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Thread: IPA popularity

  1. #1
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    IPA popularity

    Why so popular with so many people all of a sudden?

    I am no expert and perhaps they have always been popular? Just seems like so many micros focus on IPA IPA IPA IPA.....

    They taste like they have tree sap brewed into them or something of that nature. Is just the high amount of hops?

    I just went to Stone Brewing's 16th anniversary beer fest and tried a bunch on IPAs, but I guess they just don't agree with my taste buds.

    There was only one huge line at the entire event. It was for Russian River Pliny the Elder.

    Yuck. It was the only beer I didn't finish. Beer foul

    I feel like I am missing out on something, but my taste buds lead me to other types of beer more along the lines of a Guinness...

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    I think it is because it is a good way to get introduced to craft beers (everybody makes them) and they are pretty tasty. IPAs are a little hoppy, just like a 29'r if you don't like it - don't ride it
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    Quote Originally Posted by rydbyk View Post
    Why so popular with so many people all of a sudden?
    Actually, this is a really interesting question. I've got some theories but I'd be curious to hear what others think. I think part of it is the love affair Americans seem to have with hops/hoppy beers which started about 10-15 years ago and just keeps ramping up every year. In the early microbrew days a brewers standard flagship was generally a Pale Ale and I think brewers and drinkers have just kept pushing the hop needle up and up to the point where Pale Ales are almost what a standard Lager was 20 years ago. None of this answers the real question though which is what is it about hoppy beers that people love?

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    I tend to agree. I never understood the obsession with IPAs. A lot of them taste like a bottle of pine tar to me.

    I guess it's probably because the big boys would never produce one (i.e. they're not for the masses), so they're kind of intertwined with microbreweries.

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    A related question: Why do IPAs have such a strong piney flavor. I figured it was all the hops, but I've had a few heavily hopped Pilsners and they have a much smoother flavor without any of that thick, syrupy pine needle taste. Different kind of hops? Brewing process?

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    The "tree sap" taste is the hops. I think it takes a little time to start to appreciate the bitterness and flavors that make an IPA what it is. I have just started really exploring craft beers and can really say that the last couple months, have I been able to understand the draw of a good IPA. Also there are many American style IPA's that are different then English style IPA's. The type of hopes they use also makes a big difference. Some are more citrusy tasting while some are more grassy, and others are piney. If the brewery is big on bittering the beer they add hops early in the boil, but if they want more hop aromas or flavors they add them later in the boil, or dry hop - where they add hops after the boil into the fermentor or even right before botteling.

    It could just be not what you were expecting? Especially comparing to a Guinness, which gets most of it's flavor from the malt profile and water. For a while I was looking for more malty flavors in beers, so extra or American pale ales hit my palate better.

    I haven't tried either beers you mentioned so I can't speak for them, but I really enjoy Surly Furious for an IPA. It seems to have a really good balance.

    This site can help you determine if what you're drinking falls into the style it says it is, as many brewers deviate from it. BJCP 2008 Style Guidelines - Category 14

    Again, it could just not be the flavor you want in a beer, which is perfectly fine. Just like bikes there are many to try and enjoy. And just cause you don't like it today, doesn't mean you wont like it in a different situation. I think it's great that you are willing to try them and not be stuck on only what you know.

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    So much is happening with hop varieties right now it's crazy. If you looked at home brew recipes from 20 years ago, nine times out of ten they would involve the same handful of hop varieties. Nowadays, they are creating new types of hops left and right to accentuate different flavors and this is working hand in hand with the explosion of IPAs. I think also the fact that the current breed of IPA's are uniquely American in style may have something to do with the popularity. For years American beers really just mimicked European styles (mostly English) and now we've actually begun to innovate and change the way even Europeans look at beer.

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    Mmmm, this made me think of the Ninkasi Tricerahops Double IPA that I had this weekend, an IPA I really liked. I'm not a fan of the "piney" IPAs that seem to be gaining popularity. They can be good in small doses but I can have about half a glass of many of those before I just can't appreciate the flavor any longer. Too much aftertaste that doesn't effect my pallet favorably, like a bad sour candy. I have also found that it really depends on what type of food I am eating with an IPA as to whether I like it or not. I tend to like the darker spectrum of beers like a good porter or stout so it could just be my pallet.

    I was on a bit of a Ninkasi kick this weekend due to them being on sale at my local supermarket. They make some great Ales. I also had their Oatmeal Stout, which was great as always, and their summer seasonal called Radiant which was decent though had some of the IPA piney aftertaste. It wasn't so much that it took away from the flavor and stuck with you too long. It was a well balanced Ale that didn't take the IPA hoppiness too far. They don't list it as an IPA though I would personally put it in that category.

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    I think the IPA boom started off as a fad, and has evolved into something much more refined and enjoyable. The fad was one where "bigger is better" for beer - more hops, more alcohol, more crazy flavors. For many beer styles, that hasn't changed, but for IPAs it has morphed into an exercise in different hop varieties as Carl Hungus mentioned.

    Beer makers are beginning to address the industry the same way winemakers have done for many years - by focusing on the building blocks. Water chemistry, grain diversity and hop species are far more complex issues than they were 10-15 years ago. With hop species diversifying and coming from different parts of the globe, brewers have begun to tap into flavors that didn't exist in beer 10 years ago. Yes, the standard IPA has a piney, grapefruit, and resinous character. But what about blueberry, pineapple, orange, grassy, or floral flavors from the hops? These are all flavors yielded by current hop offerings in the myriad of IPAs available on the market today.

    Modern day IPAs are far more than bitter bombs they used to be. Sure, those bitter bombs still exist, but more brewers are refining the beers and looking for balance and expressive character, whether it's dank, floral or even tropical. The fact is, people like hops, and the dimension they add to the beer. Now brewers are focusing on how to get that hop flavor and aroma into beer without turning it into a bitter, astrigent mess.

    Personally, I'm a huge fan.

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    I don't hate IPA's, but I am annoyed that the best beer shop in town carries so many of them, at the exclusion of so many other good beers.

    I have had some hoppy beers that I really like. I have also had a few of those really bitter hop bombs that I didn't like.

    one thing my local beer shop is doing well these days are ciders. one of the guys who works there is celiac, and he's not been impressed with the gluten free sorghum beers on the market, so he's gotten into the ciders a lot. the shop carries some good ones.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jtmartino View Post
    I think the IPA boom started off as a fad, and has evolved into something much more refined and enjoyable. The fad was one where "bigger is better" for beer - more hops, more alcohol, more crazy flavors. For many beer styles, that hasn't changed, but for IPAs it has morphed into an exercise in different hop varieties as Carl Hungus mentioned.

    Beer makers are beginning to address the industry the same way winemakers have done for many years - by focusing on the building blocks. Water chemistry, grain diversity and hop species are far more complex issues than they were 10-15 years ago. With hop species diversifying and coming from different parts of the globe, brewers have begun to tap into flavors that didn't exist in beer 10 years ago. Yes, the standard IPA has a piney, grapefruit, and resinous character. But what about blueberry, pineapple, orange, grassy, or floral flavors from the hops? These are all flavors yielded by current hop offerings in the myriad of IPAs available on the market today.

    Modern day IPAs are far more than bitter bombs they used to be. Sure, those bitter bombs still exist, but more brewers are refining the beers and looking for balance and expressive character, whether it's dank, floral or even tropical. The fact is, people like hops, and the dimension they add to the beer. Now brewers are focusing on how to get that hop flavor and aroma into beer without turning it into a bitter, astrigent mess.

    Personally, I'm a huge fan.
    Well put sir as usual...

    I would add that it seems to be a taste developed over time. The majority (though i have met a few exceptions) of people I know who love IPA's grew into them over time. Most new to craft beer types don't seem to like them straight off, but as their pallet adjusts to larger stronger flavors they tend to go for the bigger bolder beers (including others like 100% brett, rauchbier, Strong ales etc...)
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    Years ago Sam Adams and Dog Fish Head combined advertising. The tag line was something like: hops are beer flavor - no hops, no beer flavor. I blame SA and DFH for the current over-the-hop IPA movement.
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    To clarify: A lot of hops does not equil bitter though. To quote myself in reference to IBU:

    "To get even more technical its measuring the Isomerized Alpha Acids contained within the beer. Isomerization happens during the boil, thus the multiple hop additions at different times. Different hops contain different amount of alpha acids, you will commonly hear "high alpha hops" among brewers, as these are desirable for IPA's. Isomerized alpha acids = bitterness. Probably more info than needed, but i thought it was interesting when i found

    I don't know to much about it in practicality but the EBU (European Bitterness Unit) is supposed to measure "perceived bitterness". Who knows how well this works, and havn't really taken the time to find out a beers EBU vs. IBU. From the little i know about the EBU it seems like a more pracital way to let the consumer know how bitter the beer actually tastes."

    from this prior thread: Best "low IBU" brews

    Hops add many delightful flavors other than bitter. Even the sweetest sugariest fruitiest beers have hops. Beer has to have hops to be considered beer, otherwise its malt liquor.
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    You're doing it wrong.

    Just kidding.

    My beer snobbery started with Guinness and Fat Tire. Now Pliny the Elder is one of my fave's. It's really best enjoyed out of the bottle sometimes, not quite sure why.

    As far as IPA's go... I really disliked them at first. They are sharp and bitter and seem to have no taste. It's sort of like a good red wine... I remember being able to enjoy Chardonnay or Pinot Grigio, but would balk at red's. Develop a palate!

    Try DIPAs. It's counter-intuitive, but they are a bit smoother than a traditional IPA. Technically I think Pliny is considered a DIPA.

    Most of the local stuff is good. But, pick a DIPA and have it with some BBQ or something kind of sharp and spicy.

    Did you try the 16th Anniversary? Anything else at the fest that you did enjoy?

    Also, nothing wrong with preferring stouts and porter's. I LOVE a good dark beer. We had a Peak XV the other night from Black Diamond Brewing. Awesome. The Yeti Brewing Oak Aged stout's are good. From Port Brewing the Old Viscosity. And, almost anything breakfast stout

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    Stone might be one of the kings of over the top IBU beers ( Victory also comes to mind ). I think the IPA trend might be 10years or so now. I like em pretty good, but prefer more balance than boldness...thinking Longtrail from the east or Lagunitas from the west. My favorite IPA isTrout River Brewing up near Kingdom Trails VT. Dan the brewer is not an all bitter-up-front IPA guy which is probably why his stuff is so good. (finished with fresh hops in the holdingtank straight from his garden)

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    If the trend is to continue adding hops and flavor, when will all these hopheads switch over to stouts and porters...


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    Quote Originally Posted by rydbyk View Post
    Why so popular with so many people all of a sudden?
    ...
    I feel like I am missing out on something, but my taste buds lead me to other types of beer more along the lines of a Guinness...
    I'm with you on this one! Occasionally there will be an IPA that I enjoy (usually it involves someone else buying it), but for the most part I stay away from them.

  18. #18
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    Been enjoying IPAs going on 20 years now and pretty much "only" IPAs for the last 15+. Perhaps it's silly, but while I can enjoy other beers (especially a good lager), I long for hoppy ale.

    I enjoy the flavor, but also the aroma. What some brewers are doing with hops is just wonderful.

    Different strokes for different folks though. It'd be a boring world if everyone ate and drank the same thing.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guerdonian View Post
    Beer has to have hops to be considered beer, otherwise its malt liquor.
    Or Gruit, (ale fermented with various other herbs). I've been thinking of experimenting with some flavors for brewing a gruit. gruitale.com :: Gruit Ale & Unhopped Beers, Brewing Herbs and Recipes

    But hops possesses two characteristics notably different than the herbs it replaced - it causes the drinker to become drowsy and it diminishes sexual desire. Protestant literature of the time, denoting the "problems" associated with the gruit herbs, contradict contemporary beer historians and are in actuality some of the first drug control manifestos on record. The laws that eventually passed in the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries restricting the number of herbal additives used in brewing are actually the first drug control laws ever passed.
    Gruit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    The more IPAs my beer store stocks the better, as far as I'm concerned. My two main beer "types" are IPAs and Stouts. That's not to say I like every IPA I try nor every Stout I try.

    A lot of mountain bikers in my area drink IPAs and I just sort of thought that's what most people drink. Wrong! I'll stand in front of the beer section, the guy next to me might be looking perplexed as to what to buy, I'd recommend one of my IPA favorites and (invariably) he'd say, oh I hate IPAs. Then he'd recommend some lame Brown Ale, my idea of the typical sink beer (two sips and I pour it out).

    So I came to the realization that, in fact, a small percentage of folks drink IPAs. I love a good IPA and will choose an IPA on a Brewery Tour every time.

    There's no accounting for taste. What tastes great to me takes like grassy pine tar to the next guy. I envy the beer drinker who says "oh, I'll drink just about anything". I don't drink Pilsners, I don't drink Ales, I don't drink Lagers, Bocks, the list is endless of what I won't drink...it's just a waste of my time. I drink IPAs and Stouts.
    So it seems to me to be, this thing that I think I see.

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    Quote Originally Posted by xcguy View Post
    ...I don't drink Pilsners, I don't drink Ales, I don't drink Lagers, Bocks, the list is endless of what I won't drink...it's just a waste of my time. I drink IPAs and Stouts.
    I don't like Lagers and Pilsners either. Though saying you don't drink Ales is a pretty broad sweep, as IPA is India Pale Ale. But I'm guessing that you are referring to most other ales. Personally I'll try most ales, stouts and porters. And let the individual beer speak for itself.

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    Quote Originally Posted by xcguy View Post
    I don't drink Ales, I don't drink Lagers,
    All beers are either Ales or Lagers, though I understand what you were getting at
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    Quote Originally Posted by xcguy View Post
    There's no accounting for taste. What tastes great to me takes like grassy pine tar to the next guy. I envy the beer drinker who says "oh, I'll drink just about anything". I don't drink Pilsners, I don't drink Ales, I don't drink Lagers, Bocks, the list is endless of what I won't drink...it's just a waste of my time. I drink IPAs and Stouts.
    I feel bad for you. You're missing out on a lot of great beers. Also, as has been pointed out, IPAs and Stouts are both Ales.

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    Fer instance: I used to drink Sierra Nevada Pale Ale. I tried all their seasonals (Celebration, Anniversary etc) till one winter they came out with Torpedo. After drinking Torpedo all SNs "ales" seemed lacking. Thank god it's year round. I've suggested it to guys at the beer cooler and not one has said they like it. They'll walk out with Fat Tire or some Brown Ale. And so it goes.

    Red Ale, Pale Ale, Brown Ale, those are what I'm referring to. I know one can argue nomenclature all day but just drink a Sierra Nevada Torpedo---that's my go to IPA. Then drink their Pale Ale and see if you taste the difference.

    I didn't drink beer for about 15 years after I got sick in Mexico and my body chemistry changed. After eliminating foods and whatnot to try to tone down my symptoms I stopped drinking beer and that's what it was. Sob, but I gave up beer for about 15 years.

    About three years ago I tried beer again and boy have the selections changed. To make a long selection story short my first beer back was a Dogfish Head 90 Minute. A religious experience, fo' sho'.

    To make another longer experimentation story short, I got tired of the 90 Minutes blast of everything IPA and looked for something not so over the top. I've tried almost everyone's IPAs and DIPAs. Like I say, no accounting for taste. Some I like, some I don't. Some I love (like Odell's IPA) but are just a bit too expensive for an every day brew.

    Now, my IPA short list: Torpedo, Avery IPA, Santa Fe Happy Camper and Great Divide Titan.
    So it seems to me to be, this thing that I think I see.

  25. #25
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    IPAs trendy???

    Hmmm...this is all very interesting. IPAs are practically a benchmark for brewers up my way in Seattle (though it's probably more accurate to call them "NW" or "West Coast" style, if you've ever had a classic English IPA); but over the last 5-7 years or so, IPAs have fallen out of favor somewhat amongst many of the cutting-edge brewers. While it may not account for most of their revenues, there is certainly a lot more hype around Belgian and German styles.

    Don't get me wrong -- I love to drink stuff like Boneyard's Hop Venom (so much so, that I designed my driving route down to Tahoe so that I'd hit Bend at 11am when the brewery opens); but I'm drinking a lot of Dick Cantwell's (Elysian) crazy Belgian one-offs *and* super-traditional, clean German lagered styles from Chuckanut in Bellingham these days.

    There's a lot of great beer, and if alpha isn't your thing, just find something else. As long as it's craft.

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    It is a personal taste thing, I think a large number of people are into IPA's because it is so trendy to be into them.

    Personally I prefer Porter's and Stouts, Belgiums and sours over any other beer type. Then barely-wines, then Reds, then Browns, then Pales, then IPA's.

    To each his own.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Hungus View Post
    I feel bad for you. You're missing out on a lot of great beers. Also, as has been pointed out, IPAs and Stouts are both Ales.
    I like what I like as well. I'd love to try more sour's or other types, but I'm pretty certain I don't appreciate lagers or pilsners (at least the American versions?), and as far as other beers go... it's hard when I'm at the liquor store or in the beer aisle to justify paying like $8-12 for a beer I haven't tried and may not like. I'd rather just buy what I know I'll enjoy

    Maybe that's where beer tastings/fests come in, but I've actually yet to attend one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by miss rides a lot View Post
    ... it's hard when I'm at the liquor store or in the beer aisle to justify paying like $8-12 for a beer I haven't tried and may not like. I'd rather just buy what I know I'll enjoy

    Maybe that's where beer tastings/fests come in, but I've actually yet to attend one.
    I recently went to a family & friend gathering where each person brought a mixed six pack (or had their spouse pick and bring a mixed six pack) and we had a blind tasting party. We were poured 1-2 oz glasses, one at a time, to smell - taste - enjoy - discuss - rate and write notes on, after which, the beer was revealed to us. That's where I confirmed my dislike of lagars. At the end of the night we were able to sample about 36 different beers, without getting drunk, and have notes about what we tasted and why we liked (or disliked) them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gsoroos View Post
    I recently went to a family & friend gathering where each person brought a mixed six pack (or had their spouse pick and bring a mixed six pack) and we had a blind tasting party. We were poured 1-2 oz glasses, one at a time, to smell - taste - enjoy - discuss - rate and write notes on, after which, the beer was revealed to us. That's where I confirmed my dislike of lagars. At the end of the night we were able to sample about 36 different beers, without getting drunk, and have notes about what we tasted and why we liked (or disliked) them.
    Yep, or getting a taster platter at a brewery, some tap rooms do this as well. Then its usually 2oz to 4oz tasters of several beers.
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    "I feel like I am missing out on something, but my taste buds lead me to other types of beer more along the lines of a Guinness... :

    Man, Guiness sucks. Try Lion Stout or Samuel Smith's Imperial Stout. I'm not going to try to talk you into IPAs, either you like them or you don't.
    So it seems to me to be, this thing that I think I see.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gsoroos View Post
    Or Gruit, (ale fermented with various other herbs). I've been thinking of experimenting with some flavors for brewing a gruit.
    FWIW the "sedative" effects of hops have never actually been clinically proven. The sexual desire thing, on the other hand, is pretty accurate since hops contain compounds shown to be estrogen agonists. Realistically alcohol is a CNS depressant which does the job far better than the hops would.

    Quote Originally Posted by GeePhroh View Post
    Hmmm...this is all very interesting. IPAs are practically a benchmark for brewers up my way in Seattle (though it's probably more accurate to call them "NW" or "West Coast" style, if you've ever had a classic English IPA); but over the last 5-7 years or so, IPAs have fallen out of favor somewhat amongst many of the cutting-edge brewers. While it may not account for most of their revenues, there is certainly a lot more hype around Belgian and German styles.
    We were referring more to the fact that the craft beer industry as a whole still thinks IPAs are trendy. Which is why most new breweries' flagship beer is a hoppy IPA. Boneyard is a great example - the first two beers they made were both IPAs, along with almost every other brewery that has opened in Bend in the last 10 years. I think it's because it's fairly easy to make a palatable IPA, so new breweries turn to it as a foundation product.

    Quote Originally Posted by miss rides a lot View Post
    I like what I like as well. I'd love to try more sour's or other types, but I'm pretty certain I don't appreciate lagers or pilsners (at least the American versions?), and as far as other beers go... it's hard when I'm at the liquor store or in the beer aisle to justify paying like $8-12 for a beer I haven't tried and may not like. I'd rather just buy what I know I'll enjoy
    Try Victory Prima Pils, Lagunitas Pils, or New Belgium Shift (hoppy pale lager). Awesome beers.

    Also, there are a lot of dark lagers, not just the American Pale Lagers you haven't liked. Think German beers - bocks, keller biers, marzens, dunkel and helles lagers. Some of those beers come in at 8% or more and have a grain bill reminiscent of a stout or porter.

    Quote Originally Posted by gsoroos View Post
    IThat's where I confirmed my dislike of lagars.
    Very cool you had a tasting, but see my comment above. You probably dislike American Pale Lagers, but the term "lager" covers much more than just light straw-colored beer.

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    To me it is weather dependent. I like to drink more IPAs and wheat beer in the spring/summer and more stouts/darker beers in the fall and winter.

    I do find the west coast love of an IPA interesting. I went to green flash brewery in San Diego and the majority of their drafts were very hoppy. Another place I went to in the winter had six of their eight taps reserved for IPAs. Back in Atlanta I would have only seen one IPA.

  33. #33
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    Interesting responses so far. Had no idea that so many people were in the same boat as me regarding the taste of IPAs.

    I should get out and try some DIPAs perhaps if they taste less like a pine tree in my glass.

    For anyone in the S. California region, I highly recommend the beer fest put on by Stone. It was at the CSUSM campus of all places. About 50 beers to choose from well beyond Stone products too..


  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by xcguy View Post
    "I feel like I am missing out on something, but my taste buds lead me to other types of beer more along the lines of a Guinness... :

    Man, Guiness sucks. Try Lion Stout or Samuel Smith's Imperial Stout. I'm not going to try to talk you into IPAs, either you like them or you don't.
    Guinness tastes great to me. I do understand that it is a well known beer and is quite trendy but I don't care. In my opinion, it is extremely smooth and easy to drink.

    You certainly aren't going to impress any beer aficionados showing up with a six pack of Guinness...that is understood

    I do want to try the Lion Stout and SSIS you recommend. I have heard good things about both.

    thx

  35. #35
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    Well I don't know about it being a fad or only 10 or 15 years old. I started drinking IPAs almost exactly twenty years ago. I liked ale in general and found I liked the IPAs the best. They just seemed to have the right amount of bitterness and flavor in general to my liking. I and a lot of of other people were drinking them long before they were trendy. I think they are trendy because they taste good. The trendiness of them has resulted in better and better IPAs over the years.

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    Lagers are beers for people with no taste, and poor judgement. Darks are reserved for those who will subject themselves to syrupy foul liquids only to wake up to mud-butt and regret and disregard fine taste completely.

    IPA's are reserved for the finest of us, the most astute of beer drinkers. Those of us with better judgement, and fine taste. Savor the pine! All the rest is the devils beer.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    Lagers are beers for people with no taste, and poor judgement.
    Right. This beer at 12% abv is for someone with no taste. Good talk.


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    Quote Originally Posted by rydbyk View Post
    Guinness tastes great to me.
    ...
    You certainly aren't going to impress any beer aficionados showing up with a six pack of Guinness...that is understood
    Drink what you like, and don't care who you impress.


    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    Lagers are beers for people with no taste, and poor judgement. Darks are reserved for those who will subject themselves to syrupy foul liquids only to wake up to mud-butt and regret and disregard fine taste completely.

    IPA's are reserved for the finest of us, the most astute of beer drinkers. Those of us with better judgement, and fine taste. Savor the pine! All the rest is the devils beer.
    You don't sound like the kind of person I'd want to drink beer with...

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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    Lagers are beers for people with no taste, and poor judgement. Darks are reserved for those who will subject themselves to syrupy foul liquids only to wake up to mud-butt and regret and disregard fine taste completely.

    IPA's are reserved for the finest of us, the most astute of beer drinkers. Those of us with better judgement, and fine taste. Savor the pine! All the rest is the devils beer.
    LOL, assuming sarcasm this is freaking funny.

    Assuming you are speaking seriously...... your wrong, that's it.
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    I admire those who can drink "anything". I have a friend who, when I pop some IPA favorite of mine will say "hey, this is great ". Then he'll spend all afternoon on his porch drinking Full Sail Session with his crew.
    So it seems to me to be, this thing that I think I see.

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    For me......IPAs are more fun.....I am to the point where ales/lagers without enough hops is just plain boring.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Guerdonian View Post
    LOL, assuming sarcasm this is freaking funny.

    Assuming you are speaking seriously...... your wrong, that's it.
    I know a few guys that feel the same way. There are plenty of beer types that I don't appreciate, but I don't generally hate on people for drinking them. Well, except Bud/Coors types They are more affordable; I'll have to give them that.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by miss rides a lot View Post
    I know a few guys that feel the same way. There are plenty of beer types that I don't appreciate, but I don't generally hate on people for drinking them. Well, except Bud/Coors types They are more affordable; I'll have to give them that.
    Honestly, I'd rather drink some Coors Lights with people that don't take themselves too seriously than drink the best IPAs with people who think they know it all.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Hungus View Post
    Honestly, I'd rather drink some Coors Lights with people that don't take themselves too seriously than drink the best IPAs with people who think they know it all.
    WISDOM!



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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Hungus View Post
    Honestly, I'd rather drink some Coors Lights with people that don't take themselves too seriously than drink the best IPAs with people who think they know it all.
    I don't remotely claim to know it all (beers or otherwise), but I'm not a fan of Coors Sorry!

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guerdonian View Post
    LOL, assuming sarcasm this is freaking funny.
    Someone got it. Thread needed some wild IPA enthusiasm

    I dig ipas. I dont think beer drinking is that serious though. Ive covered my bases with most beers, I can appreciate anything well brewed.

    Honestly, IPA's are a little more palatable than some more craft beers, and lower ABV (not counting triples etc). Some of these 10+% beers get you too wrecked to really enjoy or go out and taste a bunch of them. Some sours and belgians have some serious flavor, its kind of like a very harsh red wine. Too overwhelming for most people to appreciate.

    I think the craft taste and comparative "lightness" of ipas make them popular.

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    I drink a lot of coors and bud too Try hanging out and drinking IPA's all night and the bathroom will be your friend that day.. and the next day.

  48. #48
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    One Pivot, that was hilarious. I got the sarcasm straight away.

    I got into IPA's about six years ago. I knew nothing about beer and my friends were into it more than me (now I'm into it more than them, go figure) and would always force them on me. Just try a sip of this one, they would say. I'm adventurous and willing to try anything so I would always give them a go. Found one I thought palatable and my obsession grew from there. I'm into a hugely broad spectrum of styles and flavors and don't really think it's a fair thing to compare two styles since they're not the same catagory. A bit like comparing rap to punk.

    I'll drink anything, even PBR. I'll complain about it for a bit but always end up drinking it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's View Post
    Id scrap the passion forum all together, its a breeding ground for unicorn milkers, rainbow chasers and candy cotton farters.

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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    Someone got it. Thread needed some wild IPA enthusiasm

    I dig ipas. I dont think beer drinking is that serious though. Ive covered my bases with most beers, I can appreciate anything well brewed.

    Honestly, IPA's are a little more palatable than some more craft beers, and lower ABV (not counting triples etc). Some of these 10+% beers get you too wrecked to really enjoy or go out and taste a bunch of them. Some sours and belgians have some serious flavor, its kind of like a very harsh red wine. Too overwhelming for most people to appreciate.

    I think the craft taste and comparative "lightness" of ipas make them popular.
    I'll admit you got me. I think there is a segment of the beer drinking population that feels like IPA is the only style that matters. I admittedly find this slightly annoying.

    You bring up a good point on the perceived "lightness" of IPA's. I wonder if in some way their popularity is based on their "lighter" appearance which might make them a bit more approachable to someone who is just getting into beer and perceives darker beers as too "heavy".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Hungus View Post
    I'll admit you got me. I think there is a segment of the beer drinking population that feels like IPA is the only style that matters. I admittedly find this slightly annoying.

    You bring up a good point on the perceived "lightness" of IPA's. I wonder if in some way their popularity is based on their "lighter" appearance which might make them a bit more approachable to someone who is just getting into beer and perceives darker beers as too "heavy".
    You're overthinking it. I drink IPAs because of the taste. If I don't like the taste of a beer of whatever variety I won't drink it. I like the taste of IPAs. Not all of them but if I had to choose one or two to drink solely they'd both be IPAs.
    So it seems to me to be, this thing that I think I see.

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    Love the IPA's unless they overdue it on the hops

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    I love candy, unless they overdo it on the sugar.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's View Post
    Id scrap the passion forum all together, its a breeding ground for unicorn milkers, rainbow chasers and candy cotton farters.

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    I find that the hoppiness of an IPA is at first an acquired taste that can then become addicting - kinda like hot sauce. At first it's unappealing, but with more tries you develop a palate, and eventually get into the habit of pushing the taste (meausred in IBUs for beer, Scoville Heat Units for sauce) further and further.

    I also agree with someone's earlier point that because the most mainstream breweries are unlikely to produce IPAs due to their limited appeal, they are more popular with micros.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by xcguy View Post
    "I feel like I am missing out on something, but my taste buds lead me to other types of beer more along the lines of a Guinness... :

    Man, Guiness sucks. Try Lion Stout or Samuel Smith's Imperial Stout. I'm not going to try to talk you into IPAs, either you like them or you don't.
    I don't think Guiness sucks at all. It's just a different kind of stout, not at all as rich or flavorful as many others, but it is not supposed to be. But I think it is a great choice when I want to drink something that goes down easy, clean and refreshing, but still has flavor. Low cal, too. As awesome as many Imperial Stouts are, they are simply a whole different animal from something like Guiness. It's apples and oranges.
    15mm is a second-best solution to a problem that was already solved.

  55. #55
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    You haven't had a Guiness until you have had one in Ireland! Yum. Has nothing to do with American IPAs or stouts though. Different thing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FX4 View Post
    You haven't had a Guiness until you have had one in Ireland! Yum. Has nothing to do with American IPAs or stouts though. Different thing.
    I'll second that. Once you have one from the Guiness factory, you can't really drink 'em back over in the States anymore.

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    Quote Originally Posted by baybiker9 View Post
    I'll second that. Once you have one from the Guiness factory, you can't really drink 'em back over in the States anymore.
    I'd love to taste a Guiness like it's supposed to taste, not the yuck that is available here in the US of A (sorry Guiness lovers). There are just so many others available here that are better than Guiness.
    So it seems to me to be, this thing that I think I see.

  58. #58
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    What happened to me was I started drinking IPA's and I can't go back to anything else. Everything else I try doesn't have the pow flavor profile I now require. It's like IPA's have done something to my palette. Yeah I know everyone is different, yeah I know people are going to say I haven't tried this or that. But, my point is that is what I believe is the cause of the popularity. The big beer hoppy off the scale flavor. Just my two cents. I don't know jack about beer. Just that if I stop drinking it, Stone and a few others will notice it on their spreadsheets.
    Ride it like you stole it.

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    Most american big brewers use rice as the grain of choice to build up sugars in the wort. It was like coffee 20 years ago in this country, We didn't know what we were missing. My parents drank folgers and Uban. Then whole bean coffee started to be more and more common in the stores. Most IPA's are brewed with real ingrediants and not overely processed. With all the choices of grains, HOPS and even yeast strains they become an art form as well.

  60. #60
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    IPA's are good summer beers to, very smooth and refreshing on a hot day

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by baybiker9 View Post
    I find that the hoppiness of an IPA is at first an acquired taste that can then become addicting - kinda like hot sauce. At first it's unappealing, but with more tries you develop a palate, and eventually get into the habit of pushing the taste (meausred in IBUs for beer, Scoville Heat Units for sauce) further and further.

    I also agree with someone's earlier point that because the most mainstream breweries are unlikely to produce IPAs due to their limited appeal, they are more popular with micros.
    Hot sauce was invented to mask the taste of spoiled meats. High IBUs is just an attempt to mask crap beer...

    Just kidding..

    I have not completely written off IPAs. I can definitely see how they are an acquired taste and a fun style to learn to appreciate...

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    In my country, the Netherlands, beer = watery lager by Inbev or some other megacorp. I am glad that I discovered local breweries with all kinds of great IPA's, stouts, smoked, Kölsch, zwarzbier.

  63. #63
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    Didn't Inbev buy all the crappy brewers in the U.S. too?

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    Lagers are beers for people with no taste, and poor judgement. Darks are reserved for those who will subject themselves to syrupy foul liquids only to wake up to mud-butt and regret and disregard fine taste completely.

    IPA's are reserved for the finest of us, the most astute of beer drinkers. Those of us with better judgement, and fine taste. Savor the pine! All the rest is the devils beer.
    THIS!

    Honestly, IPA's are an acquired taste and if you're still on pilsners and lagers then you're still in the "training wheel stages" of beer drinking.

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
    Last edited by Gman086; 09-20-2012 at 03:14 PM.
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  65. #65
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    ^^^^ Pretty dang sure you are a spammer.
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  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guerdonian View Post
    ^^^^ Pretty dang sure you are a spammer.
    WTF?! First time I've ever been accused of that!!! Pretty dang sure you're a poser!

    Have FUN!

    G MAN
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  67. #67
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    ^^^^ Pretty dang sure you are a spammer.
    Where'd that come from? Did I miss something?
    Ride it like you stole it.

  68. #68
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    Here's how I see it playing out:

    G MAN posts, spam-bot posts, Guerdonian calls out spam-bot, mods remove spam, it subsequently looks like Guerdonian called G MAN a spammer, G MAN flips ****, Deano thinks he may have missed something, I post this; Guerdonian may or may not corroborate my story. Yay.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's View Post
    Id scrap the passion forum all together, its a breeding ground for unicorn milkers, rainbow chasers and candy cotton farters.

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by monzie View Post
    Here's how I see it playing out:

    G MAN posts, spam-bot posts, Guerdonian calls out spam-bot, mods remove spam, it subsequently looks like Guerdonian called G MAN a spammer, G MAN flips ****, Deano thinks he may have missed something, I post this; Guerdonian may or may not corroborate my story. Yay.
    Then I neg rep all of you just for good measure!
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  70. #70
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    I think I speak for all of us here when I say "huh?"
    So it seems to me to be, this thing that I think I see.

  71. #71
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    I drink whatever beer tastes nice to me - not so I can talk about it like a wine toff.

    My case in point:
    http://youtu.be/RjIoJGyhAgk

  72. #72
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    'cause hops are like crack?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IPA popularity-lupulin.jpg  


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    hi. my name is JC and i'm a recovering hophead.

    I used to be all IPAs all the time. But i think beer prefernces change all the time. And right now I prefer pilsners, light lagers...hell, i'm even enjoying the O'fest / Marzen beers right now.

    But I'm drinking a Bridgeport Kingpin while I make my daughter and I dinner!

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by monzie View Post
    Here's how I see it playing out:

    G MAN posts, spam-bot posts, Guerdonian calls out spam-bot, mods remove spam, it subsequently looks like Guerdonian called G MAN a spammer, G MAN flips ****, Deano thinks he may have missed something, I post this; Guerdonian may or may not corroborate my story. Yay.
    LMAO! Okay, I think you nailed it. Sorry Guerdonian!

    Carry on and CHEERS!

    G MAN

    PS - Great post JChasse!
    "There's two shuttles, one to the top and one to the hospital" I LOVE this place!!!

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    I used to despise IPAs until one night after a long cold ride. Got back to the truck and someone cracked open and IPA and handed it over...can't turn down a free beer, so I went for it. I don't know what happened that night but i've been hooked to IPA since. Ranger is a favorite and easy to find. Snake dog IPA, Dog fish head 60 minute IPA, Aviator Hog Wild IPA are some of my favorites. Something about that bitterness just works for me.

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    thanks for sharing

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    I got hooked on IPA during last cross season... they seem to go great with biking!

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by thisisbenji View Post
    I got hooked on IPA during last cross season... they seem to go great with biking!
    Yes, I can see how an IPA pairs well with cold weather, rain and mud

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    Seems everyone I talk to, work their way up to the IPA's. Not sure I like em' too hoppy for me. I suppose the high Alc content is benefit.

  80. #80
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    IPA's are always what I drink unless there is a free option. I'm not much into beer, and IPA is the only type I enjoy the taste of, never went through any other stages. I'm glad they are much more available now, used to be my only option pretty much was to get a growler at Phantom Canyon in Colorado Springs. Still can't beat their creamy bitterness from a bottle, and basement temp really lets you taste it.

  81. #81
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    IPA's are definitely an acquired taste, but once you have it, look out. There is also nothing better in the world than a great bike ride followed by a great IPA.

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    I've been a big IPA fan for a few years now. I think the draw is simplification & amplification - they simplify what makes a good brew (hoppy flavor, no extreme flourishes or flavors) and amplify those qualities, often resulting in a higher gravity & stronger flavor. They are a beer drinker's beer, and I'd agree somewhat of an acquired taste. It's easy for them to seem like too much at first, but stick with it and good things will happen. Perfect post-ride brew.

  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by rydbyk View Post
    They taste like they have tree sap brewed into them or something of that nature. Is just the high amount of hops?
    Yup, the extra hops is what makes an IPA taste that way. I wouldn't call it like tree sap though. I love IPAs. They gotta be nice and cold though. It's not hard to acquire a taste for them. They taste just like a lager, but more hoppy. Another good thing about a beer that is high in hoppiness is that hops are supposed to act like an anti-inflammatory so if your aching after a hard ride, and IPA is a perfect choice.

  84. #84
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    I got into IPAs because they're everywhere. The main local brewery here in Kansas City, Boulevard, has been making their Pale Ale for years, and it's one of their most popular beers. Therefore it's available at every bar, liquor store, convenience store and grocery store in the area. It might not be a "true" IPA, but drinking it made me realize I liked hoppy beers, and sent me down a slippery, albeit delicious, slope.
    Everything in moderation. Including moderation.

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    Ipa

    Check out Moylans, Novato, CA
    4-5 diffeent IPA's and a good place to find one you like.

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    I'm a strait hop head and drink them almost exclusively. But that's not to say I won't drink some other fine crafted beers. Personally I think brewers as a whole are putting a lot of efforts into making the ultimate IPA. Because of this we are all reaping the benefits....... One non IPA I am looking forward to trying is the laguanitas brown shugga. I have heard great things.

  87. #87
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    I just can't get into them...not refreshing to me at all with all the hops...but then again...I usually just drink Coors Light

    I like most Pale Ales..that is about as much hops as I can stand.
    Last edited by TiGeo; 11-30-2012 at 07:12 PM.
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    Finally its Friday, Aaaaaah!!

    IPA popularity-ipa.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by danorano View Post
    Yup, the extra hops is what makes an IPA taste that way. I wouldn't call it like tree sap though. I love IPAs. They gotta be nice and cold though. It's not hard to acquire a taste for them. They taste just like a lager, but more hoppy. Another good thing about a beer that is high in hoppiness is that hops are supposed to act like an anti-inflammatory so if your aching after a hard ride, and IPA is a perfect choice.
    You're right, I wouldn't call it tree sap either. I believe the term they use to describe that flavor is resinous or piney.
    Quote Originally Posted by Tone's View Post
    Id scrap the passion forum all together, its a breeding ground for unicorn milkers, rainbow chasers and candy cotton farters.

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    You gotta warm up a good IPA to get the taste! Too cold numbs them, removes the pinesol taste

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    Personally, I think many brewers hop away their mistakes. I love ipa's along with many other styles off beers. But I have noticed that many of the ipa's are hoppy without balance. But one thing I haven't considered when tasting these beers on tap is that they may have been flavored for bottling. I usually don't drink much beer at home because there are great beers on tap everywhere in Portland.

    I thing I do agree with a previous poster is that most of the time ipa's are served way too cold. I'll often order two in non chilled glasses and experience the beer as it warms up.

    Bridgeport used to have hand pulled ipa's way back in the day. Ummm, that brings back some good memories.

    But I'll drink many different styles of beer. Honestly the best beer is a free beer. If your buying, I'll probably drink it with a smile as long as its a craft style beer.

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by CuzinMike View Post
    I got into IPAs because they're everywhere. The main local brewery here in Kansas City, Boulevard, has been making their Pale Ale for years, and it's one of their most popular beers. Therefore it's available at every bar, liquor store, convenience store and grocery store in the area. It might not be a "true" IPA, but drinking it made me realize I liked hoppy beers, and sent me down a slippery, albeit delicious, slope.
    They make the Doublewide IPA which is very tasty as well!

  93. #93
    mnoutain bkie rdier
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poe4soul View Post
    Personally, I think many brewers hop away their mistakes. I love ipa's along with many other styles off beers. But I have noticed that many of the ipa's are hoppy without balance. But one thing I haven't considered when tasting these beers on tap is that they may have been flavored for bottling. I usually don't drink much beer at home because there are great beers on tap everywhere in Portland.

    I thing I do agree with a previous poster is that most of the time ipa's are served way too cold. I'll often order two in non chilled glasses and experience the beer as it warms up.

    Bridgeport used to have hand pulled ipa's way back in the day. Ummm, that brings back some good memories.

    But I'll drink many different styles of beer. Honestly the best beer is a free beer. If your buying, I'll probably drink it with a smile as long as its a craft style beer.
    Yeh, I have heard that it is easy to mask brewing mistakes with lots of hops in an IPA.. Apparently you don't use an IPA to determine who is the most skilled brewer out there.. not sure if this is correct...just been told this.

  94. #94
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    It gets me drunk on a "low" budget.

  95. #95
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    I enjoy IPAs for their complex bitter tastes. They are definitely an acquired taste but are definitely at the top of my list.

  96. #96
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    for me why i like IPA's, Dipa's, triple IPA's(weyerbacher hop'solutely) is simple, i used to like weed, the smell feel taste of good bud was awesome, but i have a job that does random testing, enter the humble hop, distant cousin of weed, that resiny goodnees, the aroma, ah I love hops, strange right? but thats just me

  97. #97
    Evolutionsverlierer
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    reported

  98. #98
    Except when I'm driving
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    I used to not like IPAs now I don't want anything else. I'm not sure what happened, maybe I just grew to like it after drinking so many pilsners and having to get up 5 times a night to piss. I think the aroma of the hops puts you in some sort of trance like state also, a different feeling than less hoppy ales. I would agree that drinking an IPA or two or three after a ride makes everything good.
    I'm bored and at work or else I would be riding

  99. #99
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    Hop Shortage from Knee Deep Brewing. #sogood

  100. #100
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    I need to try this


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