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  1. #1
    No, that's not phonetic
    Reputation: tscheezy's Avatar
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    ... and if we just ... Deschutes Brewery. Can I get a witness?

    OMFG, I just love it. My faves are the Obsidian Stout and Inversion IPA.



    Post-forest fire charred-earth black stoutness and pucker-inducing hoppy IPA-idnous. Yumba. A damn fine alcoholic kick to boot. Some of their other varieties sort of leave me flat, but given the two mentioned above, I'll forgive them.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  2. #2
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    Inversion Rocks my face. A twelve pack is a perfect weekend.

  3. #3
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    I love Deschutes. I miss the Quail Springs IPA. If you can find it, the Hop Trip is thee finest beer I have ever had the pleasure of drinking.

    The Bachelor ESB is a nice beer too. Kind of a cross between the Obsidian and IPA.
    Arron
    2010 Felt - New Belgium Fat Tire Cruiser!!!
    2007 Kona Cinder Cone
    1996 Trek 930 commuter

  4. #4
    N8!
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    They make one of THE BEST Porters also!!!

    Black Butte Porter

  5. #5
    Monterey Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by N8!
    They make one of THE BEST Porters also!!!

    Black Butte Porter
    yummmm
    "The bitterness of poor quality lingers long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten."

  6. #6
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    I've drank too much black butte in my time, great porter for the price, but I have moved on to rogue mocha porter... The Hop Trip is a fine IPA.
    They have a seasonal called cinder cone that is just spectacular.

  7. #7
    No, that's not phonetic
    Reputation: tscheezy's Avatar
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    I totally forgot about the Quail Springs stuff. That was nice. I wonder where it went? The Buzz Saw, Red Tail, and some of the others I find to be pretty bland. It's like they ran out of ingredients after the IPA, Stout, and Porter.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  8. #8
    TelemarkTumalo
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    I'm gonna miss this year's Juble Ale when it is gone. I thought it was a fine batch!
    [SIZE="6"][/SIZE]"Dang! You got shocks, pegs. Lucky!

  9. #9
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    Not to plug Bend's Big Fat Tour, but for those of you who missed it last year - not only was it great riding - but the party was at the Deschutes Brewing facility - look at the background of the first image and then all the swag you missed on the table.
    And then even better, the second photo is of us in front of KEGS of the brew!! It really did not get much better than that!
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Cog Wild Mountain Bike Tours
    Sponsored by Deschutes Brewery!!

  10. #10
    Prez NMBA
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    certainly one of the highlights of heading out west from good ol' PA, well right after all that amazing singletrack

  11. #11
    M070R-M0U7H FR3NCHI3
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    Quote Originally Posted by N8!
    They make one of THE BEST Porters also!!!

    Black Butte Porter
    fok yeah!!! having one as I type!!!

  12. #12
    I like pie
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    Quote Originally Posted by N8!
    They make one of THE BEST Porters also!!!

    Black Butte Porter
    You got a witness!

    A friend from PDX sent me a bottle of that among a few other goodies.

  13. #13
    Fat guy on a bike
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    I loves me some Mirror Pond Pale Ale (along with the rest).

    Grew up in eastern OR, Beaver by education

  14. #14
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    Mmmmmirror pond, inversion ... if you get the chance, during winter, the Cindercone IPA is great. But the best .... if you have an icecream maker - make the ice cream, but use Black Butte instead of milk .... and get a spoon.

    --B

  15. #15
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    Love Deschutes

    My favorite brewery by far. Love the Porter, Cinder Cone, Twilight, and Jubelale was awesome this year!! Anybody been lucky enough to get their hands on the Abyss??

  16. #16
    TelemarkTumalo
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    The Abyss is excellent and I would highly recommend that you give it a try. Even if you aren't partial to stouts, this one might make a believer out of you. Check out this review.

    The Anchorage Press, Anchorage Alaska

    Sometimes a stout just isn't enough. I like this style of dark beer a lot, and I drink a lot of it, but occasionally I crave something bigger. Imperial stout is the granddaddy of stouts, or perhaps the grandmother of stouts when you consider that original versions were designed to placate the Empress of Russia, Catherine the Great. Stouts were brewed in Britain for export to Russia, but just like long voyages affect beer we get here in the United States from abroad, the stouts that made the journey from Britain to Russia lost their vigor and charm when they arrived. By increasing the preserving hops, the beer's body and the unintended byproduct - booze - a truly imperial product was born. Maybe she was a lush, but Russia's Grand Cathy loved the stuff.

    Imperial stout gained popularity in the United States along with the craft beer movement. It's not as common as pale ales, porters and the more benign “regular” stouts, including dry versions (Guinness), sweet stouts (Mackeson's), oatmeal stouts (Glacier Brewhouse), Foreign stouts (Sheaf Stout) and American stouts (Alaskan Brewing Company's Stout). This is because it's much more time consuming and expensive to make, and it still has a limited following. But it's around, and increasingly complex examples are showing up here more and more frequently.

    Deschutes Brewing Company of Bend, Oregon launched its Reserve Series last year with Mirror Mirror, a barley wine with formidable flavor and punch. Aged in French oak wine barrels for four months, this monster-class beer instantly developed a huge cult following, and although Deschutes initially designed it to be produced just once, popular demand has brought it back. It started out in 2004 as a souped-up version of the brewery's immensely popular Jubelale, a seasonal wonder that's quite common in Anchorage in the winter months. Mirror Mirror weighs in at 9.8 percent alcohol.

    Not to be outdone, in December of 2006, Deschutes released The Abyss, an imperial stout that rattles the liver at 11 percent alcohol. I'm a huge Deschutes fan and can tell you that The Abyss is singularly the brewery's most complex and delicious beer so far.

    I first experienced this beer as a nightcap after having a number of other flavorful craft beers. This was good because any beer of this magnitude and strength is a sipper, not a quaffer. On a cold night in a remote cabin with a fire roasting behind me I used a knife to cut the sensual black wax from around the cap. I poured the oily wonder into a snifter and wondered if I needed to adjust or clean the flickering gas lamp because the beer looked black and opaque. A flashlight beam stabbed the glass and revealed in fact that no light escapes The Abyss. Black doesn't mean without character however. From under the full dark brown head escaped alluring scents including an ale's telltale fruitiness, dark roasted malts, chocolate, molasses, and hints of booze. I wasn't prepared for both the flavor and texture of this beer.

    Tempered perhaps by earlier sampling, the first sip was luscious, silky and mesmerizing with swirling flavors of robust malt, dry baker's chocolate, molasses and even hints of licorice and raisins. The sweet-centered beer seems to dissolve on the back of the palate after coating the mouth with a full and viscous body. Loose carbonation allows more of the beer's inherent creaminess to emerge. The formidable alcohol emerged after the swallow, warming the gullet on a cold, but increasingly cheery night. I'm glad I had someone to share it with, because polishing off a 22-ounce bomber of this stuff, as easy as it would be to do, would have polished me off as well.

    A second sample on a fresh palate at another time provided a slightly different experience. The nose on the brew was the same, but I experienced more intensity in roasted malt and hop-derived bitterness at the forefront, but not unpleasantly so. The beer just seemed a bit bigger all the way around and my sips were smaller and slower.

    Deschutes beers have a firm presence in Alaska, but as part of the brewery's Reserve Series, The Abyss is purposely fleeting. If you chase some down, buy more than one bottle. This stuff, if stored cool and dark, will last for years. If you miss it, hunt down Midnight Sun Brewing Company's Berserker, released at the brewery Friday, January 26 at 6 p.m. This 10 percent local behemoth could make you snow blind. This is the second year of production for Berserker. It's available in bottles and draught around town. And a special firkin of Berserker will be released at Café Amsterdam Saturday, February 3 at 6 p.m. If you want the royal treatment, imperial stouts were made for you.
    [SIZE="6"][/SIZE]"Dang! You got shocks, pegs. Lucky!

  17. #17
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    Yes, miss the Quail Springs too... Inversion was a decent replacement, but I want both!

    Oh, and just picked up my 1st Cinder Cone Red 6 pack of the season... REALLY good stuff!

  18. #18
    Tree Hugger
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    Quote Originally Posted by telemarktumalo
    The Abyss is excellent and I would highly recommend that you give it a try. Even if you aren't partial to stouts, this one might make a believer out of you. Check out this review.

    The Anchorage Press, Anchorage Alaska

    Sometimes a stout just isn't enough. I like this style of dark beer a lot, and I drink a lot of it, but occasionally I crave something bigger. Imperial stout is the granddaddy of stouts, or perhaps the grandmother of stouts when you consider that original versions were designed to placate the Empress of Russia, Catherine the Great. Stouts were brewed in Britain for export to Russia, but just like long voyages affect beer we get here in the United States from abroad, the stouts that made the journey from Britain to Russia lost their vigor and charm when they arrived. By increasing the preserving hops, the beer's body and the unintended byproduct - booze - a truly imperial product was born. Maybe she was a lush, but Russia's Grand Cathy loved the stuff.

    Imperial stout gained popularity in the United States along with the craft beer movement. It's not as common as pale ales, porters and the more benign “regular” stouts, including dry versions (Guinness), sweet stouts (Mackeson's), oatmeal stouts (Glacier Brewhouse), Foreign stouts (Sheaf Stout) and American stouts (Alaskan Brewing Company's Stout). This is because it's much more time consuming and expensive to make, and it still has a limited following. But it's around, and increasingly complex examples are showing up here more and more frequently.

    Deschutes Brewing Company of Bend, Oregon launched its Reserve Series last year with Mirror Mirror, a barley wine with formidable flavor and punch. Aged in French oak wine barrels for four months, this monster-class beer instantly developed a huge cult following, and although Deschutes initially designed it to be produced just once, popular demand has brought it back. It started out in 2004 as a souped-up version of the brewery's immensely popular Jubelale, a seasonal wonder that's quite common in Anchorage in the winter months. Mirror Mirror weighs in at 9.8 percent alcohol.

    Not to be outdone, in December of 2006, Deschutes released The Abyss, an imperial stout that rattles the liver at 11 percent alcohol. I'm a huge Deschutes fan and can tell you that The Abyss is singularly the brewery's most complex and delicious beer so far.

    I first experienced this beer as a nightcap after having a number of other flavorful craft beers. This was good because any beer of this magnitude and strength is a sipper, not a quaffer. On a cold night in a remote cabin with a fire roasting behind me I used a knife to cut the sensual black wax from around the cap. I poured the oily wonder into a snifter and wondered if I needed to adjust or clean the flickering gas lamp because the beer looked black and opaque. A flashlight beam stabbed the glass and revealed in fact that no light escapes The Abyss. Black doesn't mean without character however. From under the full dark brown head escaped alluring scents including an ale's telltale fruitiness, dark roasted malts, chocolate, molasses, and hints of booze. I wasn't prepared for both the flavor and texture of this beer.

    Tempered perhaps by earlier sampling, the first sip was luscious, silky and mesmerizing with swirling flavors of robust malt, dry baker's chocolate, molasses and even hints of licorice and raisins. The sweet-centered beer seems to dissolve on the back of the palate after coating the mouth with a full and viscous body. Loose carbonation allows more of the beer's inherent creaminess to emerge. The formidable alcohol emerged after the swallow, warming the gullet on a cold, but increasingly cheery night. I'm glad I had someone to share it with, because polishing off a 22-ounce bomber of this stuff, as easy as it would be to do, would have polished me off as well.

    A second sample on a fresh palate at another time provided a slightly different experience. The nose on the brew was the same, but I experienced more intensity in roasted malt and hop-derived bitterness at the forefront, but not unpleasantly so. The beer just seemed a bit bigger all the way around and my sips were smaller and slower.

    Deschutes beers have a firm presence in Alaska, but as part of the brewery's Reserve Series, The Abyss is purposely fleeting. If you chase some down, buy more than one bottle. This stuff, if stored cool and dark, will last for years. If you miss it, hunt down Midnight Sun Brewing Company's Berserker, released at the brewery Friday, January 26 at 6 p.m. This 10 percent local behemoth could make you snow blind. This is the second year of production for Berserker. It's available in bottles and draught around town. And a special firkin of Berserker will be released at Café Amsterdam Saturday, February 3 at 6 p.m. If you want the royal treatment, imperial stouts were made for you.
    Excellent review. You are quite the poet when it comes to describing beer experiences. Let's hear more reviews!
    I love mankind - it's people I can't stand. ~Charles M. Schulz

  19. #19
    Terror of Sidewalls
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    I just saw that bombers of their Hophenge Imperial IPA were available again last week while perusing the beer shop. I had a couple last year and it is something else. I'm a hophead all the way, but this beer was so hopped out to the stratosphere it was actually too much to remain anywhere near balanced. My friend who is a certified beer judge called it an "interesting novelty" Worth a try if you get the chance...

  20. #20
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    Fridge is all stocked up with Inversion IPA and Mirror Pond Pale Ale. I just finished off the last of my Cinder Cones and need to get more while it is on sale

    I am normally a Stone Brewing fan, but the Deschutes stuff has been so good lately, I just can't get enough.

  21. #21
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    The only one I've had the pleasure to drink is the Black Butte Porter, and it was friggin' awesome. It was so good I brought the damn bottle home with me from Wyoming to Florida and have the bottle in my closet. I envy all you who have this great beers available to you on a regular basis.

  22. #22
    Afric Pepperbird
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    I'm a poor soul who lives three miles from the Deschutes Brewery downtown pub. After a long ride, it's conveniently located on my way home

    My favorites are Inversion IPA, Bachelor Bitter (the best session beer in the world, bar none!), and Abyss (when available, and I have some "pocket change"). Green Lakes Organic is also growing on me rapidly.

    I only wish we had 4000 square feet, like the new Portland brewpub. Damn, it can get crowded.

  23. #23
    shred
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    BEER ITS WHATS FOR DINNER

  24. #24
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    Yeah, anyone been the new Portland brewpub yet?

  25. #25
    Known Mountainbiker
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    I often feel sorry for those who do not live in the PNW. Sure, everyone claims to have the best singletrack and the best microbreweries but only the fortunate ones can ride the best singletrack then top it off with the best microbrews. I'd say Bend is at the top of that list. But, soon Oakridge's new brewery will open and that will all change.

    But for the record: Jubilale. My childhood anticipation of xmas is now an adulthood anticipation for this fine Deschutes' seasonal ale. (that and sierra nevada's celebration)

    Caz
    I am a Mountain Biker therefore I am late

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