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  1. #1
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    Least Hops (Blasphemy, I know)

    I think as I age I am getting some mild allergies. This is becoming more and more noticeable when I drink super hoppy beer.

    I LOVE super hoppy beer. Stone IPA, Eddyline Crank Yanker...you name a hoppy one and I probably love it.

    But I'm noticing I have sinus problems all the following day. The other night I had a few Negro Modelos and didn't have any issues. Got me wondering if I should shoot for less hoppy alternatives for a while.

    Anyone else have this issue? Did changing beers help? If so, what did you turn to?

    Thanks,
    Ted
    in the ghetto of Evergreen

  2. #2
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    Hops allergy? You must have done something karmically monstrous to have earned yourself that.

    But there are worse ways to spend life than drinking Russian imperial stouts, saisons, and sours.

  3. #3
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    I hope I can turn that Karma around!

    Just picked up a few sours to try. Damn! They ain't cheap.
    in the ghetto of Evergreen

  4. #4
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    Porters, stouts, octoberfest styles have less hops. Seek professional help. Like an MD.

  5. #5
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    I think you should do more thorough investigation to be sure...

    But almost anything other than a US-IPA should be good for ya, not sure where in the US you'd be able to find one but have a go at some cask-conditioned English bitters if you get a chance, the very opposite of hoppy!

  6. #6
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    When relocating to the East coast, I too had this evil reaction, and noticed it first from hoppy micro brews.
    Went to an allergist who ID-ed a slew of allergens.
    Now stick to Porters, Stouts, and Brown Ales, and life is good.
    The best is the one you want to ride most often..

  7. #7
    jrm
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    Same here, but ill get a sore throat and stuffed up nose. I dont think its hops in general but particular types of hops.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrm View Post
    Same here, but ill get a sore throat and stuffed up nose. I dont think its hops in general but particular types of hops.
    I have mild hop allergies and it is definitely certain hops varietals. I haven't nailed it down yet and continue to drink hoppy beers, some affect me more than others.

  9. #9
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    I still don't get the hop thing. I see people who order those super bitter hoppy beers with trendy names ("I'll have a Skull Crusher Double Hop Face Suck IPA!") take a sip and it's so bitter they wince and say, with a strained voice "Oh..that's *cough* good." They then fight to drink the whole thing and order something else next." Good. Uh huh. Nice try.

    Restaurants with a beer menu two pages long full of 50 varieties of the same bitter IPAs are laughable. I don't even look at the menu. I just say "Bring me the beer that's as un-hoppy as you can." The waitress doesn't know what to do.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinGT View Post
    I still don't get the hop thing. I see people who order those super bitter hoppy beers with trendy names ("I'll have a Skull Crusher Double Hop Face Suck IPA!") take a sip and it's so bitter they wince and say, with a strained voice "Oh..that's *cough* good." They then fight to drink the whole thing and order something else next." Good. Uh huh. Nice try.

    Restaurants with a beer menu two pages long full of 50 varieties of the same bitter IPAs are laughable. I don't even look at the menu. I just say "Bring me the beer that's as un-hoppy as you can." The waitress doesn't know what to do.
    Fine, but you're only cheating yourself if you assume that your beer tastes are static. (Assuming no hops allergy, I mean.) Beers I would have considered undrinkable 3 years ago are a religious experience for me today. That's common.
    Last edited by OldManBike; 12-11-2014 at 12:31 PM.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinGT View Post
    I still don't get the hop thing. I see people who order those super bitter hoppy beers with trendy names ("I'll have a Skull Crusher Double Hop Face Suck IPA!") take a sip and it's so bitter they wince and say, with a strained voice "Oh..that's *cough* good." They then fight to drink the whole thing and order something else next." Good. Uh huh. Nice try.

    Restaurants with a beer menu two pages long full of 50 varieties of the same bitter IPAs are laughable. I don't even look at the menu. I just say "Bring me the beer that's as un-hoppy as you can." The waitress doesn't know what to do.
    Not all IPA's are bitter.

    If you look at the brewing process the bitterness from the oils is a requirement to balance the sweetness of the Extracted Malt Sugars. With no Hops beer would be undrinkable sugar-water.

    Some Hop Varietals impart only bitter flavors, and are typically known as Bittering Hops, These hops are added near the beginning of the boil process. The more aromatic and flavorful hops are added near the end of the boil, and to get the big aromas brewers "Dry Hop" the beer after fermentation is done. The process is basically cold brewing ice tea. This imparts very little bitter qualities but gives big amounts of Aroma.

    If you know someone who home brews I encourage you to spend time with them during a brew day to learn more about the process. I know home brewing for me has really helped my appreciation for all the different things you can do to get different flavors and aromas from the final product.

    Please do not think that just because something is styled as an IPA, Single - double - triple or otherwise, that it is bitter. I recently brewed a Double IPA (came in right about 8%) and used Mozaic for end of Boil Hop Additions and Dry hoping. My recipe was very simple, 90% Marris Otter Base Malt and 10% Vienna Base Malt. Marris Otter is know for its super malty character compared to say two-row base. The end result is a very aromatic beer with great earthy/piney flavors up from and a clean malty finish. We used a large amount of hops for this batch, but there is Zero Bitterness. If you live anywhere near San Diego I would gladly invite you over to sample it.
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  12. #12
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    what were your IBUs? 60s to balance off the ABV for the style?

    Quote Originally Posted by Klurejr View Post
    Not all IPA's are bitter.

    If you look at the brewing process the bitterness from the oils is a requirement to balance the sweetness of the Extracted Malt Sugars. With no Hops beer would be undrinkable sugar-water.

    Some Hop Varietals impart only bitter flavors, and are typically known as Bittering Hops, These hops are added near the beginning of the boil process. The more aromatic and flavorful hops are added near the end of the boil, and to get the big aromas brewers "Dry Hop" the beer after fermentation is done. The process is basically cold brewing ice tea. This imparts very little bitter qualities but gives big amounts of Aroma.

    If you know someone who home brews I encourage you to spend time with them during a brew day to learn more about the process. I know home brewing for me has really helped my appreciation for all the different things you can do to get different flavors and aromas from the final product.

    Please do not think that just because something is styled as an IPA, Single - double - triple or otherwise, that it is bitter. I recently brewed a Double IPA (came in right about 8%) and used Mozaic for end of Boil Hop Additions and Dry hoping. My recipe was very simple, 90% Marris Otter Base Malt and 10% Vienna Base Malt. Marris Otter is know for its super malty character compared to say two-row base. The end result is a very aromatic beer with great earthy/piney flavors up from and a clean malty finish. We used a large amount of hops for this batch, but there is Zero Bitterness. If you live anywhere near San Diego I would gladly invite you over to sample it.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrmattjohnson View Post
    what were your IBUs? 60s to balance off the ABV for the style?
    I do not have a way to gauge my IBU's at the moment. But if I had to guess I would say well below 100.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldManBike View Post
    Fine, but you're only cheating yourself if you assume that your beer tastes are static. (Assuming no hops allergy, I mean.) Beers I would have considered undrinkable 3 years ago are a religious experience for me today. That's common.
    Amen to that! I recently re-tried one of the first big west-coast-style IPAs that knocked my socks off and got me interested in IPAs, and it was pretty damn tame by comparison to what I'm used to drinking (and brewing) now.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klurejr View Post
    I do not have a way to gauge my IBU's at the moment. But if I had to guess I would say well below 100.
    better considering taste buds can only taste to 100, after that its all wasted and marketing

  16. #16
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    do you use any recipe calculator? that can get you probably within 10 ibu's if your scale is accurate

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinGT View Post
    I still don't get the hop thing. I see people who order those super bitter hoppy beers with trendy names ("I'll have a Skull Crusher Double Hop Face Suck IPA!") take a sip and it's so bitter they wince and say, with a strained voice "Oh..that's *cough* good." They then fight to drink the whole thing and order something else next." Good. Uh huh. Nice try.

    Restaurants with a beer menu two pages long full of 50 varieties of the same bitter IPAs are laughable. I don't even look at the menu. I just say "Bring me the beer that's as un-hoppy as you can." The waitress doesn't know what to do.
    No entiendo
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrmattjohnson View Post
    do you use any recipe calculator? that can get you probably within 10 ibu's if your scale is accurate
    I am the creative side of the home brew operation, my buddy does all the science stuff.. lol. I will have to ask him.
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  19. #19
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    I think it might the grain I have a friend who some beers cause this the hops are not the problem

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klurejr View Post
    I do not have a way to gauge my IBU's at the moment. But if I had to guess I would say well below 100.
    I find the IBU scale to be misleading with modern brewing techniques. For example whirlpooling/hop steeping will give you HUGE hop flavor but doesn't fit in anywhere in a program like Beersmith.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Samuryan View Post
    I find the IBU scale to be misleading with modern brewing techniques. For example whirlpooling/hop steeping will give you HUGE hop flavor but doesn't fit in anywhere in a program like Beersmith.
    whirlpool gives you minimal ibu's anyway.

  22. #22
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    Not so sure about that, I get 23IBU from the 10 minute whirlpool of my flame out addition on my most recent IPA recipe according to beersmith, and that is using fairly low alpha hops (Amarillo 8.4$, Cascade 6.9% and Riwaka 6.0%). If I had Simcoe/Columbis/Citra in there at 12-15+ AA the IBU from a 10-15 minute whirlpool would be considerable. Total IBU for the recipe is 70, so the difference that 23 makes is quite noticeable.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by David R View Post
    Not so sure about that, I get 23IBU from the 10 minute whirlpool of my flame out addition on my most recent IPA recipe according to beersmith, and that is using fairly low alpha hops (Amarillo 8.4$, Cascade 6.9% and Riwaka 6.0%). If I had Simcoe/Columbis/Citra in there at 12-15+ AA the IBU from a 10-15 minute whirlpool would be considerable. Total IBU for the recipe is 70, so the difference that 23 makes is quite noticeable.
    whirlpool is at knock out so you get minimal IBUs unless you pour a crap load of hops in.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrmattjohnson View Post
    whirlpool is at knock out so you get minimal IBUs unless you pour a crap load of hops in.
    yeah lots of hops as a flameout addition . . .definitely changes bitterness, affects flavor and aroma, doesn't seem to calculate properly for me in Beersmith. I am getting to where i want to be through trial and error.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrmattjohnson View Post
    whirlpool is at knock out so you get minimal IBUs unless you pour a crap load of hops in.
    And if we're talking about IPAs and IBUs then there should be a massive flame our addition...

    IMO, the bitterness you get from the whirlpool/hop-stand after a big flame out addition is more like FWH, in that it comes from a long gentle steep rather than prolonged aggressive boiling, so the bitterness isn't as harsh as you would get from the same IBU from a big 60-90min addition. In fact my last IIPA that had over 25 IBU extra from the hop-stand wasn't bitter enough according to the judges. So trial-and-error is definitely needed, you can't ignore the IBU from a big FO addition, but I'm not sure I'd take them at the same "value" as the IBUs from the bittering addition at 60/90 min.

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