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  1. #1
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    Spitfire V1 vs V2

    I have owned a V1 Spitfire for more than a year now and I really like this bike. Still, it's hard to live with a bike when there's a newer version on the market, so please help me decide whether I should go for the new version or stay with my not so old nor outdated spitty.

    Stuff I like about my bike:
    -Overall Stiffness
    -Pedal efficiency
    -Durable painting
    -Geometry
    -Acceleration

    Stuff I dislike:
    -Harsh and flexy bottom out (and quite easy to do it)
    -No thru axle dropouts
    -Seat tube is a tad short for my dropper
    -It kind of bothers me to lubricate the axles every month

    What improvements can I expect from the V1 Spitfire? More travel and bearings are welcome, but apart from that? There's a thru axle option, right?

    BTW, my fork is a 150 mm revelation. Does it pair well with the new spit?

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amukinado View Post
    I have owned a V1 Spitfire for more than a year now and I really like this bike.
    if that's the case i would stick with it

    that said,

    Quote Originally Posted by Amukinado View Post
    -No thru axle dropouts
    -Seat tube is a tad short for my dropper
    -It kind of bothers me to lubricate the axles every month
    the new model accomodates just about any axle option you can think of. it runs on bearings rather than bushings, and though they haven't made a big stink about (not really their style) it i've heard the bearings that are being used are top-quality. from the numbers and sitting on my v2, the new frames are a tad longer in the tt but still short (for their sizing) in the seat tube (my large is an 18.5" [whereas i think most companies usually go 19"+ on a large] just like my rune v1), so you'd likely find it a bit low, still, and sizing up wouldn't be a slam dunk option

    Quote Originally Posted by Amukinado View Post
    BTW, my fork is a 150 mm revelation. Does it pair well with the new spit?
    that's what i'm planning on running. same stiffness as a fox 34 in my experience, which seems to be the popular choice. i think it will be a good fit, though maybe a bit shorter a2c that intended spec

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomforeal View Post
    if that's the case i would stick with it
    Makes sense, still I recon that if I like the V1, maybe I would like the V2 better. It's a bit like putting breast implants on my gf.

    From looking at the charts, I dare saying that the V2 main triangle stays exactly the same in terms of dimensions compared to my V1. So in terms of position I wouldn't even notice any change and the dropper post problem would still be there.
    Maybe going Large wouldn't be a bad option since I'm between sizes (I own a Medium). The other day I rode a Large Rune V1 and didn't even notice.

    That said, the improvements I spot are:
    -Bushings to bearings
    -127 mm to 140 mm of travel
    -Thru axle
    -More trail/enduro oriented geometry

    Now what I would like to know is how the KS Link rides compared to the V1 in terms of pedal efficiency and if it also bottoms out easily.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amukinado View Post
    Now what I would like to know is how the KS Link rides compared to the V1 in terms of pedal efficiency and if it also bottoms out easily.
    Not sure about efficiency but it pedals much much better, especially if you spend time in the little ring up front. Just feels much better.
    KS link is smoother on smaller bumps as there is less friction in the KS link.
    V2 is a much better bike than V1 when it comes to the suspension and rear-end stiffness. But if your main problem is just that you have to grease the axles with a grease gun once a month then I'd stick with the V1 if you don't have excess wear and didn't request an upgrade. That's peanuts compared to some of us who had to change bushings at least once a month if not every other week.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by cooldaddy View Post
    Not sure about efficiency but it pedals much much better, especially if you spend time in the little ring up front. Just feels much better.
    KS link is smoother on smaller bumps as there is less friction in the KS link.
    V2 is a much better bike than V1 when it comes to the suspension and rear-end stiffness.
    I use a 1x10 setup with a 34t single ring. I've been told that the KS Link was really good in terms of pedal efficiency but the owners never had a Banshee before.
    Coming from an Intense 6.6 and having tried lots of other bikes (like the covert and the bandit) I thought that the Spitfire V1 was by far the best pedalling bike out there, so it was hard to believe that the V2 was actually better. I mean, even more reactive to small bumps and a better pedaller? That bike's got to be tits... :P

    Quote Originally Posted by cooldaddy View Post
    But if your main problem is just that you have to grease the axles with a grease gun once a month then I'd stick with the V1 if you don't have excess wear and didn't request an upgrade. That's peanuts compared to some of us who had to change bushings at least once a month if not every other week.
    I can live with greasing the axles once a month... I just wanted some more travel, a thru axle and maybe a less slack geometry.

  7. #7
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    To echo what others have said, I loved my V1. At the time it was my favorite bike ever for many of the same reasons you stated. I got 2 good years out of my frame, although I was greasing and changing bushings pretty frequently, esp toward the end. The V2 frame is, IMO, better than the V1 in essentially every way. Stiffer without question, pedals better, all dropout options covered. I'm still fiddling with suspension set up, but thus far I'm pretty pleased (RP23 on mine).

    Do you need to upgrade? Absolutely not. But if you like the V1, I think you can't go wrong with the V2 if you go that route at some point.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by NCBigHit View Post
    To echo what others have said, I loved my V1. At the time it was my favorite bike ever for many of the same reasons you stated. I got 2 good years out of my frame, although I was greasing and changing bushings pretty frequently, esp toward the end. The V2 frame is, IMO, better than the V1 in essentially every way. Stiffer without question, pedals better, all dropout options covered. I'm still fiddling with suspension set up, but thus far I'm pretty pleased (RP23 on mine).

    Do you need to upgrade? Absolutely not. But if you like the V1, I think you can't go wrong with the V2 if you go that route at some point.
    That's the kind of answer that I was looking for.

    If I can sell my frame for a good price, I think I'll pull the trigger on a V2.

    What about weights? Do you notice the increase?

  9. #9
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    I haven't noticed a significant weight change. Neither of my spitfires were built super light (prob 30-31 pounds). I honestly think factors like tire, tire pressure, suspension set up and the pedaling characteristics of the bike will trump the difference in weight. FWIW, everyone that has hopped on my bike has commented about how well it pedals.

  10. #10
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    I've put my V1 for sale to raise some money for the V2. I should have done it last year when they had that loyalty discount but by then I was too busy building my Voltage FR.


    I've noticed lots of different shocks in the V2 builds that came up whereas in the V1 most of the builds had the RP23, as it was designed to be used with low volume cans. Can I use a high volume can in the V2? I was leaning towards a Monarch or even a Monarch Plus. Is this the right way to go?

  11. #11
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    The V2 spitfire has a completely different leverage curve (progressive rather than regressive), so I recommend running with a higher volume can. Monarch or monarch plus would both work well if tuned correctly.
    Banshee Bikes Designer
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by builttoride View Post
    The V2 spitfire has a completely different leverage curve (progressive rather than regressive), so I recommend running with a higher volume can. Monarch or monarch plus would both work well if tuned correctly.
    Cool! Thanks Keith.

  13. #13
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    Some more info you might find helpful. It's the Rune but the Spitfire should be pretty similar. Good stuff

    Google Translate
    2013 Banshee Spitfire V2 650b

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by builttoride View Post
    The V2 spitfire has a completely different leverage curve (progressive rather than regressive), so I recommend running with a higher volume can. Monarch or monarch plus would both work well if tuned correctly.
    Keith,
    Does that mean the V2 would be a good candidate for a coil shock?

  15. #15
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    Yes, you can run both large volume air shocks and coil shocks!

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoStyle View Post
    Yes, you can run both large volume air shocks and coil shocks!
    Awesome... Not that I can afford one, but Im thinking a Spitty v2 w/ Push ELEVENSIX would be sick.

    You could still ramp up the LSC one one setting for the climbs and then have it super plush/sensitive for the downhills. Where I live, our trails are all climb climb climb then a mosnter descent back to the car.

  17. #17
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    I still have a Banshee Wildcard frame with a Fox DHX-5 Coil shock (200/57mm). Some weeks ago I have installed the shock on my Spitfire, as it fits - just for the fun and to see how it works ...

    The Fox has no adjustable HSC/LSC, but an adjustable Bottom-Out, Propedal and Rebound. Perhaps a happy coincidence, but the spring-rate fits good and overall the difference between the coil Fox and the CCDB-Air is a even more slightly better small-bump-sensitivity with the Fox. Apart from that no real noticeable big difference, as I have spend much effort to get the CCDB dialed in and I generally avoid Propedal on both shock and fork - simply not necessary with the KS-Link ...

    So if your budged allows and you donīt mind the weight go for it!

  18. #18
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    I've come from a V1 to a V2 Spitfire, with Revelations too.

    As Keith has stated, the leverage curves are noticably different.
    The same drivetrain is now on the V2.
    The V1 pedalled amazing in the 36tooth chainring, better than the V2.
    Saying that, the V2 does pedal better in the granny ring and through rough terrain.
    Both due to the reduced chain forces interacting less with the suspension.
    I do kinda miss the better pedalling but I'm happy to make the compromise for when it gets really steep.

    The V2 is miles stiffer laterally than the old bike.
    I could see the swingarm moving when I yanked the rear wheel side to side (same wheels too) whereas there's no movement on the V2.

    The longer front end is great for both ascending and descending.
    Not as twitchy at speed.

    Despite the frameset being heavier, I have not noticed it.

    It does depend what terrain you ride on.
    My riding was starting to get more steep and aggressive and with the V2 I have picked up a noticeable amount of speed.
    The Revelation was OK, it's a tad short for the frame but I did not want to steepen the head angle to reduce the pedal strike.
    I fixed it by installing a Pike instead.
    A much more suitable fork for my needs.

    I'm so happy that I made the move to the V2.
    It's exactly what I was wanting to improve on the V1.
    Even has a bottle cage mount even though it's in a less than ideal place.

    You can build one for your needs, from light trail (Fox Float and that Revelation), or burly (like me with a CC DBAir and Pike).
    You won't be dissapointed.

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