Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    Beer Please!
    Reputation: Klurejr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    2,222

    Brewing Beer with Coffee

    Of those who brew, who has done so with Coffee before?

    I have heard of two main ways to do this, until today.

    Main ways:

    1> Brew a pot of coffee, chill it and pour it directly into the Keg or the bottling bucket.

    2> Take ground coffee beans in a steeping bag and drop it into the boil during the chilling process once you get the temperature to a point where the coffee will not go bad from the excessive heat.

    But today I stopped by Helms Brewing at Lunch to check it out and was asking about how they did their Coffee Porter and the brewer told me he tosses the freshly roasted (usually same day for them as they get the beans from Bird Rock Coffee Roasters in La Jolla) whole beans right in with the grain and lets the grain mill break them up and just mashes with them.

    He said considering the Mash is about a max temp of 152, that is right in line with coffee brewing temperatures, extracts all the flavor and the sour/burnt flavors you can get from boiling beans never happens because the beans are not in the boil at all.

    He also told me all the home brew forums will poopoo this idea and say to never do it, but the beer I tasted today was really good, the coffee was subtle, but it was there. Not too overpowering like some coffee beers can be. And this was his third batch so far, and he claims the beer has been consistent.

    I think I might want to try this method with the Stout recipe I have, I already know the exact Coffee Roast I want to use for it.

    What do you think?
    telling me to stay out of a former bombing range next to a dump while you build huge houses next to it? Screw you.-sandmangts

  2. #2
    Paper Mill Aleworks
    Reputation: JFryauff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,483
    I have never mashed with them, but it does sound interesting.
    My only fear (which may be unfounded), is that the boil would tend to diminish some of the aroma.

    My personal technique, which has worked wonderfully (for me), is to add some crushed beans at knock-out. Then I cold-press additional coffee, and add to the keg for better flavor/aroma integration.
    A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. - Winston Churchill

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    430
    I don't see why putting the beans in with the mash would be a bad thing at all.

    FWIW, the proper temperature to brew coffee is 190-200 F, so 152 is no where near too hot.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    585
    I've hand crushed the beans with a mortar and pestle then soaked them in a liquor and put them into a corny keg in a tea bag sorta setup. No brewing involved and still got great aroma and flavor results without the bitterness. Have also done this in a whiskey barrel with great results.

    Seems like if you were to put them in the boil you wouldn't want them in too long because you might get off flavors and it may become bitter. Think about when you brew coffee, it's pretty much involves pouring the hot water or steam over the grounds, not soaking them or boiling them for extended periods.

    I would say you should experiment with a few different ways and let us know what happens

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    679
    I think I'm going to have to try that. some of the volatile chemicals in the mash may boil off, but boiling coffee after it's brewed doesn't really mess with the flavor much. Similar concept to microwaving coffee once it's cooled off some.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    3
    A local brewery here does it by using a 24 hour cold brew then adding that to the beer. A cold brew results in a very non-bitter coffee. This is for an atypical coffee beer though. I usually think of coffee beers as stouts/porters. They do theirs with an ESB.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    679
    Do they add the cold brew extract to the mash before the boil though?

  8. #8
    Paper Mill Aleworks
    Reputation: JFryauff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,483
    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    Do they add the cold brew extract to the mash before the boil though?
    Probably not, as the heat in the prevailing boil will extract more bitterness than is usually desired.
    A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. - Winston Churchill

  9. #9
    Hi.
    Reputation: jtmartino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    3,869
    Hess has some of the freshest coffee flavors I've ever tasted in beer. Apparently they dry bean by adding roasted coffee to the fermenter - no heat at all.

    Putting the coffee into the boil will extract a lot of bitterness as JFryauff mentioned. I'd go his route or dry bean.

  10. #10
    Beer Please!
    Reputation: Klurejr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    2,222
    Quote Originally Posted by jtmartino View Post
    Hess has some of the freshest coffee flavors I've ever tasted in beer. Apparently they dry bean by adding roasted coffee to the fermenter - no heat at all.

    Putting the coffee into the boil will extract a lot of bitterness as JFryauff mentioned. I'd go his route or dry bean.
    Did you read my first post, I am not asking about adding coffee to the boil, but rather ground coffee to the Mash. With no beans in the Boil there is no Bitterness.
    telling me to stay out of a former bombing range next to a dump while you build huge houses next to it? Screw you.-sandmangts

  11. #11
    Paper Mill Aleworks
    Reputation: JFryauff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,483
    Quote Originally Posted by Klurejr View Post
    Did you read my first post, I am not asking about adding coffee to the boil, but rather ground coffee to the Mash. With no beans in the Boil there is no Bitterness.
    My only concern would be that you'd be boiling the already steep coffee after the mash, and that would draw out bitterness, while destroying some of the flavor/aroma profile as well.

    Cold press some coffee, set half aside, and boil the other half for 20 minutes or so...once the boiled half cooled, taste test.
    A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. - Winston Churchill

  12. #12
    Beer Please!
    Reputation: Klurejr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    2,222
    Quote Originally Posted by JFryauff View Post
    My only concern would be that you'd be boiling the already steep coffee after the mash, and that would draw out bitterness, while destroying some of the flavor/aroma profile as well.

    Cold press some coffee, set half aside, and boil the other half for 20 minutes or so...once the boiled half cooled, taste test.
    That is a thought.

    The main reason I made this thread is because Helms Brewing uses this process with their coffee beer and the results are amazing. Unless the head brewer was lying to my face about his process, which I do not think he was.
    telling me to stay out of a former bombing range next to a dump while you build huge houses next to it? Screw you.-sandmangts

  13. #13
    Paper Mill Aleworks
    Reputation: JFryauff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,483
    Quote Originally Posted by Klurejr View Post
    Unless the head brewer was lying to my face about his process, which I do not think he was.
    I'd go with this.



    It may work just beautifully, but I think it's a fairly unorthodox process.
    I'm brewing a Choc-Coffee stout Friday, and I'd love to say I'd give it a go, but this is a very important batch to be messing around/straying with.
    I have a Coffee Cascadian IPA coming up, and I can experiment with that one.
    A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. - Winston Churchill

  14. #14
    Hi.
    Reputation: jtmartino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    3,869
    Quote Originally Posted by Klurejr View Post
    Did you read my first post, I am not asking about adding coffee to the boil, but rather ground coffee to the Mash. With no beans in the Boil there is no Bitterness.
    Yeah I read it - was more responding to others posting in the thread.

    Overcooking coffee, as JFryauff mentioned, will kill a lot of the flavors. Coffee beer is actually pretty tricky stuff, as coffee aromatics are like hop aromatics. Volatile, delicate, and best consumed fresh.

    Have you had coffee beers from Hess? What did you think? Putting grounds into the fermenter works wonders for them, but realistically it may be easier to simply add coffee to beer. That's what Alesmith and the Bruery have done.

  15. #15
    Beer Please!
    Reputation: Klurejr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    2,222
    Quote Originally Posted by jtmartino View Post
    Have you had coffee beers from Hess? What did you think? Putting grounds into the fermenter works wonders for them, but realistically it may be easier to simply add coffee to beer. That's what Alesmith and the Bruery have done.
    I have not had any coffee beer from Hess, they are not bottling much of the beer they make yet.

    I love Alesmith Speedway and am familiar with the cold press technique afterwards, I was just so intrigued by adding the grounds to the mash and the results I tasted in the beer. I guess I would have to side by side them to really explain the difference to everyone.
    telling me to stay out of a former bombing range next to a dump while you build huge houses next to it? Screw you.-sandmangts

  16. #16
    Hi.
    Reputation: jtmartino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    3,869
    Quote Originally Posted by Klurejr View Post
    I have not had any coffee beer from Hess, they are not bottling much of the beer they make yet.

    I love Alesmith Speedway and am familiar with the cold press technique afterwards, I was just so intrigued by adding the grounds to the mash and the results I tasted in the beer. I guess I would have to side by side them to really explain the difference to everyone.
    Definitely take a drive down there! The Grazias and Induresca are pretty great beers. Don't get your hopes up about their IPAs. And if you don't like it, you can always walk over to Alesmith .

  17. #17
    Beer Please!
    Reputation: Klurejr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    2,222
    I have been to Hess before, a fantastic brewery. I need to get over to the new North Park Location. I just don't remember them having Grazias on tap during my last visit.

    Also, while at the Tasting room at Left Hand Brewery on Monday I tasted the Fade to Black Version 2 which is a coffee porter and was asking the people there about it.

    They put coffee grounds in a bag and "dry hopped" them after fermentation.

    They also said for another coffee beer they did they dumped whole beans directly into a Firkin for a cask beer they made.... So many ways to do it...

    If I had the time I would like to try multiple methods on the same recipe and see how much difference could be tasted.
    telling me to stay out of a former bombing range next to a dump while you build huge houses next to it? Screw you.-sandmangts

  18. #18
    Paper Mill Aleworks
    Reputation: JFryauff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,483
    Brewed a Choc-Coffee Stout last week, and used 3oz of coffee at KO. Took a gravity reading today, and the coffee aroma/taste is very nice.
    As nice as it is now, I will be adding more.
    I will be adding some to secondary, with cocoa nibs and other spices, as well as adding cold-press to the kegs.
    A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. - Winston Churchill

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    8
    This is an interesting thing to try. I haven't tasted any though as this is something not common in our place.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    7
    slightly unrelated, always thought making oatmeal using coffee and sugar would probably be great. or awful. one of the two.

  21. #21
    squish, squish in da fish
    Reputation: fishwrinkle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    987
    ^^^done it camping n its good

Similar Threads

  1. Coffee
    By francois in forum Off Camber (off topic)
    Replies: 106
    Last Post: 04-21-2014, 04:45 PM
  2. Coffee
    By Bro in forum Off Camber (off topic)
    Replies: 50
    Last Post: 10-22-2013, 07:54 PM
  3. Beer/Brewing Apps
    By Brewtality in forum Beer Forum
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 10-02-2013, 10:13 AM
  4. Beer with coffee in it?
    By Don Despacio in forum Beer Forum
    Replies: 76
    Last Post: 09-16-2011, 09:52 AM
  5. Ice Cold Lakefront Brewing Beer 4 trail workers 5-14
    By ~gomez~ in forum Minnesota, Wisconsin
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 05-13-2011, 07:06 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •