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  1. #1
    Lord Thunderbottom
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    Best "low IBU" brews

    This thread if for the guys that despise the bitter beer, yeah I know quit wining right, it's beer, STFU and drink up

    So strait to the point what's your favorite non-bitter beer?

    I'm looking for full flavors, roasted nutties, mellower stouts, and random awesome microbrews, with IBU's in the 20-40 range.

    Here's the flavor of the week at my place to get things started

    Tommynocker, Maple Nut Brown, IBU 20


  2. #2
    Paper Mill Aleworks
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    Although I don't despise brew with higher IBU's per se, there certainly are a lot of brews I enjoy that contain lower IBU's.

    Beers with a heavier malt presence will usually (not always) have lower IBU's, just enough to balance out the sweetness (porters, stouts, barley wines, belgians, etc).

    Even some double IPA's maintain enough sweetness, to balance the bittering of the hops well enough, so that you'll get all hop aroma.

    So, IBU levels don't always dictate the bitterness in a beers taste.
    Last edited by JFryauff; 01-27-2012 at 08:32 AM.
    A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. - Winston Churchill

  3. #3
    Beer Me!
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    I agree with Jfryauff (as usual)

    There are too many to mention exact names, but some styles you would enjoy are the following:

    Brown (and Nut Browns)
    Porters
    Stouts (oatmeal, milk, imperial) (Dry stouts / english stouts tend to by hoppier)
    Scottish Ales
    Wee Heavy Ales
    Wheat Beers
    Belgian Ales (Dubbels, Tripels, Quads, Strongs)
    Fruit Beers
    Bocks
    some lagers and pilsners

    Also if you go to a tap room, anything on Nitro will heavily reduce the bitterness of a beer, making it much creamier and smoother.

    I have had friends who can't stand any bitter flavor in beer at all. For example i gave a light pilsner to a friend, which in my opinion was very light and refreshing, and she pushed it away and said it was "Way to hoppy". I was almost stunned. I then gave her a chocolate stout, which still had decent IBU's but the malt character and the heavy chocolate flavor was enough for her to drink the glass.

    I am a fan of any IBU, high or low, as long as its executed well. I have had beers that are both too bitter and unbalanced, or overly malty with not a hint of any hop element at all.

  4. #4
    Hi.
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    Good info guys. It's all about balance.

  5. #5
    Lord Thunderbottom
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtmartino View Post
    Good info guys. It's all about balance.
    Very true, not the responses I was expecting but I completely agree with all of it, I certainly do want some hops but I'm really looking for a smooth finish

    So what's your favorite non-bitter tasting beer?

  6. #6
    Beer Me!
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    Still a hard question as ones perception of "bitter" varies heavily, and there are just to many to mention!

    Here are the few i have had in the past couple months:

    Celebrator Dopplebock
    Oscar Blues Old Chub
    Lefthand Nitro Milk Stout
    Odell Cutthroat Porter


    No idea what the IBU's are on those but, they are well ballanced, Not-hoppy, and seem to fit your desires. Unfortunately most are CO beers. Whenever i am asked, "whats your favorite beer in "blank" style?" i have a really hard time picking.

  7. #7
    Beer Me!
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    I don't think this will de-rail the thread, but i want to go on a little "rant". (uh oh )

    You don't have to read it, i have stated before that i am a recovering beer nerd, who is a pretentious A-hole.

    The IBU measurement (while i guess it is somewhat valuable) does not seem like a good all encompassing way to measure hoppy bitterness in a beer. For example the epic "100+ IBU" ipa's, or even more rediculouse the "1000+IBU" beers. I can't tell a dang difference between them once you get past the 100 mark. They are all like sucking on a hop cone. This is not necessarily a bad thing, but the numbers don't equate)

    If I tasted two beers of the same style with the exact same IBU, chances are the amount of bitterness i actually taste will be different between them. So many other factors go into the beers final flavor character that i just can't trust the Number. For example, 40 IBU's in a Pale Ale, and 40 IBU's in an irish stout taste completely different. Or 90 IBU in a barlywine and 90 IBU in IPA. Maybe my tongue just cant handle it all, and taps out once i start hammering it with a lot of flavor.

    I guess my point is, IBU is some sort of "standard" to measure bitterness, but the actual bitterness tasted is more based upon the balance of the beer, or the sensitivity of the drinker.

    So there is my 2cents of why IBU's can be silly.

  8. #8
    Hi.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guerdonian View Post
    I don't think this will de-rail the thread, but i want to go on a little "rant". (uh oh )
    I'd +rep you, but apparently I need to spread it around first. Great comment.

  9. #9
    Lord Thunderbottom
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    Correct me if I'm wrong but I believe IBU is strictly calculated by the acid from the hops rather than some magic scale that measures the beer as a whole post addition of the malt

    This would completely account for why different brews with the same IBU will have a different bitterness when tasting

    It's nice of some breweries to give us the information but it's not truly the information we're interested in as consumers

  10. #10
    Hi.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TitanofChaos View Post
    So what's your favorite non-bitter tasting beer?
    The list is too long to post!

    You said you want full flavors, nutty beers, and mellow stouts. Here are some suggestions:

    Bavarian beers: Weihenstephaner, Ayinger, Schneider Aventinus.
    Belgian Dubbels, Tripels, Quads: Rochefort, Maredsous, Chimay, Westmalle
    Scotch Ale/Wee Heavy: Alesmith Wee, Founders Backwoods, Dark Horse Scotty Karate


    You can also check out brown ales, and some amber/reds that are low-hop. Oatmeal stouts and milk stouts are good too.

    Typically, British, German, and Belgian beers are less hoppy than their American counterparts.

  11. #11
    Hi.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TitanofChaos View Post
    Correct me if I'm wrong but I believe IBU is strictly calculated by the acid from the hops rather than some magic scale that measures the beer as a whole post addition of the malt

    This would completely account for why different brews with the same IBU will have a different bitterness when tasting

    It's nice of some breweries to give us the information but it's not truly the information we're interested in as consumers
    Yep. It's all about how much hops are added at what point in the boil. You can have a non-bitter ale with huge hop aroma and flavor if most of the hops were added straight to the fermenter.

  12. #12
    Beer Me!
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtmartino View Post
    Yep. It's all about how much hops are added at what point in the boil. You can have a non-bitter ale with huge hop aroma and flavor if most of the hops were added straight to the fermenter.
    Correct. To get even more technical its measuring the Isomerized Alpha Acids contained within the beer. Isomerization happens during the boil, thus the multiple hop additions at different times. Different hops contain different amount of alpha acids, you will commonly hear "high alpha hops" among brewers, as these are desirable for IPA's. Isomerized alpha acids = bitterness. Probably more info than needed, but i thought it was interesting when i found

    I don't know to much about it in practicality but the EBU (European Bitterness Unit) is supposed to measure "perceived bitterness". Who knows how well this works, and havn't really taken the time to find out a beers EBU vs. IBU. From the little i know about the EBU it seems like a more pracital way to let the consumer know how bitter the beer actually tastes.

  13. #13
    Lord Thunderbottom
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    This thread is much more exciting than it's intention

  14. #14
    Beer Me!
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    Quote Originally Posted by TitanofChaos View Post
    This thread is much more exciting than it's intention
    HAHA, we tend to do that. What about sours? you should give those a shot. The opposite side of the spectrum of Bitter.

  15. #15
    Paper Mill Aleworks
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    Plus the measurable IBU standards only go up to like 200 or something (I'd have to check again), so these Mikkeller 1000 & 2007 IBU beers are purely speculative numbers.
    A fanatic is one who can't change his mind and won't change the subject. - Winston Churchill

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guerdonian View Post
    Correct. To get even more technical its measuring the Isomerized Alpha Acids contained within the beer. Isomerization happens during the boil, thus the multiple hop additions at different times. Different hops contain different amount of alpha acids, you will commonly hear "high alpha hops" among brewers, as these are desirable for IPA's. Isomerized alpha acids = bitterness. Probably more info than needed, but i thought it was interesting when i found

    I don't know to much about it in practicality but the EBU (European Bitterness Unit) is supposed to measure "perceived bitterness". Who knows how well this works, and havn't really taken the time to find out a beers EBU vs. IBU. From the little i know about the EBU it seems like a more pracital way to let the consumer know how bitter the beer actually tastes.
    I applied for that job but was rejected... I told them, "Give me a beer and I'll tell you how bitter it seems to be."


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