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  1. #1
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    Rune V2 fork choice - travel adjust or not?

    Hey folks, building a rune for my one and only bike this season. I'll use it for mostly XC rides, in this case XC meaning that I park my car in one place, pedal around a loop of climbing and descending, then end up back at my car. Generally only like 1-2 hours of climbing per ride, but also the occasional longer ride with a good 2.5-3.5k of vert. My question is, do I want a talas or float?

    Seems to me like talas is a no brainer at first to get in a more comfy climbing position, but the float is lighter, supposedly more supple (confirmation of this? haven't ridden either in years), and based on some reviews around here the V2 climbs pretty well with the fork in full travel considering the angles.

    Looking for input on how the Rune v2 climbs in full travel vs. lowered travel and also input on how much better the Float really feels compared to the Talas.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by ironxcross View Post
    Hey folks, building a rune for my one and only bike this season. I'll use it for mostly XC rides, in this case XC meaning that I park my car in one place, pedal around a loop of climbing and descending, then end up back at my car. Generally only like 1-2 hours of climbing per ride, but also the occasional longer ride with a good 2.5-3.5k of vert. My question is, do I want a talas or float?

    Seems to me like talas is a no brainer at first to get in a more comfy climbing position, but the float is lighter, supposedly more supple (confirmation of this? haven't ridden either in years), and based on some reviews around here the V2 climbs pretty well with the fork in full travel considering the angles.

    Looking for input on how the Rune v2 climbs in full travel vs. lowered travel and also input on how much better the Float really feels compared to the Talas.

    Thanks!
    I run a 170mm Rockshox Lyrik RC2DH and I have no problem climbing aboard the V2. I used to own a Talas and to be honest never used it (this one on another bike). I have also owned a Float and it was more supple. But like most Fox Forks the Talas and the Float did not use all of its travel even on large hits where another fork would have. To be honest if I was looking at a fork for my Rune I would shy away from fox and look at a RS Lyrik RC2DH air/coil or an X fusion vengeance. Both of these forks have far superior damping performance compared to fox.

  3. #3
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    Or a 2010 or newer 55 RC3 Evo Ti.

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    Oh, long story short I can get a deal on RS, Fox, or Xfusion, but the deal on the Fox is the cheapest. The factors that led me to Fox were price, weight, matching the float ctd I'll have in back (not crucial, but something to tip the scales when on the fence), and 27.5 specific (again really not a big factor to me, but another little thing to tip the scales).

    Still not totally set on the fork choice and tempted by the lyrik or vengeance, but for now I'm not looking to spark a debate between forks. My big question is how the rune climbs with a fork at its full travel. My concern is that I'll get the talas, but end up never using the travel adjust and wishing I didn't waste money, weight, and performance on it... Is the talas really that much worse feeling downhill?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ironxcross View Post
    Oh, long story short I can get a deal on RS, Fox, or Xfusion, but the deal on the Fox is the cheapest. The factors that led me to Fox were price, weight, matching the float ctd I'll have in back (not crucial, but something to tip the scales when on the fence), and 27.5 specific (again really not a big factor to me, but another little thing to tip the scales).

    Still not totally set on the fork choice and tempted by the lyrik or vengeance, but for now I'm not looking to spark a debate between forks. My big question is how the rune climbs with a fork at its full travel. My concern is that I'll get the talas, but end up never using the travel adjust and wishing I didn't waste money, weight, and performance on it... Is the talas really that much worse feeling downhill?
    You might want to consider the Vengeance over the Fox even if the Fox is a little cheaper just for future proofing if you want to try 650b in the future. The Vengance will run 26 or 650b wheels.

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    Whoops forgot to say, I'm going 650b to begin with. So I was saying that it's nice the fox is 27.5 specific so it will have ample tire clearance and the offset specific to 650b wheels.

    Again, really just looking for a) how the rune v2 climbs with a 160/170mm fork at full travel and b) any real life comparison between the float and talas performance

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    I was thinking of the same fork as well. I have the 34 Fox Float on my 29er. Wondering how stiff the 650b version will feel with 160mm of travel.

    Quote Originally Posted by ironxcross View Post
    Whoops forgot to say, I'm going 650b to begin with. So I was saying that it's nice the fox is 27.5 specific so it will have ample tire clearance and the offset specific to 650b wheels.

    Again, really just looking for a) how the rune v2 climbs with a 160/170mm fork at full travel and b) any real life comparison between the float and talas performance
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    Sorry, forgot to mention how I feel about the Talus option. I used to swear by it, but its been at least 4 years since having that option. I do a lot of long fire road climbs and for me, I'm more comfortable with a neutral riding position as long as I get full leg extension. Having a Reverb and shock lockout makes everything nice!
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    Any more input on this? Leaning towards float right now, mostly just for the "less think, more ride" philosophy. The weight and money savings don't hurt either.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ironxcross View Post
    Whoops forgot to say, I'm going 650b to begin with. So I was saying that it's nice the fox is 27.5 specific so it will have ample tire clearance and the offset specific to 650b wheels.

    Again, really just looking for a) how the rune v2 climbs with a 160/170mm fork at full travel and b) any real life comparison between the float and talas performance
    OK, so I just took delivery of my Rune v2 with a Fox 34 Float 160 (NOT a TALAS) and 650b wheelset. I came from riding a 2003 Gary Fisher Sugar 4+ with an upgraded 120mm front fork, and I too normally ride more trail/XC rather than true AM. Rode a trail I was familiar with today, and there were two short, punchy climbs that were no problem on my Fisher, which has taller gearing but might be ~1lb lighter. I nearly wheelied and had to come off the bike both times.

    I might chalk that up to getting used to the bike, but I thought for an instant that I should have paid the extra money and gone with the TALAS. I'll reserve judgement though until I have a couple other local trails under my belt.

    The riding position is much more upright than my Fisher, and feels more compact. I may slide my saddle back to the limit to stretch it out a little and maybe allow me to get a little lower over the bars for steeps. That sucks, though, because I live at around 7,000 feet and most of my riding is above that, so the more I have to tuck in the climb the more wheezy I get.

    I have to say -- it's an awesome bike, though. I figure I'll get used to it, and so far the 1/2 lb of weight savings over the TALAS has been worth it, but I'd say if you ride long, really steep climbs with a lot of switchbacks, it might be worth the TALAS option.

  11. #11
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    The longer the reach on a bike, the more your weight is shifter forwards, which helps on a climb. XC bikes tend to have long reach to help on long and steep climbs... however long reach is generally dertimental on descents. So if you feel you are already cramped and don't want a larger frame, then you may want to consider the options of running a slightly longer stem and / or wider bars to help bring your weight forwards a bit for climbs and to get rid of the cramped feeling if you are concerned by it. But before you do this I suggest you ride the bike more and play around with shifting your weight around, as this may not be necessary once you have got used to your new ride.

    Switching bikes always take a bit of adjustment, and if coming from an XC bike to a proper all mountain bike then that is a significant change, and will take some getting used to. A rider shouldn't ride in a static position on a bike, when going up they should shift weight forwards, and when going down they should shift weight backwards. This is essential to maintain good weight distribution.
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    Never ridden a rune, but at times I wish that I had travel adjust on my wildcard. With the 180mm fork its a pain to climb. My hardtail has a u-turn pike, and I do use the travel adjust on it for days that I have a lot of climbing.

    I think that this question always comes down to the rider. Are you the type that actually would stop and adjust your travel for the ascent and change it for the descent? If so, then go for it. If you're not gonna stop and spend the 15 seconds to change the height because that takes too much time or is a bother, then don't get it.
    Just another redneck with a bike

  13. #13
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    I currently have a 36 Talas on my Rune and never use travel adjust. In all honesty i'd sacrifice the travel adjust for a fork that works properly...hence why i'll be punting the Fox and buying a Lyric, 55 or Vengeance in the near future. Damping on the Talas is pants.

  14. #14
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    What year/damper is your fox?? I went with a 2013 float 36 and love it so far. Definitely don't feel the need for travel adjust, and have been pretty pleased with the rc2 damper so far.

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    Admittedly it is an old fork, probably 2007, though i did just come off a 2010 Float which was more supple yet also didn't offer enough support. I had to run both forks very hard to stop the diving, sacrificing small bump sensitivity in the process.

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    Ok, I'd recommend giving a 2013 a shot (not 2012 with the rlc) if you get a chance. It's definitely still not mind blowing like my boxer w/avalanche was, but it's pretty damn nice. I'd agree that I have to sacrifice a little small bump compliance at low speeds, but the way I have it set up now it has tons of support in berms and popping off jumps, but still tracks super well and absorbs everything once I get going fast. I do very badly want to try a vengeance, I probably would have pulled the trigger on one purely based on reputation, but the float was the only option I liked that was readily available at the time and I wanted to hit the trail.

    For anyone reading this though, in response to my original post I say don't bother with travel adjust on the rune. You can set it up to climb comfortably at full travel no problem!

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    Quote Originally Posted by builttoride View Post
    The longer the reach on a bike, the more your weight is shifter forwards, which helps on a climb. XC bikes tend to have long reach to help on long and steep climbs... however long reach is generally dertimental on descents. So if you feel you are already cramped and don't want a larger frame, then you may want to consider the options of running a slightly longer stem and / or wider bars to help bring your weight forwards a bit for climbs and to get rid of the cramped feeling if you are concerned by it. But before you do this I suggest you ride the bike more and play around with shifting your weight around, as this may not be necessary once you have got used to your new ride.

    Switching bikes always take a bit of adjustment, and if coming from an XC bike to a proper all mountain bike then that is a significant change, and will take some getting used to. A rider shouldn't ride in a static position on a bike, when going up they should shift weight forwards, and when going down they should shift weight backwards. This is essential to maintain good weight distribution.
    Thanks Keith -- I'm definitely still getting used to the bike and the different riding position, and I've told myself I need to re-train my brain a bit for it. I also need to burn off my winter backcountry survival fat. :-)

    I do have some easy changes I can make before I start swapping components -- I can eliminate some spacers under my stem, for one. I currently run a 60mm/10deg stem, and I like the quick steering compared to my old XC rig...I just feel like I need to get a little lower over the front end and still be able to breathe when I'm shifted forward for climbs.

    Any thoughts on swapping the chips in the dropout for the steeper geometry?

    You have built a killer bike -- it's super-active compared to my old Fisher Sugar, and rides way lighter. It feels like it jumps itself and inspires way more confidence. Golf clap to you, Sir.

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    Eliminating spacers under the stam is something I should have added, as that does indeed have a big effect.

    changing to a higher / steeper position in with the flip chips will help shift your seight forwards slightly which will help on climbs. I chose to offer this adjustibility so that different styles of riders could fine tune the bike more to their liking, as every rider is different and has different preferances. So have a go with different chip positions, and shock sags to find what feels right to you.... but remeber to have fun while doing it!
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ironxcross View Post
    Ok, I'd recommend giving a 2013 a shot (not 2012 with the rlc) if you get a chance. It's definitely still not mind blowing like my boxer w/avalanche was, but it's pretty damn nice. I'd agree that I have to sacrifice a little small bump compliance at low speeds, but the way I have it set up now it has tons of support in berms and popping off jumps, but still tracks super well and absorbs everything once I get going fast. I do very badly want to try a vengeance, I probably would have pulled the trigger on one purely based on reputation, but the float was the only option I liked that was readily available at the time and I wanted to hit the trail.

    For anyone reading this though, in response to my original post I say don't bother with travel adjust on the rune. You can set it up to climb comfortably at full travel no problem!
    Thats good to know...cheers for the info mate! I always liked the damping on my old Boxxer, did a great job keeping the front up in the rough. Will see if i can get a blast on a new Fox though...

    I guess another thing that frustrates me about Fox is the stanchions wearing out, I do maintain the forks but have never really had similar problems with other fork manufacturers.

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    This bike climbs just fine.....fantastic actually in the slack setting without a travel adjust fork.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spooky221 View Post
    Thats good to know...cheers for the info mate! I always liked the damping on my old Boxxer, did a great job keeping the front up in the rough. Will see if i can get a blast on a new Fox though...

    I guess another thing that frustrates me about Fox is the stanchions wearing out, I do maintain the forks but have never really had similar problems with other fork manufacturers.
    No problem. Although after another ride yesterday I'm thinking with the fox I really do have to sacrifice how it rides at low speeds. It rides perfect going fast, doesn't dive and when there are unavoidable big obstacles it soaks them up super well, but riding slow (climbing) over slow bumps it feels really stiff. It might also need some breaking in though I've only put maybe 6 short rides on it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by builttoride View Post
    ... find what feels right to you.... but remeber to have fun while doing it!
    Damn straight.

    13+ miles for me coming up this Sunday, 6 or so in the saddle on a good climb. Lots of time to get acquainted!

    Thanks for the tips!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stabone33 View Post
    Damn straight.

    13+ miles for me coming up this Sunday, 6 or so in the saddle on a good climb. Lots of time to get acquainted!

    Thanks for the tips!
    Removing head tube spacers (actually...putting the stem under the spacers till I can trim the fork) did the trick. The Banshee is amazing, climbed like a goat.

    I hereby retract any previous buyer's remorse about the non-travel-adjust Float fork. I even left it in Descend mode while climbing over the rougher stuff and the bike and fork were like buttah. No TALAS necessary.

    Too bad Fox isn't making a 160mm fork for 650B in 2014...can't see getting a 150mm front for a 160mm rear travel bike. Oh well...I got mine!

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