier, and they reseal.

    I'm dead serious, it is fun, easy, and every single one of the twenty or so batches I've made have turned out great, just as good as any bottled microbrew. I made a lager that just killed. I give a lot of it away, and everyone seems to love it. Or they are just kind?

    It helps that my wife loves to make the beer, but she doesn't drink any of it! I still buy beer occasionally when I run out of homebrew, but I'll reach for a homebrew every time if they are in the fridge.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    2,251
    I wonder what the average mtn bike ride cost? Factor in bike cost alone most people are probably in the $20-$30 range per ride. Bike over 5k & you can double that. Factor in gas, gear, beer etc & wow...it's pretty expensive.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  21. #21
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    5,970
    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    I wonder what the average mtn bike ride cost? Factor in bike cost alone most people are probably in the $20-$30 range per ride..
    Only if you buy and throw away a new bike every season.
    Sinister Bikes
    Wraith Bicycles
    Sunday River Mtn Bike Park
    NEMBA
    Wachusett Brewing Co.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    4,337
    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    I ride 3 miles of singletrack from my driveway to the local brewery's driveway then get beer for free because the owner is a MTBer and likes to keep us trailbuilders well-lubed.

    Life's tough.

    Need to be riding more west of me. Can a pack some pulled pork in my camelbak?

  23. #23
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    5,970
    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    Need to be riding more west of me. Can a pack some pulled pork in my camelbak?
    Absolutely!
    And maybe a Bourbon Stout for good measure.

    I finished the final bottle off last night btw.
    Sinister Bikes
    Wraith Bicycles
    Sunday River Mtn Bike Park
    NEMBA
    Wachusett Brewing Co.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    4,337
    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    I wonder what the average mtn bike ride cost? Factor in bike cost alone most people are probably in the $20-$30 range per ride. Bike over 5k & you can double that. Factor in gas, gear, beer etc & wow...it's pretty expensive.
    Yowzer. Your bike needs gas? Bummer. Or gives you gas? Major bummer. 2013 Spec. enduro, $ 2600 or so. 2015 Trek farley, 2,500 or so. $ 20-30 a ride? You are doing it wrong. 2000 spec, now as a commuter, fuji reale, $ 30.00, now a winter commuter. Karate Monkey, at least 10 yrs old, 29, commuter, now bike packer. Surly 1x1, has seen front sus, 1x1, 1x9, 3" tires( thanks slappy) 29er x 2" tires, bike packing, double dinglespeed, rigid front now with 29er studded tires, may go to front sus with 26x 2.8 tires for another bikepacking rig. I live 200yds from great singletrack, can pedal to more than I can rid in a week.

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    4,337
    All you guys buying growlers? Hosers for complaining. MA guy here. No growlers for me. Try some sierra nevada 12 packs. Jacks Abby lagers are $ 10 for some of the seasonal 6 pack tall boys, yes please. Try wine or bourbon if you think beer is expensive. I don't go to bars all that often, so there's that. Look at the price per ounce. Bombers? Not many for me. Sure I get the 4 pack tall cans for $ 12-15 sometimes, but not always. Cases every year of sierra nevada narwhal, bigfoot, and celebration( 3 last year) Waiting in line for hype? Not me. Pedal on.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    2,251
    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Only if you buy and throw away a new bike every season.
    It's certainly relative to how long you keep a bike & how often you ride.

    I was just discussing this with a friend of mine who keeps logs of basically everything. He has a $2600 kona process that he has ridden 130 times over 3 years. That's $20 a ride. He has also put a new carbon wheelset, drivetrain, brakes, a better pike fork and had his shock rebuilt in that time. He put the total cost at 6k= >$46 a ride. I'm guessing that's pretty average for an avid rider.

    I don't keep track of such things & counter'd if you're going to assign a dollar amount per ride you'd have to counterbalance that with a $ value for enjoyment, health, memories etc. Maybe worthy of it's own thread, dunno.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  27. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    2,251
    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    Yowzer. Your bike needs gas? Bummer. Or gives you gas? Major bummer. 2013 Spec. enduro, $ 2600 or so. 2015 Trek farley, 2,500 or so. $ 20-30 a ride? You are doing it wrong. 2000 spec, now as a commuter, fuji reale, $ 30.00, now a winter commuter. Karate Monkey, at least 10 yrs old, 29, commuter, now bike packer. Surly 1x1, has seen front sus, 1x1, 1x9, 3" tires( thanks slappy) 29er x 2" tires, bike packing, double dinglespeed, rigid front now with 29er studded tires, may go to front sus with 26x 2.8 tires for another bikepacking rig. I live 200yds from great singletrack, can pedal to more than I can rid in a week.
    It's going to very per rider for sure. I build a new high end bike frame up every 3 years or so. Not going to say what my last build cost but it was at least 2k more than the previous build to get the same top build & that's taking my time over the winter looking for deals. I'd have to figure out how many days I ride a year but I simply can't put a price on the enjoyment factor for me. I'm single, no kids, no debt, and mtb is my favorite sport going for many years now. There will come a day when I can't ride as hard or get out & explore like I do now so the money into a bike is worth it for me.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation: evdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,623
    Try to calculate a cost for riding if you want, but I see MTB as adding value to your life and creating memories.

    Having beers is enjoyable too, but in excess it only adds pounds and makes your memories hazy. I'd cut beer out long before I'd cut back on MTB. Or any of the other things I spend money on that aren't essential to survival.

    Bikes are a sunk cost. Trying to calculate a cost per ride is pretty pointless as a comparison IMO. You might have only done 100 rides in a certain period in which you could have done 1,000 rides. The only thing that would tell me is that I need to ride more.

  29. #29
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    2,961
    But it's like someone around here's signature says, mountain biking is a lot cheaper than a heart attack from clogged arteries and similar health problems caused by a lack of exercise. Especially if you don't crash and end up in the ER!
    There are two types of people in this world:
    1) Those who can extrapolate from incomplete data

  30. #30
    RAKC Industries
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    2,336
    Cost of bike and its upgrades to suit my preferences I dont keep track of. Still cheaper than annual insurance premiums. Especially before ACA caused prices to go nuts. And major increase coming again (my wifes work is in an uproar over it cause its a BIG one).

    When prices were based on a persons health, my premiums for amazing insurance was crap and deductible was tiny.

    With that in mind, not counting an crash induced injury, being healthier due to riding means less concerns over deductibles having to be paid every year and less out of pocket expenses for doctors visits since they are fewer. As is lack of prescriptions needed.

    In my case I could buy a $6000 bike every 2 years if I dont have to worry about the deductible every year. Not that lucky, but at 3k deductible alone, healthier life style makes more sense.

    Doctor visit once or twice a year. Second is if I get a sinus infection and need antibiotics. $200 a year at most.

    And compared to most of you Im not THAT healthy and in shape, yet anyway. And many here probably work for companies that actually offer decent insurance.

    So bike, gear (initial purchases, not maintenance) to me is a $0 cost each year. And I keep a bike for 3-4 years so far. It keeps me out of the doctors, keeps me eating decently.

    Comes down to cost of fuel to get to trails. $7 max per trip except for the more rare trips that are a couple hours or so away. But those usually go along with a family camping trip.

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    Life on a bike doesn't begin till the sun goes down.

    US partner for Ravemen:
    www.rakclighting.com

  31. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    104
    I've just started visiting the new micro-brew-bars around home, and I don't like the model. If I'm paying $8 or more + tip for a pint, I would at least like it brought to me instead of having to go up and stand and wait for it at the bar. My next gripe is that every time I go back, they have different beers, and half the time I end up spending $8 to $10 for a pint I didn't even like.

    The only reason I go to those places is to get sours. If I wanted an IPA there are 40 different ones at the grocery store for some reason, but I'm tired of only tasting hops especially on a hot day. I'm seeing some sours starting to turn up on shelves, and I'm looking forward to more of that.
    2016 Fuse Pro 29/6Fattie
    2017 Stumpjumper Comp 29/6Fattie

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation: evdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,623
    Just ask them for a taste before you order a pint. If its a place that is that expensive you can probably do half pints or tasters too. And no one is forcing you to tip. But if the staff help you out in picking beers it is probably worth the tip.

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    I started brewing my own beer a few years ago. I bought cheap, basic stuff to get going. You can buy a pre-built kit on Amazon for $110 and that includes a batch of beer. I have basically what the kit has, but the one thing I added was a wort cooler for $40.

    The local homebrew store sells pre-made beer recipe kits for $40-50, or you can put together your own for about $35. A 5 gallon batch makes about 52 12 oz. bottles.

    Bottles were easy - I saved some from store buys, and a friend gave me a bunch. I actually started buying a french fizzy water for awhile that came in 750ml wire bail topped bottles. Makes bottling a little easier, and they reseal.

    I'm dead serious, it is fun, easy, and every single one of the twenty or so batches I've made have turned out great, just as good as any bottled microbrew. I made a lager that just killed. I give a lot of it away, and everyone seems to love it. Or they are just kind?

    It helps that my wife loves to make the beer, but she doesn't drink any of it! I still buy beer occasionally when I run out of homebrew, but I'll reach for a homebrew every time if they are in the fridge.
    This.

    I bought one of those 1 gallon homebrew kits from Barnes and Noble a couple years ago just to try it out. It was an American Pale Ale. The brewing experience was fun and the beer was decent. (not a huge pale ale fan) I enjoyed it enough to invest a little more on equipment to make 5 gallon batches. The beer I like to make is a Belgian Quad from a local homebrew store. 13+% abv. It's a little more costly to make than most beers, but I'm still saving a ton of money by brewing it myself. $85 to buy the ingredients and makes ~26 24 oz bottles. So it's $3.26 per bottle compared to $18-20 from the store.

  34. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    104
    Quote Originally Posted by evdog View Post
    Just ask them for a taste before you order a pint. If its a place that is that expensive you can probably do half pints or tasters too. And no one is forcing you to tip. But if the staff help you out in picking beers it is probably worth the tip.
    Yeah that's what I've been doing, but it just feels cheesy doing that every time especially if it's busy.
    2016 Fuse Pro 29/6Fattie
    2017 Stumpjumper Comp 29/6Fattie

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: evdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,623
    You'll get over it. Go often enough and get to know the staff, it's not a big deal at all.

    If you don't like IPAs try getting them to mix it with a stout. Ballast Point turned me onto that. Can be shockingly good...

  36. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    104
    Quote Originally Posted by evdog View Post
    You'll get over it. Go often enough and get to know the staff, it's not a big deal at all.

    If you don't like IPAs try getting them to mix it with a stout. Ballast Point turned me onto that. Can be shockingly good...
    Maybe. It doesn't seem to bother the bartender after all.

    IPA and stout could be interesting. Still though I'm a sucker for sours now.
    2016 Fuse Pro 29/6Fattie
    2017 Stumpjumper Comp 29/6Fattie

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    104
    Something I'm trying to figure out is the etiquette involved with growlers, and I feel goofy asking. Some of these bars have growler fills that come out WAY cheaper than buying by the pint, but is it proper to get a growler filled and then just use it like a pitcher if you want to stay there?
    2016 Fuse Pro 29/6Fattie
    2017 Stumpjumper Comp 29/6Fattie

  38. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation: WHALENARD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    2,251
    Quote Originally Posted by TNTall View Post
    Something I'm trying to figure out is the etiquette involved with growlers, and I feel goofy asking. Some of these bars have growler fills that come out WAY cheaper than buying by the pint, but is it proper to get a growler filled and then just use it like a pitcher if you want to stay there?
    I'd just ask. Around here "small pitchers" are kinda popular. Where you get about 2 & 3/4 beers for the price of 2 beers. I drink them at the bar all the time but will always tip for 2 beers minimum.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  39. #39
    Beer Please! SuperModerator
    Reputation: Klurejr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    5,500
    Quote Originally Posted by TNTall View Post
    Something I'm trying to figure out is the etiquette involved with growlers, and I feel goofy asking. Some of these bars have growler fills that come out WAY cheaper than buying by the pint, but is it proper to get a growler filled and then just use it like a pitcher if you want to stay there?
    Depends on the State/County/City Booze Laws. In some places Growlers are To-Go only and not allowed by law to be consumed on the premise.
    Ride Bikes, Drink Craft Beer, Repeat.

    Know these before you post:
    MTBR Forum Posting Rules
    e-bike sub-forum rules

  40. #40
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    2,961
    Quote Originally Posted by evdog View Post
    You'll get over it. Go often enough and get to know the staff, it's not a big deal at all.

    If you don't like IPAs try getting them to mix it with a stout. Ballast Point turned me onto that. Can be shockingly good...
    Or just get a stout
    There are two types of people in this world:
    1) Those who can extrapolate from incomplete data

  41. #41
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    5,879
    Just paid $10 for a glass of kombucha and rhum.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  42. #42
    beater
    Reputation: evasive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,155
    Quote Originally Posted by chazpat View Post
    But it's like someone around here's signature says, mountain biking is a lot cheaper than a heart attack from clogged arteries and similar health problems caused by a lack of exercise. Especially if you don't crash and end up in the ER!
    Thatís from something a guy here once said to me: ďno matter how much I spend on bikes, itís cheaper than a cardiologist.Ē

  43. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Arebee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    559
    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    All you guys buying growlers? Hosers for complaining. MA guy here. No growlers for me. Try some sierra nevada 12 packs. Jacks Abby lagers are $ 10 for some of the seasonal 6 pack tall boys, yes please. Try wine or bourbon if you think beer is expensive. I don't go to bars all that often, so there's that. Look at the price per ounce. Bombers? Not many for me. Sure I get the 4 pack tall cans for $ 12-15 sometimes, but not always. Cases every year of sierra nevada narwhal, bigfoot, and celebration( 3 last year) Waiting in line for hype? Not me. Pedal on.
    Just got an email today about this year's Celebration now available here in CT. One of my favorites. I usually drink it all through the winter. Also liking Otter Creek Free Flow IPA in 12 packs.
    AreBee

  44. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mrmattjohnson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    873
    i would rather have a beer at home than over pay for going out. But when i do go out, you are also paying for the atmosphere. However, i get essentially unlimited free beer so i would rather have my buddies over and kick back by the firepit.

  45. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Arebee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    559
    Quote Originally Posted by mrmattjohnson View Post
    i would rather have a beer at home than over pay for going out. But when i do go out, you are also paying for the atmosphere. However, i get essentially unlimited free beer so i would rather have my buddies over and kick back by the firepit.
    After reading this and looking at your avatar, I was wondering if you were connected to Stone. Love Arrogant Bastard, and love Double Bastard even more. So pissed when I found out they aren't making DB this year! I have an 8 year vertical put away in my basement. I was going to drink them with friends when I had 10 years.

    I made a post in a different thread about how I can't find certain "year-round" local beers because the breweries are brewing small batches of every style that's "HOT" at any one time. You've got breweries putting out every style with every hop/fruit combination possible, yet the beers that got people interested in their brewery, are nowhere to be found.
    AreBee

  46. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    78
    Seems like Ballast Point started the premium above $10 a six pack trend. I paid $15 for 6 down the street from the brewery a few years ago. Then last year I'm driving around in the Oregon desert and paid $9 for 6 in Fields, Oregon. Fields is literally the only store within 100 miles. They could ask $20. Then I started in on Snake River Brewery's Pako's IPA. But that's like $12 for 6 locally now. Basically, I've really cut back on my beer drinking. I'd go back to home brewing because I was really good at it, but... I can't ride enough to keep up with all the calories.

  47. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation: demonlarry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    184
    The reason for this post is the same reason my friends and I mainly hang out at one another's houses. Bar prices are getting serious, uber + a 12 pack of good beer is way less than a trip to the bar, or, a DWI.

  48. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    46
    Doing *almost* anything yourself saves money, and adds to one's skillset. Apres ride, if it's summer, I'd rather a few tailgate beers than going and sitting somewhere noisy. Even better is head home for some freshly deep fried tortilla chips, homebrew, and fresh chopped salsa in the back yard. (Obviously, not in the winter...brrr)
    The way I look at it is I cannot refine gasoline, or machine a bottom bracket, so I'm not gonna sweat buying gas, or bike parts, but I can install those parts myself and I can brew a pretty damn good homebrew for about 10% of the cost of buying it out.
    The ironic thing is that in BC, booze is one of the most heavily taxed items you can buy, yet the ingredients to make it are all considered foodstuffs, and therefore have no taxes whatsoever on them.

  49. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    570
    Quote Originally Posted by jackbombay View Post
    You've got to hand it to them though, they've done a great job of making beer drinking some sort of competition where the person with the most discerning tasting skills "wins".
    This has been happening in all kinds of areas for a long time...also applies to the MTB industry.

    Going out to a restaurant/bar/brewery to sit and drink beer has always been more expensive, no? I thought you were paying for ambiance.

    I'm a fan of staying at home and inviting people over to drink but sadly most friends would rather go to a restaurant, bar, or brewery. They all seem to have excess money and limited time.

  50. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Arebee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    559
    Quote Originally Posted by woofer2609 View Post
    Doing *almost* anything yourself saves money, and adds to one's skillset. Apres ride, if it's summer, I'd rather a few tailgate beers than going and sitting somewhere noisy. Even better is head home for some freshly deep fried tortilla chips, homebrew, and fresh chopped salsa in the back yard. (Obviously, not in the winter...brrr)
    We all chipped in $20 and bought a propane fire pit to keep us warm during winter Apres Ride!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Ok, beer prices are getting stupid-firepit.jpg  

    AreBee

  51. #51
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RajunCajun44's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,812
    there is a bar here in phoenix that has 7.5-8% ipas for $5 (tuesdays) for 22 ounce draft... called Casey Jones.. had a few green flashes this past tuesday...

    green flash is 8.1

  52. #52
    Will crash for rim brakes
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    402
    If you look at beer prices, both at the store and at the bar/restaurant, and adjust for cost of living/inflation, they haven't changed in the last 20-30 years. Yes it's more expensive now than then but everything else is too. In the 1990's, Lowenbrau (that I don't see anymore) was $4/six pack, Budweiser (if you can even call that beer) was the same price, maybe $3/six pack and the imported beers like Beck's, St. Pauli Girl, Heineken, etc. were $6/six pack. Now the lower-end beers are $6-8/six pack and most of the better beers, at least the mass-produced ones, are $10-12/six pack. So prices have doubled in the last 20-25 years, just like inflation and the cost of living doubled. Prices have not gone up relative to those factors. In the restaurant/bar, the average beer is $5-6, and 25 years ago it was $3-4, so that's no change either when adjusted, in fact it's gone up less compared with store beers.

    Yes, it's cheaper to drink store beer and go into a bar. Some college friends used to do that a lot. One of them had an out of state expired ID so he had to constantly go to the liquor store and then back to the bar. One night this butch waitress caught him drinking at the very end of the 1 PM last call, I thought she was going to kill him. He was drinking right out of the pitcher; she grabbed it, slammed it down on the table, beer spills everywhere, and she yells get the hell out of my bar. She only had to say it one time. We looked at each other like damn, she means business so we quickly left. That guy used to get in trouble a lot. I'm glad I experienced those days but would not want to relive them now lol.

  53. #53
    Trail Gnome Moderator
    Reputation: griz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    2,967

    Get a keg

    I just got a 5 gallon keg the other day for $59...thatís approx 53 beers, on tap. Iím supporting my local brewery, getting beer on tap, and saving money. My girlfriend brews beer, so we already had the kegerator stuff. Beer prices are definetly out of control. I rarely go out for a beer...itís usually when Iím travelling.

  54. #54
    CEO Product Failure
    Reputation: bingemtbr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    815
    This is exactly why I no longer enjoy "going out". A 6 pack of Stone Enjoy By is $16 (very good price for a very good beer IMO). A 10oz of Stone Enjoy By at the local publik house is $4.5 (good price as well). But add two more beers and a sandwich...and you're at $30.

    We try not to eat out more than once a week--this includes lunches. When we go out together (i.e. date night) we have stopped ordering alcohol. Especially when you taking your 24 and 21 yr old sons to dinner, drinking can kill your budget.

    Also, the same case can be made for food. $12 for a burger? $25 for a steak? You can buy an awful good lump of meat at Costco/SAMs/local IGA for $25-50. And since you're at home, no DUI's.

    Yes, I am joining the ranks of crotchety and cranky old dudes.

  55. #55
    Will crash for rim brakes
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    402
    Quote Originally Posted by bingemtbr View Post
    This is exactly why I no longer enjoy "going out". A 6 pack of Stone Enjoy By is $16 (very good price for a very good beer IMO). A 10oz of Stone Enjoy By at the local publik house is $4.5 (good price as well). But add two more beers and a sandwich...and you're at $30.

    We try not to eat out more than once a week--this includes lunches. When we go out together (i.e. date night) we have stopped ordering alcohol. Especially when you taking your 24 and 21 yr old sons to dinner, drinking can kill your budget.

    Also, the same case can be made for food. $12 for a burger? $25 for a steak? You can buy an awful good lump of meat at Costco/SAMs/local IGA for $25-50. And since you're at home, no DUI's.

    Yes, I am joining the ranks of crotchety and cranky old dudes.
    I do think eating (and drinking) out is the number one reason people go into debt when they don't need to. Once in a while you'll hear people getting some money and blowing it on cars, vacations, etc., but most of the wasted money day by day, month by month, is on restaurants. Both my brother and sister eat out a lot and they are both in debt, and they wouldn't be if they simply cooked at home for all these years. It's a very simple thing to do even if its boring.

  56. #56
    West Chester, PA
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    4,247
    A couple years ago I drove from Philly to Vermont with a buddy to buy a bunch of heady topper. The same winter I wasted a whole pto day driving around my area to find hopslam. I'm DONE going out of my way for beer. If something good is in front of me, I might buy it.

    The "scene" and the jobless people who sit in lawn chairs at beer releases so they can re-sell for profit is played out. My area has multiple brewers canning endless variations of the same goddamn unfiltered IPAs. One of them is even so clever there's no text on their labels, just edgy graphics like a photo of a bearded guy in front of trees. You have to learn to associate the "art" with their even more clever names like "nothing" and "pneumatic spray". But there's no shortage of morons lining up to pay $20 a 4 pack right now. Lol

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,014
    I moved from Boston to Vermont and beer prices are still high here but better than some Boston breweries. I recall paying up to $22 for a 4 pack at Trillium which is just insane. That was also sometimes coupled with waiting a long line. I recall when Lawson's Sip of Sunshine became available in Boston some liquor stores only let you but 1 can and charged $5 for it. F---that.

    Up here I roll down to the local store on Heady delivery days and stock up every couple weeks with usual VT brews. I pay around $12-$14 a 4 pack which isn't too bad. My days of waiting in line for beer are over but I'll still happily pay a bit of a premium considering the quality of beer I am fortunate to get here.
    2016 Santa Cruz Hightower 29er
    2016 Chromag Surface 27.5+
    2013 Transition TransAM 29er
    2017 Motobecane Lurch FS 26 fat

  58. #58
    beater
    Reputation: evasive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,155
    Quote Originally Posted by 92gli View Post
    A couple years ago I drove from Philly to Vermont with a buddy to buy a bunch of heady topper. The same winter I wasted a whole pto day driving around my area to find hopslam. I'm DONE going out of my way for beer. If something good is in front of me, I might buy it.

    The "scene" and the jobless people who sit in lawn chairs at beer releases so they can re-sell for profit is played out. My area has multiple brewers canning endless variations of the same goddamn unfiltered IPAs. One of them is even so clever there's no text on their labels, just edgy graphics like a photo of a bearded guy in front of trees. You have to learn to associate the "art" with their even more clever names like "nothing" and "pneumatic spray". But there's no shortage of morons lining up to pay $20 a 4 pack right now. Lol
    This. Iím glad craft brewing has developed to the point that itís not hard to find something good nearly everywhere. I prefer to drink local product, so unless Iím traveling Iím completely uninterested in whatever great beers there are to be found elsewhere.

    Unless Iím in Moab. Then I bring my own.

  59. #59
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    130
    Quote Originally Posted by jackbombay View Post
    I quit drinking micro brew a long time ago, them being overpriced was part of that.

    You've got to hand it to them though, they've done a great job of making beer drinking some sort of competition where the person with the most discerning tasting skills "wins".
    There's nothing wrong with enjoying the fruits of someone's labors. I often pay for things i can't make myself.

    You should quit mountain biking too. MSRP / Miles ridden = more than you're paying for a beer.

  60. #60
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mrmattjohnson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    873
    Quote Originally Posted by bingemtbr View Post
    This is exactly why I no longer enjoy "going out". A 6 pack of Stone Enjoy By is $16 (very good price for a very good beer IMO). A 10oz of Stone Enjoy By at the local publik house is $4.5 (good price as well). But add two more beers and a sandwich...and you're at $30.

    We try not to eat out more than once a week--this includes lunches. When we go out together (i.e. date night) we have stopped ordering alcohol. Especially when you taking your 24 and 21 yr old sons to dinner, drinking can kill your budget.

    Also, the same case can be made for food. $12 for a burger? $25 for a steak? You can buy an awful good lump of meat at Costco/SAMs/local IGA for $25-50. And since you're at home, no DUI's.

    Yes, I am joining the ranks of crotchety and cranky old dudes.
    i am the same way, i would rather drink a couple of beers at home for the same price as 1 beer at a bar. However, the only place i enjoying buying a pint from is the brewery that made it. The best conversations can be had doing so plus it helps the brewery out since it goes right back into their pockets instead of the margin between distributor/bar.

  61. #61
    mtbr member
    Reputation: demonlarry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    184
    15 pack of All Day IPA, ~$17.00 lasts a few days, deliciousness. I havenít been to a bar that sells ďmicrosĒ in a while. Last Friday we went to a very [hyper] local bar, we, the three of us drank all night for $40.00 plus tip.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  62. #62
    CEO Product Failure
    Reputation: bingemtbr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    815
    I agree with the OP; craft beers can be pricey. A few years back (2009? not sure) I bought my first 6 pack of Bell's Hopslam for about $9. In recent years, if you're lucky you can get a 6 pack of Hopslam for $15 (Krogers, Dierbergs, or other grocers) and its upto to $22 per 6 pack at the liquor store (Binny's, Friar Tucks, Randalls, etc.).

    At the Iceman, I asked a rep from Bell's what was driving the cost up. The Bells rep responded that Bells has not changed prices in the past decade. The retail prices are controlled by distribution. Well if this is true, then it explains why certain liquor stores still had Hopslam on the shelves in August (insert vomit emoji here).

    This pricing "strategy" is not unique to Bells. Same thing happened with Ballast Point's Sculpin a few years back.

    At the end of the day, it is what it is.

  63. #63
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    2
    PBR is always a good cheap at home beer.

  64. #64
    _CJ
    _CJ is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    941
    $6 pints (not actually a pint, closer to 12oz the way they're poured) is the norm where I live, "the napa valley of beer", and $8+ is getting to be pretty common.

    Personally, I'm over it. Not paying those prices in a brewery or restaurant, and have cut wayyy back on how much of it I buy in the store. To a large extent, I've been sticking with German beer, and other imports over the past year. Generally, if they've been brewing it since the 1800's or earlier, it's pretty damn good.

    But that's just me. There seems to be no shortage of "poor underpaid millennials drowning in student debt, and unable to afford decent housing" standing in line for $8 beers, and $15 burgers, so I have no issue with a business owner setting prices as high as the market will bear.

    .
    Last edited by _CJ; 3 Weeks Ago at 08:29 AM.

  65. #65
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Schulze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    631
    My strategy:

    Go to Whole Foods and buy a 6 pack of craft for $1.25/12oz. Drink ONE beer at the bar. Cruise on over to my house and park it. Take 5 remaining beers to a buddy's house around the corner and enjoy the rest of the evening. Walk home. Very safe and inexpensive. Self driving cars will solve this.

  66. #66
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    43
    Sorry haven't read the whole thread yet, but a quick comment. I honestly don't mind paying a bit more at the breweries or tap houses. If I wanted a cheap drink, I'd buy a cheap bottle of wine or volume based purchase at a big box of BMC.

    There is a reason it is called "craft" beer from Nano/Micro-breweries. These places don't have the volume of scale that Bud has, so it will be more costly for them to produce. In addition, the actual "craft" part of the equation. Some of the more expensive beers literally take more than a year to make BBA Stouts / Sours in particular. Would you go to a local artisan wood worker who hand crafts wood tables and sells them for a few hundred bucks and say, "But I can buy a wood table from IKEA for $20!!!"? Of course not.

    The above doesn't even take into the account the "experience" element. My wife & I go out to breweries and tap houses to socialize, talk shit, get away from our house for a bit. That is in essence entertainment and there is value in that. Not too mention the financial side of the equation for supporting a small local business and the local people they employ.

    Long story short, craft beer is worth it in every sense, and directly giving the breweries your business is the best way to eliminate as much of the middle man as possible. I do not own/have financial stakes in a brewery FYI in case you are wondering.

    As for the DUI, that is what UBER or a designated driver is for.
    Last edited by roughster; 1 Week Ago at 04:06 PM.

  67. #67
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    641
    The more you buy and drink the cheaper it will cost to make because they will be able to make more of it at a time. Maybe you guys just aren't buying enough tasty yummy beer. You should be drinking a six pack a day to get the maximum health benefits of it and two a day on the weekends and holidays.

  68. #68
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    4,337
    Quote Originally Posted by roughster View Post
    Sorry haven't read the whole thread yet, but a quick comment. I honestly don't mind paying a bit more at the breweries or tap houses. If I wanted a cheap drink, I'd be a cheap bottle of wine or volume based purchase at a big box of BMC.

    There is a reason it is called "craft" beer from Nano/Micro-breweries. These places don't have the volume of scale that Bud has, so it will be more costly for them to produce. In addition, the actual "craft" part of the equation. Some of the more expensive beers literally take more than a year to make BBA Stouts / Sours in particular. Would you go to a local artisan wood worker who hand crafts wood tables and sells them for a few hundred bucks and say, "But I can buy a wood table from IKEA for $20!!!"? Of course not.

    The above doesn't even take into the account the "experience" element. My wife go out to breweries and tap houses to socialize, talk shit, get away from our house for a bit. That is in essence entertainment and there is value in that. Not too mention the financial side of the equation for supporting a small local business and the local people they employ.

    Long story short, craft beer is worth it in every sense, and directly giving the breweries your business is the best way to eliminate as much of the middle man as possible. I do not own/have financial stakes in a brewery FYI in case you are wondering.

    As for the DUI, that is what UBER or a designated driver is for.
    Keep believing that. Trillium is $ 22 a 4 pack, I can get better( non oj milkshake) beers for $ 10 -14 for the same 16 oz cans. YRMV. Jacks Abby has GREAT lagers for $ 10 a 6er of tall boy cans. One of my better local options. You can support your local breweries and not get raked over the coals.

  69. #69
    _CJ
    _CJ is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    941
    Quote Originally Posted by roughster View Post
    There is a reason it is called "craft" beer from Nano/Micro-breweries. These places don't have the volume of scale that Bud has, so it will be more costly for them to produce.
    Average production cost for a pint of beer at a micro-brewery is about $.35/pint. Average cost at a bar serving somebody else's "craft" beer will top out at about $1/pint (excluding rare/specialty beers). Think about that next time you're forking over $6-$8-$12 for a glass of beer.

    As for the quality.....that's debatable, especially among nano-brewers. There are certainly people in the industry who are masters of their trade, but they are a rarity, and oddly enough, the ones I know of aren't even close to being the most expensive.

    That said....if you feel you're not paying too much for what you're getting, more power to you, and to the people you're paying to provide the "experience".


    .

  70. #70
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    43
    And how much is rent and power for a Tap house space? How much is insurance and payroll for staff? What about costs to maintain inventory and selection of a decent amount of styles so itís not just 3 IPAs on tap?

    I donít begrudge a small buisiness owner trying to make it and bring good beer to my town. Their profit margin is MUCH smaller than you clearly think it is.

  71. #71
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    641
    I like to buy my beer from the homeless guy under the bridge said no one ever. I like drinking beer at a classy establishment surrounded by affluent people. I like drinking beer that is of a good consistent quality and provides me with the same good taste every time. All of these things cost money.

  72. #72
    _CJ
    _CJ is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    941
    Quote Originally Posted by party_wagon View Post
    I like to buy my beer from the homeless guy under the bridge
    You might be surprised to learn that a lot of brewers aren't too far removed from that guy under the bridge. But hey, as long as it's expensive and served in a fancy glass/establishment, it must be the best, right?


    .

  73. #73
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by party_wagon View Post
    I like to buy my beer from the homeless guy under the bridge said no one ever. I like drinking beer at a classy establishment surrounded by affluent people.
    Not sure what you're getting at here...who buys beer from a guy under a bridge...did I miss something?
    I like to brew beer and drink it, or buy beer and drink it at home where I can hear myself converse with my friends, not at an overpriced brewpub surrounded by loud music, distracting screens, and *possibly* pretentious people who think you need to spend a fortune to have a good time and can't learn to do it themselves. Wasted money if you ask me.

  74. #74
    Ambassador of Chub
    Reputation: Smithhammer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    2,827
    Quote Originally Posted by party_wagon View Post
    The more you buy and drink the cheaper it will cost to make because they will be able to make more of it at a time. Maybe you guys just aren't buying enough tasty yummy beer.
    My entire life experience flies in the face of this theory.


    Quote Originally Posted by party_wagon View Post
    ....I like drinking beer at a classy establishment surrounded by affluent people.
    Thanks for chiming in, Thurston Howell III.
    Last edited by Smithhammer; 1 Week Ago at 09:34 AM.
    "The only way we can truly control the outcome of a ride is not going on it, which is a choice I'm unwilling to make." -K.B.

  75. #75
    Will crash for rim brakes
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    402
    If you guys don't mind canned beer (and yes I know it tastes different), there are some pretty good beers out there for roughly $1 per 12 ounces or $6/six pack of 12 ounces, $8/six pack of 16 ounces. I don't know if you have a BevMo in your area but they have a pretty good selection. Some of the bitter Pilseners actually taste better in cans because the can mellows out the hops. For the German beers Radeberger and Koenig Pilsener I actually prefer them in cans because of this (yes, blasphemy). You can also get the very, very good beer Bitburger in cans, all of these are 16 ounces for around $8/six pack, a very good deal for the quality of beer. If you can find Coronado Seacoast Pilsener that's one of the best American beers, unfortunately it's in a can now instead of a bottle, but the price is cheaper. Last but not least Foster's in the 25.4 oz oil can is usually on sale two for $4, or $1 per 12.7 ounces. I do wish they still had Foster's 12 oz bottles but I have not seen them in the USA for years.
    "If my songs become my freedom, and my freedom turns to gold, then I'll ask the final question, if the answer could be sold"

  76. #76
    Beer Please! SuperModerator
    Reputation: Klurejr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    5,500
    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    Some of the bitter Pilseners actually taste better in cans because the can mellows out the hops.
    There is so much wrong with this sentence.

    First, Cans do NOT mellow out hops.

    Canned beer has the following benefits:
    • Stay Fresher longer due to zero light pollution VS bottles, especially lighter colored glass bottles.
    • Canned beer is less resource intensive to produce.
    • Aluminum is lighter than Glass, so it is cheaper to transport
    • Can's are much better for backpacking or bike-packing because once you drink them they can be crushed down, thus take up less space in ones pack and are much lighter when empty vs bottles.
    • This last one is more my opinion, but I think Cans allow for better artwork as well.
    Ride Bikes, Drink Craft Beer, Repeat.

    Know these before you post:
    MTBR Forum Posting Rules
    e-bike sub-forum rules

  77. #77
    Will crash for rim brakes
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    402
    Quote Originally Posted by Klurejr View Post
    There is so much wrong with this sentence.

    First, Cans do NOT mellow out hops.

    Canned beer has the following benefits:
    • Stay Fresher longer due to zero light pollution VS bottles, especially lighter colored glass bottles.
    • Canned beer is less resource intensive to produce.
    • Aluminum is lighter than Glass, so it is cheaper to transport
    • Can's are much better for backpacking or bike-packing because once you drink them they can be crushed down, thus take up less space in ones pack and are much lighter when empty vs bottles.
    • This last one is more my opinion, but I think Cans allow for better artwork as well.
    OK then why does the same exact beer taste more bitter in a glass than in a can??? It's not just one beer, it's several of them. There doesn't always need to be a scientific explanation, sometimes things just taste different. I think you misinterpreted the statement that a manufacturer will can beer BECAUSE it mellows out the hops. The canning is just a coincidence for this effect, it's not like they planned it that way. I'm not out to promote canned beer, most of it is crap. I'm just saying that my personal experience with true Pilseners (not your craft beers) is that canning blunts the bitter hop taste. That's all.
    "If my songs become my freedom, and my freedom turns to gold, then I'll ask the final question, if the answer could be sold"

  78. #78
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    4,337
    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    OK then why does the same exact beer taste more bitter in a glass than in a can??? It's not just one beer, it's several of them. There doesn't always need to be a scientific explanation, sometimes things just taste different. I think you misinterpreted the statement that a manufacturer will can beer BECAUSE it mellows out the hops. The canning is just a coincidence for this effect, it's not like they planned it that way. I'm not out to promote canned beer, most of it is crap. I'm just saying that my personal experience with true Pilseners (not your craft beers) is that canning blunts the bitter hop taste. That's all.
    The ENTIRE craft beer segment now cans 85% + or so of the product. Some of the bigger ones still bottle and then there are the 22 oz and 750 mls. What chu been smoking? All hoppy beers will have the hop notes drop off after time. Bottle or cans. Dude. Have someone do a blind tasting for of cans vs bottles.

  79. #79
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    46
    Whoa, easy, thread is getting derailed big time. Beer tastes different in cans vs. bottles? Sure, but by how much is arguable depending on what food you last ate and the alkalinity of both your saliva and general state of your stomach, time of day, etc. (Same reason coffee and sugary things taste better in the morning.)
    I personally notice little difference, but agree that the tallboys are good value, and pretty tasty (personal fan of Holsten Festbock or Maibock, always forget which I like better).
    Much more important is how long the beer has been in the can or bottle. From homebrewing experience, beer changes its taste in a big way during the first month after bottling, even if said bottles are purged of oxygen.
    Regardless, yeah, buying beer costs a fraction of what it costs to go out, so tailgating is numero uno, even if it's crappy yellow beer. (Just please no Molson Canadian or Fosters)
    Oh yeah and beer in a glass, warmer than you might think, is better in most instances.
    Last edited by woofer2609; 1 Week Ago at 01:50 PM.

  80. #80
    Beer Please! SuperModerator
    Reputation: Klurejr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    5,500
    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    OK then why does the same exact beer taste more bitter in a glass than in a can???
    Thank you for clarifying what you meant. That is actually an easy one. Drinking from a can(or a bottle) is not the recommended method because of drinking any beer. Using the proper glassware can actually have a big impact on the taste along with the proper temperature.

    There are 2 things you can be experiencing:

    1. Drinking from a glass lets much more of the hop aroma into your nose and smell is a big part of taste. Drinking directly from the can will take the same exact beer and "mellow" the hop aroma's because you cannot actually smell them.
    2. Drinking from a glass also means the beer is going to be warmer, thus allowing the molecules to move faster which in turn creates more aroma and flavors. I am just guessing here, but when you drink from the can, are you pulling it right out of a cold fridge or ice chest? When beer is that cold it loses much of it's flavor because the molecules are moving much slower.


    If you prefer it cold and directly from a can, I am not going to tell you no, everyone is free to enjoy a beverage in whatever way suites them.

    The Scots have a similar saying about Scotch Whiskey, they will NEVER serve it with ice cubes in the Distilleries (I visited about 20 distilleries on a trip there 10 years ago), but rather it is always served at room temperature and the option of adding a few drops of water to further increase the aroma's and slightly cut some of the stronger ones is recommended.

    The same principles apply, the colder the spirit, the less flavor.

    But they will never tell you adding a cube of ice is "wrong". They simply say to enjoy it however you want. (personally I think they do this so as to not offend anyone and continue making money selling Scotch.)
    Ride Bikes, Drink Craft Beer, Repeat.

    Know these before you post:
    MTBR Forum Posting Rules
    e-bike sub-forum rules

  81. #81
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    I started brewing my own beer a few years ago. I bought cheap, basic stuff to get going. You can buy a pre-built kit on Amazon for $110 and that includes a batch of beer. I have basically what the kit has, but the one thing I added was a wort cooler for $40.

    The local homebrew store sells pre-made beer recipe kits for $40-50, or you can put together your own for about $35. A 5 gallon batch makes about 52 12 oz. bottles.

    Bottles were easy - I saved some from store buys, and a friend gave me a bunch. I actually started buying a french fizzy water for awhile that came in 750ml wire bail topped bottles. Makes bottling a little easier, and they reseal.

    I'm dead serious, it is fun, easy, and every single one of the twenty or so batches I've made have turned out great, just as good as any bottled microbrew. I made a lager that just killed. I give a lot of it away, and everyone seems to love it. Or they are just kind?

    It helps that my wife loves to make the beer, but she doesn't drink any of it! I still buy beer occasionally when I run out of homebrew, but I'll reach for a homebrew every time if they are in the fridge.
    I make beer as well.

    I have a few comments.

    The first is make yourself some beer. Once you do, you'll appreciate being able to buy it. It's a lot of work and it doesn't always turn out exactly the way you want. All the beer I've made was good, some excellent, but not always exactly as expected.

    The second is that if you really like beer, get yourself a kegerator. Homebrew or locally-bought kegs are nice things to have around.

    The third is that beer drinking is supposed to be fun. If you're complaining about a few bucks, you're not enjoying yourself. Either have a beer somewhere else or go home. If it's not fun, it's not worth it.

  82. #82
    Will crash for rim brakes
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    402
    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    The ENTIRE craft beer segment now cans 85% + or so of the product. Some of the bigger ones still bottle and then there are the 22 oz and 750 mls. What chu been smoking? All hoppy beers will have the hop notes drop off after time. Bottle or cans. Dude. Have someone do a blind tasting for of cans vs bottles.
    That assumes:

    1. I have respect for craft beers that do not follow the 1516 Purity rule of water, yeast, barley, hops.

    2. That's great craft beer is bottled. Have fun with it. The crap ones I referred to are Budweiser, Miller, Coors. Maybe 25% of the craft beer I've seen are canned, maybe your experience has been different. I'm not an expert on beer like you guys are. I am saying that for Pilseners that follow the purity law, canned beer poured into a glass is consistently less bitter than the same exact beer straight out of a glass bottle. I don't know why there is this tangent into how great craft beer cans are. It's not craft beer I'm talking about. I just looked at expiration dates for the Pilsener canned and bottled beers I have, they all look like around 1 year from date of manufacture. I highly doubt I'm getting fresh bottles and old cans based on the expiration dates of June-Aug of 2018 (manufactured June-Aug of 2017), so all beers losing hop bitterness over time may not apply to what's happening in this case.

    If you don't mind me using logic 101: if someone first speaks about a specific topic (such as Pilsener beer) and then makes a generalization about that specific topic, the generalization is within that topic. It may or may not be extrapolated to all beers. It's a generalization within a certain subset of product, not for an entire product.
    "If my songs become my freedom, and my freedom turns to gold, then I'll ask the final question, if the answer could be sold"

  83. #83
    Will crash for rim brakes
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    402
    Quote Originally Posted by Klurejr View Post
    Thank you for clarifying what you meant. That is actually an easy one. Drinking from a can(or a bottle) is not the recommended method because of drinking any beer. Using the proper glassware can actually have a big impact on the taste along with the proper temperature.

    There are 2 things you can be experiencing:

    1. Drinking from a glass lets much more of the hop aroma into your nose and smell is a big part of taste. Drinking directly from the can will take the same exact beer and "mellow" the hop aroma's because you cannot actually smell them.
    2. Drinking from a glass also means the beer is going to be warmer, thus allowing the molecules to move faster which in turn creates more aroma and flavors. I am just guessing here, but when you drink from the can, are you pulling it right out of a cold fridge or ice chest? When beer is that cold it loses much of it's flavor because the molecules are moving much slower.


    If you prefer it cold and directly from a can, I am not going to tell you no, everyone is free to enjoy a beverage in whatever way suites them.

    The Scots have a similar saying about Scotch Whiskey, they will NEVER serve it with ice cubes in the Distilleries (I visited about 20 distilleries on a trip there 10 years ago), but rather it is always served at room temperature and the option of adding a few drops of water to further increase the aroma's and slightly cut some of the stronger ones is recommended.

    The same principles apply, the colder the spirit, the less flavor.

    But they will never tell you adding a cube of ice is "wrong". They simply say to enjoy it however you want. (personally I think they do this so as to not offend anyone and continue making money selling Scotch.)
    I'll try pouring a glass bottle into an open glass and see if it does the same thing. I don't like drinking straight out of cans, that's best left back in college.


    BTW just to get everyone on the same page, I hope we all agree that:

    If the same brand of beer, same age/brewing batch, is taken from two different 12-16 oz containers, and poured into two identical beer drinking glasses, the taste of the beer will usually be different if the original two containers were an aluminum can and a glass bottle. You must agree with that, right?
    Last edited by richj8990; 1 Week Ago at 03:11 PM.
    "If my songs become my freedom, and my freedom turns to gold, then I'll ask the final question, if the answer could be sold"

  84. #84
    Beer Please! SuperModerator
    Reputation: Klurejr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    5,500
    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    If the same brand of beer, same age/brewing batch, is taken from two different 12-16 oz containers, and poured into two identical beer drinking glasses, the taste of the beer will usually be different if the original two containers were an aluminum can and a glass bottle. You must agree with that, right?
    not at all. they will and should taste exactly the same unless the one was exposed to heat long enough to warm up the container (like above 80 degrees) or if the glass was exposed to light for a long time.

    If both were stored in the same dark cool place then they should taste exactly the same.
    Ride Bikes, Drink Craft Beer, Repeat.

    Know these before you post:
    MTBR Forum Posting Rules
    e-bike sub-forum rules

  85. #85
    beater
    Reputation: evasive's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,155
    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    That assumes:

    1. I have respect for craft beers that do not follow the 1516 Purity rule of water, yeast, barley, hops.

    2. That's great craft beer is bottled. Have fun with it. The crap ones I referred to are Budweiser, Miller, Coors. Maybe 25% of the craft beer I've seen are canned, maybe your experience has been different. I'm not an expert on beer like you guys are. I am saying that for Pilseners that follow the purity law, canned beer poured into a glass is consistently less bitter than the same exact beer straight out of a glass bottle. I don't know why there is this tangent into how great craft beer cans are. It's not craft beer I'm talking about. I just looked at expiration dates for the Pilsener canned and bottled beers I have, they all look like around 1 year from date of manufacture. I highly doubt I'm getting fresh bottles and old cans based on the expiration dates of June-Aug of 2018 (manufactured June-Aug of 2017), so all beers losing hop bitterness over time may not apply to what's happening in this case.

    If you don't mind me using logic 101: if someone first speaks about a specific topic (such as Pilsener beer) and then makes a generalization about that specific topic, the generalization is within that topic. It may or may not be extrapolated to all beers. It's a generalization within a certain subset of product, not for an entire product.
    His post doesnít assume anything, Mr. Logic Professor.

    1. I laughed
    2. Did you forget that you were listing the assumptions you saw in his post?

    You didnít first write about Pilsners. You wrote about the differences between canned and bottled beer and used your experience with Pilsners as an example. You didnít limit your statement about most canned beer being crap to a specific topic or variety. If you think you did, youíre operating under assumptions that nobody else shared. If you had limited it, you wouldnít have gotten so many replies addressing your statements about canning.

  86. #86
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by Klurejr View Post
    not at all. they will and should taste exactly the same unless the one was exposed to heat long enough to warm up the container (like above 80 degrees) or if the glass was exposed to light for a long time.

    If both were stored in the same dark cool place then they should taste exactly the same.
    The canned one might actually be fresher since no light reaches the beer with canning.

  87. #87
    Moderator Moderator
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    5,970
    My beer is gone usually empty too quickly to notice such niggling esoteric distinctions.

    Ooops...there goes another one!
    Sinister Bikes
    Wraith Bicycles
    Sunday River Mtn Bike Park
    NEMBA
    Wachusett Brewing Co.

  88. #88
    Will crash for rim brakes
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    402
    Quote Originally Posted by Klurejr View Post
    not at all. they will and should taste exactly the same unless the one was exposed to heat long enough to warm up the container (like above 80 degrees) or if the glass was exposed to light for a long time.

    If both were stored in the same dark cool place then they should taste exactly the same.
    You really think canned beer doesn't taste metallic? Ok lets just agree on something, that Coors light sucks.

  89. #89
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    23

    Ok, beer prices are getting stupid

    Cans are coated with a plastic on the inside, so the beer (or pop/soda, etc.) is not in contact with anything metallic...


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  90. #90
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RFrahm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    5
    Pour your canned beer into a glass, problem solved. Itís the smell of the aluminum up to your nose that alters perception of taste. Several craft brewers are using cans because they recycle and get back into use much faster and easier than glass. The fact that I now have more easy to carry delicious post ride or summit brews is just a bonus to me!

    But what do I know, I love IPAís on cask in a taproom, but still enjoy plenty of $9.99 18 packs of Rolling Rock. Right from the can.

  91. #91
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    985
    I don't go out to drink, I go out to dance.
    I'll buy a couple of overpriced beers in support of the club's business model (having seen too many clubs drop their psytrance nights because we didn't drink enough!)
    Sometimes "Happy Hour" pricing can be a bargain.
    After hours clubs are best, the music and dancing continue for some hours after the bars stop serving. Gives those inside time to sober up, and we don't have to dodge drunk drivers on the way home.

    Sent from my SM-P900 using Tapatalk

  92. #92
    Beer Please! SuperModerator
    Reputation: Klurejr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    5,500
    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    You really think canned beer doesn't taste metallic? Ok lets just agree on something, that Coors light sucks.
    No, I do not think beer from a can tastes metallic. Please note these 2 replies that address your concern:

    Quote Originally Posted by Sparkman999 View Post
    Cans are coated with a plastic on the inside, so the beer (or pop/soda, etc.) is not in contact with anything metallic...
    Quote Originally Posted by RFrahm View Post
    Pour your canned beer into a glass, problem solved. Itís the smell of the aluminum up to your nose that alters perception of taste. Several craft brewers are using cans because they recycle and get back into use much faster and easier than glass.
    Ride Bikes, Drink Craft Beer, Repeat.

    Know these before you post:
    MTBR Forum Posting Rules
    e-bike sub-forum rules

  93. #93
    _CJ
    _CJ is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    941
    Upon further consideration, it's not beer prices that are getting stupid, it was my level of consumption. Drink less, spend less.


    .

  94. #94
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RFrahm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    5
    I had that talk with a friend today actually! We decided consumption wasnít a factor, our need was not optional. So we continue our search for delicious cheap beer!

Similar Threads

  1. Stupid Stupid hiker
    By velo99 in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 56
    Last Post: 09-05-2014, 10:53 AM
  2. Stupid is as stupid does .....videos.
    By DIRTJUNKIE in forum Off Camber (off topic)
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-11-2014, 04:32 AM
  3. Stupid questions about stupid expensive bike
    By D_K in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-10-2013, 08:19 PM
  4. Stupid is as stupid does!
    By SummitSurfer in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 11-17-2012, 10:14 PM
  5. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-22-2012, 10:57 AM

Members who have read this thread: 268

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •