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  1. #1601
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    Yeah, Large Prime would be just a tad too small for someone of our height IMHO, but the Large Phantom with 10mm more Reach works just fine for me with a 65mm stem and 785mm bar, although wouldn't mind giving an XL a try, but would need to run a <40mm stem.
    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    @ 6'2" on a Large Prime I have always felt like the bike was too small for me. Often found my body position was out over the front of the bike too often. Even w/ a setback post and 70mm stem, I felt the need to hunch over to get into a position I liked.

    I just found a XL frame and hope it will help to put me back on the bike a little more, in a more neutral position.

    That being said, my Large Raw 2013 frame will be going up for sale.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  2. #1602
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    I need to disagree.
    When spacer is on DS than i moves crank to right and this is the only way to change the chainline. Placing spacer on NDS only moves left crankarm to the left but it does not have an influence on chainline.

    Quote Originally Posted by MalcolmX View Post
    yeah... you can try it both ways and see which chainline you like better -spacer to the left means better chainline for climbing, chainline to the right means better chainline for the smaller cogs...

    and, when you go for the "climbing chainline", there won`t be space for an ISCG chainguide...

    My dropout is 142x12.Spindle 120mm, BB 73mm
    Placing the spacer on NDS might move left crank arm to left so in result change the rider legs position (2,5mm wider) .
    Without any spacer my chainline was ~52,5-53mm - should be correct..
    I observed one more thing - when no spacer at all , than the left arm covers fully spindle, but with spacer on DS or NDS than left arem hides back of about 2,5mm - don't know if this if both situations are correct.

    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    What drop out option did you go for Placek? If you did 150x12, then set it up as Shimano says, if you went 143x12 or 153x10, then maybe play around with running the spacer on the NDS. Personally I've done this before on another bike for the exact same reason and it does make a difference, but on my Prime and Phantom, I've had no need since I first ran an 135 SS hub with 6 cogs and now a 150x12 hub with full cassette. With the spacer on the DS, the crank should be centre to the frame (to check just rotate the cranks and measure the space between them and chainstay) if you run it on the NDS, the DS crank will be 2.5mm close to the DS chanistay and the NDS will be 2.5mm further a way from the NDS chainstay. Up to you if that bit of difference is something you can feel.

  3. #1603
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    Dude, have to very adamantly tell you you're doing something wrong, simple as that if you DS crank does not move over if you put the 2.5mm spacer on the NDS - SERIOUSLY. Try giving the crank arm a whack with a soft hammer and see if that helps. The spindle goes "X" way into the BB, doesn't matter how many spacers go where, the crank will always go "X" distance into the cup/bearing, so if you move the spacer from the DS to the NDS, it follows that the crank and hence chainline will also move.

    Quote Originally Posted by Placek View Post
    I need to disagree.
    When spacer is on DS than i moves crank to right and this is the only way to change the chainline. Placing spacer on NDS only moves left crankarm to the left but it does not have an influence on chainline.




    My dropout is 142x12.Spindle 120mm, BB 73mm
    Placing the spacer on NDS might move left crank arm to left so in result change the rider legs position (2,5mm wider) .
    Without any spacer my chainline was ~52,5-53mm - should be correct..
    I observed one more thing - when no spacer at all , than the left arm covers fully spindle, but with spacer on DS or NDS than left arem hides back of about 2,5mm - don't know if this if both situations are correct.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  4. #1604
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    LyNx
    Imagine 2 situations :

    1.
    there are no spacers and BB is tightened.
    Next You take off DS BB cup and put the spacer - obviously right arm on DS move 2,5mm to right and chainline(distance between chain and frame) moves the same (increase about 2,5mm.

    2.
    there are no spacers and BB is tightened.
    Next You take off NDS BB cup and put the spacer - obviously left arm on NDS move 2,5mm to left but chainline (distance between chain and frame) stays the same as right cup and tightened right arm haven't been impacted . It happens like that because 2 BB cups cam move independently.


    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    Dude, have to very adamantly tell you you're doing something wrong, simple as that if you DS crank does not move over if you put the 2.5mm spacer on the NDS - SERIOUSLY. Try giving the crank arm a whack with a soft hammer and see if that helps. The spindle goes "X" way into the BB, doesn't matter how many spacers go where, the crank will always go "X" distance into the cup/bearing, so if you move the spacer from the DS to the NDS, it follows that the crank and hence chainline will also move.

  5. #1605
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    I'm with LyNx on this one.
    Why are you tightening up BB with no spacers to start with? It needs to be installed with either spacer on left or spacer on right... no option to install and tighten up with no spacers at all.

    Or am I missing something? My head hurts....

    Quote Originally Posted by Placek View Post
    LyNx
    Imagine 2 situations :

    1.
    there are no spacers and BB is tightened.
    Next You take off DS BB cup and put the spacer - obviously right arm on DS move 2,5mm to right and chainline(distance between chain and frame) moves the same (increase about 2,5mm.

    2.
    there are no spacers and BB is tightened.
    Next You take off NDS BB cup and put the spacer - obviously left arm on NDS move 2,5mm to left but chainline (distance between chain and frame) stays the same as right cup and tightened right arm haven't been impacted . It happens like that because 2 BB cups cam move independently.

  6. #1606
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    Starting with no spacer as Prime without any has 53mm chainline (considered as best for MTB) and all parts fits tight.



    Quote Originally Posted by russmu66 View Post
    I'm with LyNx on this one.
    Why are you tightening up BB with no spacers to start with? It needs to be installed with either spacer on left or spacer on right... no option to install and tighten up with no spacers at all.

    Or am I missing something? My head hurts....

  7. #1607
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    Placek, Shimano says you NEED (1) 2.5mm spacer for a 73mm bb.

    If you wan to keep the chainline of 53mm, you must use the 2.5mm spacer on the NDS. Leaving it out will mean bearings will be contacting areas of the crank spindle they should not.

  8. #1608
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    OK, so what you're saying is you can use NO SPACERS and install the cups and get the pre-load to tighten down properly to stop the cranks from moving left to right, is this right? This is what it seems you're saying, if so, no worries, I myself have done this before, but it is hit or miss depending on the tolerances of the frame. Sometimes the pre-load cap worked as it should, but sometimes I just had to use a thread rod for the pre-load as the end of the spindle would come just a tad too far through the NDS crank arm (i.e. butted), but the threaded rod gave proper pre-load and then I just left it without the pre-load cap. Onlyt problem with doing it this way is that if by chance anything happens on the trail and you need to remove your crank, say bent chainring, stuck chain, etc, you can't pre-load it properly when re-installing, unless you have the threaded rod with you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Placek View Post
    Starting with no spacer as Prime without any has 53mm chainline (considered as best for MTB) and all parts fits tight.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  9. #1609
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    Exactly.
    I noticed that frame is hand made and miss 0,5mm here or there but every measurement need to have some base so i started with BB shell width and that one has true 73mm.


    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    OK, so what you're saying is you can use NO SPACERS and install the cups and get the pre-load to tighten down properly to stop the cranks from moving left to right, is this right? This is what it seems you're saying, if so, no worries, I myself have done this before, but it is hit or miss depending on the tolerances of the frame.

    I don't fully understand below (with threaded rod) but my today's measurements whows as below:

    NO SPACERS - is fully possible and there is no spindle movement in BB nor spindle is too long.
    1 (and only one)SPACER on DS (between shell and BB cup) moves right crank arm to right and change the chainline forward to small cogs
    1 (and only one)SPACER on NDS (between shell and BB cup) moves left crank arm to left and does not influence the chainline (right arm stays tight to BB cup). Why it's happening - because BB is no one piece but two independent cups and spacering any of them impacts only the arm on that particular side.

    So in the end i thought - maybe my spindle is not fully centered (rider weight not balanced the same to L and R) and because of that i need some spacer.
    Well rthe difference is 0,7mm (NO SPACER at all) so this won't hurt - moreover i'm not able to correct that by 2,5mm spacer



    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    Sometimes the pre-load cap worked as it should, but sometimes I just had to use a thread rod for the pre-load as the end of the spindle would come just a tad too far through the NDS crank arm (i.e. butted), but the threaded rod gave proper pre-load and then I just left it without the pre-load cap. Onlyt problem with doing it this way is that if by chance anything happens on the trail and you need to remove your crank, say bent chainring, stuck chain, etc, you can't pre-load it properly when re-installing, unless you have the threaded rod with you.

  10. #1610
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    Recieved my "new to me" XL prime frame yesterday. Other than the fact the frame was dirty, there were bad bearings for the lower linkage, and the seller took it upon himself to attempt to fix small dents in the lower linkage by grinding it (he told me about the marks, but not about his "attempt" to fix them), it looks the same as my Large.

    Is is really that hard to be honest?

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  11. #1611
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    Hung all the stuff from my Large onto the XL frame and hammered out 15 miles last night. I really felt a lot better on the XL. Felt a bit more "in" the bike, instead of over the front of it.

    100% happy with my choice.

  12. #1612
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    What stem you running on the XL? Glad you got it sorted.

    Yeah on the honesty part, really sucks when people just can't tell the truth. Not sure exactly what that person thought they were doing by grinding that down. Did you ask if they were over or short shocking it to cause that?

    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    Hung all the stuff from my Large onto the XL frame and hammered out 15 miles last night. I really felt a lot better on the XL. Felt a bit more "in" the bike, instead of over the front of it.

    100% happy with my choice.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  13. #1613
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    What stem you running on the XL?
    70mm, same as my Large!

    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    Yeah on the honesty part, really sucks when people just can't tell the truth. Not sure exactly what that person thought they were doing by grinding that down. Did you ask if they were over or short shocking it to cause that?
    He said the front der hit it, so I am guessing he must have folded it back in order to do that, as the marks are on the nds.

  14. #1614
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    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-012.jpg

  15. #1615
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    Hung all the stuff from my Large onto the XL frame and hammered out 15 miles last night. I really felt a lot better on the XL. Felt a bit more "in" the bike, instead of over the front of it.

    100% happy with my choice.
    Glad it worked out for ya. I'm 6'2", somewhat long of torso and the XL is perfect. I've got room to move around and hunker down on fast corners. The XL Prime is really secure at speed too. It's never let me down or scared me at speed, although I keep wondering where the limit is and holding back to keep from finding it.

  16. #1616
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    Not sure exactly what that person thought they were doing by grinding that down.
    Minimizing the risk of metal fatigue. It's a very good idea to grind down dents, so he (?) knew what he was doing.

  17. #1617
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    So, you've had some time now to get in a few rides, give us some feedback on what you feel/find different between the two sizes. Eaxact same parts just transfered over right?
    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
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    Yeah, I guess if he had a dent that could be it, could also have been trying to modify it for some unbeknownst reason I modified my vertical brace on my PP Prime to ease FD clearance.
    Quote Originally Posted by Makten View Post
    Minimizing the risk of metal fatigue. It's a very good idea to grind down dents, so he (?) knew what he was doing.
    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    Not sure exactly what that person thought they were doing by grinding that down. Did you ask if they were over or short shocking it to cause that?
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  18. #1618
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    So, you've had some time now to get in a few rides, give us some feedback on what you feel/find different between the two sizes. Eaxact same parts just transfered over right?
    Well, I am pretty sure my CCDB coil is in need of service, so the bike is down for the moment. But I did get a couple of rides in, and found that for me the XL is more playfull than the Large. That seems odd based on the wheelbase, but I was def more out on the front of the Large bike, and felt more "on top" compared to the XL. I am able to bunny hop and negotiate jumps better, and also feel more confident on down hill features and banked corners, as before I felt too far out front.

    I would sometimes get lower back pain, and part of the reason for going to an XL was to get me a little more stretched out, as I did feel a little cramped on the Large. This thing is a long beast though! I made bike racks in the garage and basement for my bikes, and needed to modify them because this is by far the longest bike I have ever owned.

    I will be stoked to get my CCDB back from service, which I was interested to find should have been serviced at the 100hr ish mark. Every 100 hrs they want $150 worth of service....eiyy yeiii yeiii.

  19. #1619
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    Yeah, seems kind of weird that the bigger bike would feel more playful, but as they always say - if a bike fits... and if you weren't comfortable on the Large, then you wouldn't push it as easily. I like my XL PP Prime good enough, but always felt a bit too big for me, never seemed to be able to get my weight on the front for fast cornering stuff, that's why I went for the Large Phantom and I'm really comfortable on it, but do wonder how the XL would be.

    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    Well, I am pretty sure my CCDB coil is in need of service, so the bike is down for the moment. But I did get a couple of rides in, and found that for me the XL is more playfull than the Large. That seems odd based on the wheelbase, but I was def more out on the front of the Large bike, and felt more "on top" compared to the XL. I am able to bunny hop and negotiate jumps better, and also feel more confident on down hill features and banked corners, as before I felt too far out front.

    I would sometimes get lower back pain, and part of the reason for going to an XL was to get me a little more stretched out, as I did feel a little cramped on the Large. This thing is a long beast though! I made bike racks in the garage and basement for my bikes, and needed to modify them because this is by far the longest bike I have ever owned.

    I will be stoked to get my CCDB back from service, which I was interested to find should have been serviced at the 100hr ish mark. Every 100 hrs they want $150 worth of service....eiyy yeiii yeiii.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  20. #1620
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    but do wonder how the XL would be.
    Do it!!

  21. #1621
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    Would love to, but don't have the funds and am quite happy on the Large TBH. Reason I switched is because the XL PP Prime is 472mm Reach and the Large was only 440mm so went XL, but since I felt a bit stretched on the XL Prime with a 65mm stem, I figured on the Large Phantom with a 450mm Reach (10mm longer than the L Prime) and same cockpit I should be good and I am. The curiosity is just to see what it'd feel like to ride a bike with a 40-50mm stem and I'll get to do just that when I build back up the XL Prime.

    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    Do it!!
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  22. #1622
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    Dude, have to very adamantly tell you you're doing something wrong, simple as that if you DS crank does not move over if you put the 2.5mm spacer on the NDS - SERIOUSLY. Try giving the crank arm a whack with a soft hammer and see if that helps. The spindle goes "X" way into the BB, doesn't matter how many spacers go where, the crank will always go "X" distance into the cup/bearing, so if you move the spacer from the DS to the NDS, it follows that the crank and hence chainline will also move.
    After some tests i giving the honor back.

    At first tightened cranks seemed nit to move but when i did that for 3rd time it appeared that without ANY spacer spindle has some very little movement left-right.
    Is like ultra small BUP but niticeable when holding arm.
    So i went with one spacer o DS and all is quiet.
    So end to end one spacer and up to rider on which side.
    Thank You all, knew that Your expirence will finally benefit.

  23. #1623
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    Rear Shock Tuning - CCDBa CS XV

    So,
    I think I've got my shock settings to where I like them. Finally!

    For a frame of reference I'm 6'6", 245ish in gear and ride everything (ha, see what I did there!) from XC to bike park on my XL Prime. I can finesse my lines but, really, I just like to point and shoot while riding.
    The shock I'm running is the CCDBAir CS XV can.

    I had a brain wave about 2 weeks ago which helped me get to the settings I now have on the shock. I've always thought the base tune settings for the CCDBaCS listed on the Cane Creek and Banshee sites to be too firm overall for my liking. I'm curious to know where Banshee and Cane Creek came up with the base tune. When figuring out the base tune was the feedback from riders that lean to only a certain style of riding?

    The brain wave I had was 'Why not put the Climb Switch to WORK!'. What I mean by that is why not have a more overall supple/softer setting and use the CS to firm things up for certain trails or aspects of riding.
    I dialed the compression settings back. Especially the LSC. As well as the rebound settings. But not that much on rebound.

    Here's the base tune as listed for the Prime:
    HSC - 2
    LSC - 14
    HSR - 2
    LSR - 14

    Now here's my settings:
    HSC - 1.6
    LSC - 5
    HSR - 1.75
    LSR - 10
    Spring Rate - 180psi

    With these settings I have a substantially more supple ride over high speed chatter and still have enough for big hits.
    If you have been following my musings on my bike from earlier in this thread you'll know that I found that my feet were either being chattered around on the pedals or being bounced up off of them (I ride flats on my Prime). Now my feet stay firmly on the pedals regardless of what is happening to the bike. A case in point recently was I hit a very large square edged bump at high speed and the back end soaked it up with a minor bottom out and my feet stayed on the pedals. Whereas previously on similar bumps my feet were being bounced up off the pedals. Luckily my feet always came back down to the pedals.

    As for putting the Climb Switch to work, what I'm doing now is using it more often rather than just on and off for the climb up and the ride down.
    If it is a straight up smooth climb I'll flip the CS to fully on. If it's a straight up climb but technical I'll flip the CS to half on. If the trail is undulating and tech but still going up I'll put the CS to about 1/3 on.
    With using the CS like this I find the ride much better going up because the bike doesn't get hung up as much or sit too deep in the stroke.
    My climbing style is to sit and spin or grind it out. I rarely stand up to pedal uphill. What I've noticed from my style of climbing in relation to how the KS suspension works is that I don't find it firms up as much as other people say it does. I really only notice the suspension firming up when I stand up and mash the pedals going uphill.

    The other times that I've put the CS to use for other than climbing was on a trip to Whitehorse, YT recently.
    In the Whitehorse region trails are quite buff and sandy/gravelly/loose with mellow and undulating climbs and descents. At least in the Grey Mtn and Yukon River Trail area.
    While riding there I had the CS flipped to about 1/4 on to keep the bike feeling peppy for pumping and working the trail both up and down.
    I did have the CS completely off for any sustained downhill trails.

    There really isn't any kind of buff/smooth type trail in the Sea To Sky region so I don't think I'll be riding trails here with the CS on other than for climbing.



    And, it wouldn't be a RideEverything post without some riding pics!
    These are from our trip to Whitehorse, YT a couple of weeks ago. It was our 10 year anniversary trip! Our first date was mountain biking so it seemed appropriate that this anniversary should be celebrated by involving bikes.

    We booked with Borealé Mountain Biking for an all-inclusive package.
    I highly recommend them if you're looking to ride in the Yukon! It is a husband and wife team that run the operation.
    The riding, guiding, food, accommodation and people were fantastic!!
    Another thing that was cool was that while we were there it was just a few days before the Summer solstice so it was light for 24 hours. The sun dipped below the horizon for only about 4 hours a night but it stayed twilight during that time. It never got dark.

    Yukon River Trail
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-p6160012.jpg

    Yukon River Trail
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-p6160023.jpg

    Lake Bennett from McDonald Creek Trail
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-p6170042.jpg

    Wayne's World
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-p6170044.jpg

    Upper Wolverine
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-p6170053.jpg

    Lower Wolverine
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-p6180111.jpg

    Mossy
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-p6180117.jpg

    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-p6180120.jpg

    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-p6180145.jpg

  24. #1624
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    All I can say is wow! Amazing pics as usual!

  25. #1625
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    Hi Banshee freaks.

    My new Prime is almost set and as usual some questions appear.
    My Pike 150 RCT3 and CC Inline are on the way but have heard some rumors that in some specific cases those parts require initial service for brand new items?
    Should i dig in this topic or just put all together and enjoy?

  26. #1626
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    Quote Originally Posted by Placek View Post
    just put all together and enjoy?

    ride

  27. #1627
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    Well, my CCDB coil just got back from service, and I am REALLY stoked to be able to ride a FS again. Between my fat bike w/ 4.8" tires (which helped me podium in a race last wknd) and my rigid SS Karate Monkey, I am 100% for some pillow-esk rides.

    But in my haste, I forgot to document the settings on the shock...what a dumbF#@*

  28. #1628
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    Just curious, anyone have an orange Prime? I've never seen a red or orange Prime. I have doubts that any red ones were produced, and now I'm wondering about orange. It doesn't appear they are selling many Primes, and I am tempted to buy an orange frame and stash it, or do a 2nd build.

  29. #1629
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    I think I saw a red on posted here a while back (maybe even in this thread). Never seen an orange - would like too though.

    I am still partial to the flo yellow that I had on my old Prime. Great color!

  30. #1630
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    Red was a 2014 color, orange is a 2015 color. Very few Primes made it to the US for 2015.
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  31. #1631
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtMerchantBicycles View Post
    Red was a 2014 color, orange is a 2015 color. Very few Primes made it to the US for 2015.
    Because Phantom<Prime?

  32. #1632
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    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-18944718530_d7cd9596f0_b.jpg

    I might end up getting a 150mm rear end for a stiffer rear wheel setup.

  33. #1633
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    Do it, you'll be amazed at the difference it will make, especially if you're a bigger person. Also if you're doing that, then make sure your rims have an ID of at 29-35mm to really add to the stiffness and feel what it's like to run low pressures without tyre squirm.
    Quote Originally Posted by caRpetbomBer View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I might end up getting a 150mm rear end for a stiffer rear wheel setup.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  34. #1634
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    Yeah for sure im looking at a dishless Hope 2 evo with a Light Bicycle 38mm rim.

  35. #1635
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    Running carbon rims makes a way bigger difference than hub width, I used to run a 150 with Stan's flow and my 142 with Derby carbon is miles stiffer.
    Wouldn't recommend hopes to a bigger guy, they don't last well, had EVO 2's myself, the bearings lasted 6 weeks before disintegration (the replacement Enduro bearings will last though) and I cracked 2 alloy freehub bodies in one summer - now run I9 on all my bikes, the durability and faster engagement are worth it.

  36. #1636
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    Quote Originally Posted by caRpetbomBer View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I might end up getting a 150mm rear end for a stiffer rear wheel setup.
    So orange Primes DO exist! Looks wild!

    And yes 150 is the way to go on these bikes IMO. The entire rear of my Prime feels like a brick shithouse.

  37. #1637
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    Guys

    A simple question reg CC Inline - between LCS and LSR there is one more hole with no screw inside , do You know if that is proper setup?

    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-1.jpg

  38. #1638
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    My XL PP Prime has been sitting stripped down since I got my Phantom with the intent to actually have it stripped and re-finished, sadly in the nearly 1.5 years I've had the Phantom haven't gotten around to it, so decided to at least strip the clear coat of and get it ready. After doing that and having enough parts laying around (actually stole them off the Paradox) I decided to build it back up as funds are a bit tight right now and wanted to try it with a 45mm stem and compare to my Large Phantom with a 65mm stem. I actually liked it a lot on the 3, very different rides I took it on with this setup, never found the WB too long, made everything I wanted to, even the really tight stuff, found the little extra WB length made stalling/track standing the bike easier in slow tech situations.

    Love the matte/Lustre finish, just put some polish o it to stop it from tarnishing too easily, am thinking about just getting some new decals and calling it good, but haven't made a final decision yet.

    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-dsc_0021.jpg
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  39. #1639
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    I was wondering if any of you put the Rune 27.5 dropouts and ran regular 29er tires with them? I was wondering if you could feel any difference with the extra .4" as far as stability goes? I doubt it's worth the $100, but interesting to see what you guys think. Too bad my Pike fork won't fit 29+ tires, cause then it would be a no brainer to pick up the 27.5 dropout for riding the sandy moto/bike trails.
    195 lbs-6'4" Banshee Prime XL
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  40. #1640
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    any ideas about my above question ? should i go directly to CC website ?

  41. #1641
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    Quote Originally Posted by Placek View Post
    Guys

    A simple question reg CC Inline - between LCS and LSR there is one more hole with no screw inside , do You know if that is proper setup?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    My CCDB Inline looks different than your pic, it doesn't have that hole or star bolt next to the climb lever. That must just be a running production change. LSC should be adjusted with the allen head within the climb lever. You can hold the lever when making LSC changes to keep it from moving.

    In my experience, Cane Creek is good about answering the phone and responding to inquiries, so I wouldn't hesitate to contact them.

  42. #1642
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    So this happened tonight

  43. #1643
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    Sweet Dang that is bright, you need one of the new Bontrager Rally orange helmets to go with it
    Quote Originally Posted by daniel.swattridge View Post


    So this happened tonight
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  44. #1644
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    Quote Originally Posted by daniel.swattridge View Post


    So this happened tonight
    Holy Toledo that's bright! Nice bike!

  45. #1645
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    Ill take more photos once I have finished. Still need to do alot of fiddly bits

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    Daylight photo. Finished it off this morning. Now to save for some carbon wheels. Orange glows

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    Sweet ride!

  48. #1648
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    Are those 2.1s? LOL

  49. #1649
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    Ok i wrote CC and it looks i miss dust cover. Hope my LBS will manage to get some.

    Guys i do have some separate question reg your setups of Inline/Pike.

    I'm using Cc initial recomendation but both climb/descent position still bobs too much when pedaling. Is that the matter of settings or PSI?

    Can You share with me some simple descriptions on how those LSC, LSR.... etc should be undestood(simple worda and tips how to see difference) ?
    I know that some guides must be online..

  50. #1650
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    I broke my 142x12 thru-axle yesterday!
    195 lbs-6'4" Banshee Prime XL
    Ride Mammoth, Tahoe & Vegas

    PLEASE GIVE ME NEGATIVE REP!

  51. #1651
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    I think I broke my axle because my shock lost a piston seal. Any suggestions on a coil shock for park days? I weigh 200 lbs loaded, what spring weight do I need?
    195 lbs-6'4" Banshee Prime XL
    Ride Mammoth, Tahoe & Vegas

    PLEASE GIVE ME NEGATIVE REP!

  52. #1652
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    Cane Creek has a calculator on their website for the CCDB coil.

  53. #1653
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    Quote Originally Posted by unrooted View Post
    I think I broke my axle because my shock lost a piston seal. Any suggestions on a coil shock for park days? I weigh 200 lbs loaded, what spring weight do I need?
    Easy math to figure out your coil:
    travel/shock stroke = generalized leverage. So in this case, 135mm/57mm= 2.36
    Multiply your body weight x generalized leverage. So 200lbs x 2.36= 472

    So a 450 or 500lb spring.

  54. #1654
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    Quote Originally Posted by FM View Post
    Easy math to figure out your coil:
    travel/shock stroke = generalized leverage. So in this case, 135mm/57mm= 2.36
    Multiply your body weight x generalized leverage. So 200lbs x 2.36= 472

    So a 450 or 500lb spring.
    That's cool, thanks! I just ordered a Vanilla coil which will be put together by Fox, hopefully they know what they are doing!
    195 lbs-6'4" Banshee Prime XL
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  55. #1655
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    A two birds with one stone miracle!

    It would seem that miracles do happen!

    I've had a creak issue since the end of last season. I had narrowed it down to the lower pivots. The creak only happens while pedaling.
    Near the start if this season I had a shop go over everything on my bike with a torque wrench. And, instead of getting rid of the creaking it made it substantially worse! WTF!
    A week later I had the shop pull the pivots apart and grease everything and toque it up to spec. Did that stop the creaking? F**K NO!

    I've literally gone over everything on the bike looking for what may be causing this creak several times. My make shift solution was to drop some lube on the lower pivots. That only stopped the creaking for a couple of rides till I lubed it again. Sometimes the lube wouldn't stop the creak! AARRRGGGHHH!

    The rest of this story is like two birds with one stone.

    So, Crankworx is happening right now in Whistler. And, I was wandering around the booths having look at stuff. As I walked past the eThirteen booth a light went off in my brain!
    I went over and talked to them about my rear hub issues. I have an LG1+ hub. What has been happening is the angular contact bearings in the hub have been binding and causing my cassette to roll forward with the wheel at times.
    I've had the bearings replaced earlier in the season but that didn't solve the issue. The shop also told me that it seemed that the torque from tightening the rear axle was also playing into the bearings binding. Because of that I've been playing a game of what is the correct tightness for the rear axle and not having the wheel wiggle in the frame but not have the bearings bind.

    The guy at the eThirteen booth told me to bring my wheel by and he'd have a look.

    I dropped off my wheel and when I came back to pick up my wheel he had replaced all the bearings. He also had swapped out the angular bearings with radial bearings, installed a missing washer/spacer and replaced the freehub body. All for free!

    Since then I have had no issues with the bearings binding making my cassette roll forward with the wheel and ALL the creaking has stopped!!

    I'm shocked to find out that my hub issue was related to my pivot creaking issue! Anyway, I'm stoked on my bike again! It's silent and the hub issue is fixed!

    I've been out smashing trails since the fix and all is well!

    Here's a shot from a ride in Squamish the other day.
    This is supposed to be a steep roll over but I thought I could turn it into an old school dorp to falt! (drop to flat - alright there was a touch of a transition but it was ugly!)
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-p8140179.jpg

    Here's a pano of that same drop.
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-fred-drop-pano3-stitch.jpg

  56. #1656
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    Well, glad you got your hub issue figured out. Sounds like there was some issues with missing parts on your rear hub? Guessing that is why the shop couldn't figure it out?

    Interesting they went from angular contact bearings to traditional radial bearings.

  57. #1657
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    Well, glad you got your hub issue figured out. Sounds like there was some issues with missing parts on your rear hub? Guessing that is why the shop couldn't figure it out?

    Interesting they went from angular contact bearings to traditional radial bearings.
    Yeah, it turns out a spacer was missing which was putting extra tension into the angular bearings forcing them to bind and stop rolling.
    I'm surprised that my shop didn't catch that when they replaced all the bearings in the hub earlier in the season.
    They did mention that it was an odd setup inside the hub that there was no edge/ledge for the bearings to rest up against to stop extra tension being forced into the bearings. I guess they just assumed that because the hub was brand new and had never been taken apart that all the parts should have been installed from the factory.

    I'm stoked that the creaking issue and hub issue have been sorted. I was at my wits end and was seriously thinking of giving up on this bike.
    I'm a happy mountain biker once again and back to being in love with riding my Prime!

  58. #1658
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    ^I have learned through the years to never trust anyone elses work. I guess I have dealt with enough people who "think" they know what is correct...that actually don't.


    OT Giant had a local bike demo day last night, and for fun the wife and I tried out some of the latest and greatest from Giant. I had a carbon Trance w/ 1x11 XT and the wife had a LIV Lust w/ 1x11 Gx stuff. Both were 27.5" wheeled bikes.

    I felt like a GIANT on an XL Trance (I am 6'2"), and the rear suspention really had me laughing a few times. I wasn't expecting much honestly, as a Trance really isn't in the same ballpark as my Prime...but damn, I would be really upset if I spent $5k on a bike and got those results. The wife liked her $4k Lust, but really only commented on her but not being sore (her current bike is a 29er HT), and that the Lust was twitchy.

    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-trance.jpg

  59. #1659
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    My friend recently bought a low end trance and it definitely feels like a xc race bike compared to my prime. Twitchy and flexy.
    195 lbs-6'4" Banshee Prime XL
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    PLEASE GIVE ME NEGATIVE REP!

  60. #1660
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    New kicks and a little bling.

    I put some new kicks on Prime.
    I also picked up a new cassette, chain and OneUp 16T/42T cogs.

    I'm excited about trying the WTB Trail Boss 2.4.
    In years past all the WTB tires I've tried have severely sucked for the terrain and conditions where I ride. But, in the last couple of months I've come across a few articles/reviews for the Trail Boss and Vigilante by reviewers that live and ride in my area. They had good things to say about the Trail Boss. So, I thought I'd give WTB another shot.

    I've been running the Maxxis Ardent 2.4 on the rear on both my Prime and Honzo for the last few years. I like the tire but it definitely lacks when things get wet. When it does get wet I just put up with it and deal with a really loose rear end of the bike. Most of the time it works out and sometimes it has me shaking my head thinking 'How the hell did I just make it through that section alive!'.

    Visually the Trail Boss is smaller volume-wise than the Ardent even though they are both listed at 2.4.
    What I'm hoping for from the Trail Boss is a more positive grip while cornering and better braking traction. The knobs are substantially larger than what are on the Ardent.
    I'll find out tomorrow when I go for ride.

    I changed the front up from a Hans Dampf to a Magic Mary. I've been running the MM in 27b (or is that 650.5?) on my DH bike and have really been liking it.
    I really like the HD but I thought I'd try something different.

    My OneUp 42T is showing some wear so it was time for a new one. I figured since the OneUp cog was wearing I should replace the cassette and chain. I went for the bling and picked up a KMC Ti chain in GOLD! It matchy-matchy's the Kashima gold on the fork stanchions, so, there you go!

    Alright, time for some bike porn!

    I found my first Stanimal when changing out my front tire!
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-20150821_124853.jpg

    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-20150821_135538.jpg

    Because one picture isn't enough!
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-20150821_135631.jpg
    Last edited by RideEverything; 08-22-2015 at 09:05 PM.

  61. #1661
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    ^I have learned through the years to never trust anyone elses work. I guess I have dealt with enough people who "think" they know what is correct...that actually don't.
    I get that but the shop I deal with is meticulous. They are strictly a repair shop and only sell peripherals for bikes.
    I'm willing to cut them some slack because how many different "standards" are there. And, I know they didn't mean any ill will. They went above and beyond with fully pulling my hub apart. Whereas most shops would most likely just send it off for warranty and then I'd be without a wheel for weeks.
    I have a very good relationship with them as well.

    Here in Whistler if the shop staff don't know its shit then they lose business right quick!

  62. #1662
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    Quote Originally Posted by RideEverything View Post
    I get that but the shop I deal with is meticulous. They are strictly a repair shop and only sell peripherals for bikes.
    I'm willing to cut them some slack because how many different "standards" are there. And, I know they didn't mean any ill will. They went above and beyond with fully pulling my hub apart. Whereas most shops would most likely just send it off for warranty and then I'd be without a wheel for weeks.
    I have a very good relationship with them as well.

    Here in Whistler if the shop staff don't know its shit then they lose business right quick!
    Well, its good to know you have a shop to rely on. Should have just bought Chris King hubs, then there would have been no confusion over silly washers and the like! :P

  63. #1663
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    Glad to hear you found the source of your creak R/E. Let us know how the Mary works out - I wasn't aware they made those in 29". I'm running 2.35 Dampfs and have no complaints, but more grip never hurts.

  64. #1664
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    The KS-Link Top Link Pivot aluminum Conical Washers seem to be very weak. I had the bolt just break throw the washer. I'm using 2 steal washers for now.


    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-conical-washers.jpg

  65. #1665
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    I am going to have to "assume" that you over torqued the bolt, which resulted in the broken washer?

    Also, if I remember correctly (which I might not!) the lip on the washer is supposed to seat inside the inner race of the bearing. Meaning that if you are using steel washers w/o a lip, there is nothing centering the bolt within the bearing. Sounds like you are asking for trouble.

  66. #1666
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    I used the recommend torque settings for the 2 top links. The aluminum Conical washer is just way to thin the bolt head punched throw. The steel washers i am using are the same size as the lip on the washer. So its only touching the inside of the bearing race.

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    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-20150902_192557.jpg

  68. #1668
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    Where's that? Nice looking trails, really longing to get off the island and back to N. America and some nice long, technical trails.

    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
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    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  69. #1669
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    Where's that? Nice looking trails, really longing to get off the island and back to N. America and some nice long, technical trails.
    9 mile in Wisconsin. Not many trails like that around here. This system has about 3-4 miles of pretty fun tech trails. Most of the trails in WI aren't really up to snuff with some of the crazy stuff out west.

  70. #1670
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    I'm happy with my new tires.

    The Magic Mary is a step up from the Hans Dampf, I feel. The side knobs have better support when cornering hard. They don't fold over unexpectedly like I've had happen on the HD side knobs. The MM also rolls well for how big the tread is. All in all it is a great gripping tire in the dry and wet. I'm running the TrailStar compound.

    The WTB Trail Boss that I've been running on the rear has really surprised me in how good it is in a wide range of conditions. It has more grip than the Ardent that I replaced it with. Better braking traction and way less drifty through corners than the Ardent. I'm not a big fan of drifty tires.
    The big surprise is how well the TB performs in the wet. It still has a lot of traction and breaks/slides away consistently on wet roots and rock. The treads do get packed up in the wet loam/wet dirt but still grip well even when that happens.
    I'm running the Tough Fast Rolling compound (firm rubber) on the Trail Boss. This is why I'm surprised with the good performance of the tire in the wet.


    I just came back from a two day bike trip on the Sunshine Coast, BC. We rode at the Coast Gravity Park for the first day. On the second day we did a few shuttle laps in the Roberts Creek area then pedaled the trails from there to the Sprokids Park near Gibsons. We rode some steep and deep loamy trails on that ride!

    I love that the Prime is a solid do-all bike. I could only bring one bike for this trip and the Prime held its own when riding at the Coast Gravity Park. Granted, there were a few times where a bigger bike would have been nice but the Prime did the job well.

    My friend chasing me down Mach Chicken.
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-g0340969.jpg

    My SO sending it on DNZ.
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-20150910_121033_7.jpg

    Me on the drop on DNZ.
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-img_20150910_120315.jpg

    Another angle of the same drop.
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-img_20150910_121110_3.jpg

  71. #1671
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    Wow!! Looks like you are taking full advantage of that extra pound of aluminum in the frame!

  72. #1672
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    Quote Originally Posted by JACKL View Post
    Wow!! Looks like you are taking full advantage of that extra pound of aluminum in the frame!
    I'm assuming that you mean the 2016 frame is a pound lighter?

    Either way, I'm 6'6" and about 245# geared up so I need a burly frame even for just mellow XC days!
    This is also the lightest bike I've ever owned so no complaints from me!

    On a side note, I just slashed a small hole that the sealant couldn't handle on my Magic Mary during yesterday's ride. I managed to roll the tire around where the hole was to get it semi-sealed while spewing a ton of sealant and manage to gingerly ride back to the car with barely enough pressure to not ding the rim.
    It sucks because this is my third hoe in a tubeless tire in two weeks that the sealant hasn't been able to deal with. The other two were on the rear of my hardtail, a Honzo. It's becoming an expensive feature, this tubeless thing!

    Does anyone know if you can patch a tire that has a small hole/slash so that it can be used as tubeless again?
    I was thinking of trying to glue a tube patch and then slapping some Gorilla Tape over it on the inside of the tires.

  73. #1673
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    Yes, you can patch tubeless tyres to run tubelesss again, just have to be careful, take your time and do it right. What I do first normally is try to stick the actual hole. tear together with something like the gel Crazy Glue which is a bit flexible, then I patch the inside with a piece of old tyre sidewall or if you can get them, an actual patch made for this, not a tube patch, they are not stiff enough for the job. Sometimes just gluing the hole is enough and the sealant will take are of the rest, sometimes not.

    Little trick you might not know is to add something to make bigger lumps to in the sealant, personally I've used glitter and black pepper.


    Quote Originally Posted by RideEverything View Post
    Does anyone know if you can patch a tire that has a small hole/slash so that it can be used as tubeless again?
    I was thinking of trying to glue a tube patch and then slapping some Gorilla Tape over it on the inside of the tires.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  74. #1674
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    Yes, you can patch tubeless tyres to run tubelesss again, just have to be careful, take your time and do it right. What I do first normally is try to stick the actual hole. tear together with something like the gel Crazy Glue which is a bit flexible, then I patch the inside with a piece of old tyre sidewall or if you can get them, an actual patch made for this, not a tube patch, they are not stiff enough for the job. Sometimes just gluing the hole is enough and the sealant will take are of the rest, sometimes not.

    Little trick you might not know is to add something to make bigger lumps to in the sealant, personally I've used glitter and black pepper.
    Thanks for the info.
    I'll try the crazy glue and see if it works out.
    Do you use the crazy glue for the patch on the inside of the tire as well?

  75. #1675
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    No, use tyre vulcanizing solution. Make sure no matter which "super" glue you get, you get the gel version, as said it's somewhat pliable.

    Quote Originally Posted by RideEverything View Post
    Thanks for the info.
    I'll try the crazy glue and see if it works out.
    Do you use the crazy glue for the patch on the inside of the tire as well?
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  76. #1676
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    Quote Originally Posted by RideEverything View Post
    I'm assuming that you mean the 2016 frame is a pound lighter?

    Either way, I'm 6'6" and about 245# geared up so I need a burly frame even for just mellow XC days!
    This is also the lightest bike I've ever owned so no complaints from me!
    Naa, I was just talking about the extra pound that the Prime weighs compared to some lesser trail or AM bikes. I'm glad it's there and I don't do half of what you do.

  77. #1677
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    Dear Prime/Cane Creek setup users.

    CC place online some "initial" settings for various frames.
    Have You found them helpfull?

    I'm asking as heard that some of them are really checked and customized but other are made just for sake of table and have not much to do with reality (users foud totally different settings as basic)

  78. #1678
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    The base tunes that are listed on both our website and the canecreek website where tunes that we felt worked well for the bikes after spending days with cane creek testing and dialing in tunes. They are just base tunes however! It is impossible to pre tune the shock for the rider perfectly as suspension setup is a very personal thing. Some like fast and lively, some like very slow and stable, and settings will change significantly with rider weight, ability, style and terrain they are riding.

    So think of the base tunes as a starting point, that we have picked along side cane creek, and then tweek it to your personal preferance using their field guide.
    Banshee Bikes Designer
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  79. #1679
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    ^I appreciate the fact that much testing may have been done, but all the settings for my CCDB Coil are almost right in the middle. Imho those settings arent' the result of testing, but rather a good starting point for ANYONE! ha

  80. #1680
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    Ah, that will be because we have never offered the DB coil with the rune, and so never tested it, and so never come up with a base tune, hence cane creek show middle settings as a blank.

    We have only ever offered the DBair, but you might find it useful to look at the DB air settings, as the damping is very similar.
    Banshee Bikes Designer
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  81. #1681
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    The Prime is the first FS bike I've had, or even ridden off road, so my opinion probably doesn't matter much, but I put my CC DBair on the suggested tune and have been riding it ever since, until my shock lost it's piston valve. . . right now I'm riding a Fox Vanilla Coil Shock, but I need to send my CC DBair in to get serviced.

    The Vanilla is really nice, but it has a slightly too heavy spring on it because I got the shock (through Fox) to be ridden at the resort since i think the trails there (lots of jump and drops to flat) are the reason why my DBair was blown out.
    195 lbs-6'4" Banshee Prime XL
    Ride Mammoth, Tahoe & Vegas

    PLEASE GIVE ME NEGATIVE REP!

  82. #1682
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    Quote Originally Posted by Placek View Post
    Dear Prime/Cane Creek setup users.

    CC place online some "initial" settings for various frames.
    Have You found them helpfull?

    I'm asking as heard that some of them are really checked and customized but other are made just for sake of table and have not much to do with reality (users foud totally different settings as basic)
    As said, the base tune is a good starting point.

    I'm running the CCDBaCS and started with the base tune and worked from there.
    In the end my LSC is pretty far from base and all the others are set a little bit off of the base tune point.

    I still feel that I need a volume reducer in the can. I've just been lazy in getting some to try. I have to run the pressure a little higher than I want to get the bottom out protection but it takes away from the shock soaking up the small chatter.
    I am a big guy so my settings and pressures on my suspension will be quite different from the average person. As well as making my suspension work way harder than the average sized person.

  83. #1683
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    Photo dump!

    I've riding quite a bit lately and loving life on the bike!
    The last couple of rides we took a bunch of photos as we rode some new-ish trails to us here in Whistler.
    It's shocking when you realize that there are trails in the valley that you don't ride much or haven't ridden at all!

    This trail has a ton of rock lines.


    My SO getting after it!


    I thought that the hole at the transition would be managed well by the 29" wheels...


    ...just a split second before bottoming my fork the hardest I've ever bottomed out a fork! Ever! KA-BLAMMM!!
    I'm honestly shocked that I didn't snap the fork with the sound that was made.


    A fun feature in the loaminess.


    It didn't matter the angle, there was no way to show on camera how tall and steep this line is.


    Here's a sequence of my SO riding the same line that gives it a little bit of perspective. This picture still doesn't really do the line justice.


    On today's ride we sessioned a trail I've only ridden a couple of times before. I hit all the features now so next time, hopefully, I'll be able to flow all the way through without stopping.

    Everything is gaps. All manageable but my brain doesn't like gaps no matter how small/manageable!


    I led my friend's dog into this jump so he'd know the speed needed!




    Nothing like dropping into a tight berm!

  84. #1684
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    You are nutz!!

  85. #1685
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    You are nutz!!
    LOL!
    Not nutz. I'm just trying to ride the Prime as hard as possible! Haha!

  86. #1686
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    Those pic are insane. I'm even more proud having prime.... But no skills yet.

  87. #1687
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    You are nutz!!
    X2. I daydream of stuff like that, but my jumps are scary little 3 footers, lol.
    Low and slack.

  88. #1688
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    That last picture looks like impending disaster! Good stuff.

  89. #1689
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    Those trails look fun!
    195 lbs-6'4" Banshee Prime XL
    Ride Mammoth, Tahoe & Vegas

    PLEASE GIVE ME NEGATIVE REP!

  90. #1690
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    Guys

    I’m in long proces of adjusting my CC Inline to Prime frame. STarted with base settings from web and wanted to truerly understand theory standing behing all this shortcuts and extend it with real life examples.

    So i started with SAG by turning all adjusters couter clockwise and achieved sweet spot

    Now is the hard part.

    First part of adjusting is important because this is 80% of my trails – so rooooty, long, very smooth pedalling sessions ocassionally tracking downhill (once again downhill with small rocks, no drops or jumps).
    For above (massive amount of shakes hitting my back and trying to change my line) - should i play with HSC/HSR or LSC/LSR considering also i need to support my speed by pedalling ?

    When You help me to decide with above please add how You start that
    Ex. This would be LSC/LSR and best would be to start with LSC set to 0 and play with LSR.

  91. #1691
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    Cane Creek Included a quick start guide w/ my DB Coil as well as a small notepad which outlined what each function of the shock did and how to adjust it. Was this not included w/ yours? I am sure Cane Creek would send you one.

  92. #1692
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    @Placek,

    As has been said, you, hopefully, should have got a manual, notebook and a set up card with your shock. All the info to help you understand how the shock works and what the settings do should be explained in the setup guide portion of the manual.

    Start with the base line settings, set your sag and go ride. From there change things one at a time so that you can figure out what works for you. (If you change too many things at once you won't know what is making the difference.) The best place to sort out your shock settings would be on a short trail with similar terrain that you regularly ride and just lap that over and over as you tweak your settings on your shock.

    I suggest trying both more and less on the Compression and Rebound settings. Then that way you'll know how the bike/shock reacts to the terrain and you can really zero in on what you like and don't like for your shock set up.
    Yes, the process takes a lot of time. But, in the end you'll be a happier mountain biker for it. It took me a better part of 2 months to really get my CCDBaCS setup to how I want it to ride. I started from the base settings on the Cane Creek website and went from there. I also read ALL of the manual and setup tips that came with my shock.

    The main theme here is to start with the base tune and go from there.
    It is quite hard to recommend settings because everyone is different in how, what and where they ride. Also factoring in weight and style of riding throws another curve ball to recommending settings.
    As an example I know two guys who are similar in weight and height and also ride the same bike. But their suspension set up so different from one another you'd think they were riding completely different bikes. They both ride the same trails but they like their bike suspension set ups completely different.
    Last edited by RideEverything; 09-29-2015 at 11:24 AM. Reason: More info

  93. #1693
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    Hello again!
    Time for more photos!

    This past weekend I took a trip down to the Seattle region and rode both days. On Saturday we rode at the Duthie Hill MTB Park and on Sunday we rode at Tiger Mountain on the new(ish) trails there.
    All in all a great time was had!

    What I really like about the Prime and how I have it built up is that I can ride everything I want and not worry much about whether the bike can handle it. I can go from riding straight up XC to sending drops and shooting steep tech freeride lines all on the same bike. And even all on the same ride!
    Admittedly, I am outriding the Fox 34 now. It's doing a stand up job. But I'm definitely taxing it's abilities seeing as I'm a heavy giant and charging hard.
    Ah, upgade-itis is a challenging bike disease! LOL!


    Duthie Hill:

    The second feature on HLC.
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-p9260002.jpg

    My SO hitting the last feature, Happy Endings step up jump, on HLC.
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-p9260020.jpg

    I swear I felt way cooler than I look in this pic!
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-p9260032.jpg

    I don't remember the name of this trail but it's in the Freeride Flow zone.
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-p9260055.jpg


    Tiger Mountain:

    Only one pic . This is the last big corner on OTG.
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-p9270066.jpg

    We rode the new DH trail at Tiger called Predator. It is super fun!
    The biggest challenge for a lot of the trails, especially Predator, at Tiger Mtn is that you can go SO fast! But, then there are sudden sections of tech. Nothing outrageous but surprisingly challenging when you don't know the trail. What also makes the tech challenging is that a lot of it is man made so it doesn't necessarily fit with the trail in spots.
    Regardless it was super fun!
    Our day of riding at Tiger was 1638m of climbing (which means we got to descend that much!) in a total distance of 32km. (That's 5374ft and 20 miles for those of you who don't know how to use Google.)


    If you're ever near Seattle/Issaquah I highly recommend both Duthie and Tiger Mountain for riding. Duthie has a wide selection of trails in a small area for all abilities.
    At Tiger you have to have a reasonable amount of fitness because there is a substantial climb to access the trails. Especially if you want to do multiple laps. But, it is well worth the climbing!


    @JACKL, I know you asked and got great info from the Washington board but if you have any questions about these two areas feel free to PM me or ask me here or on the other thread for info. I definitely think you'll get more bang for your buck if you stay around the Seattle area for riding when you visit.

  94. #1694
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    Sweet. We have it pretty good here....I had the pleasure of watching a lot of that stuff come together, being HLC alumni. Did you ride the big spacecoaster? (the advanced line off bootcamp)- that was my baby.

    If you looked at the tiled brick wall in the clearing, with the tiles labeled with contributors, you will notice there is a Banshee tile! How cool is that!

    Did you get the exit move on Predator(Tiger Mtn)? Looks scary but it ain't too bad...especially by your local standards!

  95. #1695
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    Quote Originally Posted by FM View Post
    Sweet. We have it pretty good here....I had the pleasure of watching a lot of that stuff come together, being HLC alumni. Did you ride the big spacecoaster? (the advanced line off bootcamp)- that was my baby.

    If you looked at the tiled brick wall in the clearing, with the tiles labeled with contributors, you will notice there is a Banshee tile! How cool is that!

    Did you get the exit move on Predator(Tiger Mtn)? Looks scary but it ain't too bad...especially by your local standards!
    Yeah, it was fun to ride new stuff and check out how the everything else has held up.

    We did ride Spacecoaster. It is fun! It has a great flow to it! Although, we did ride it when we got there in the morning and all the wood was really wet and slick which made it entertaining riding it blind! That log ride on Boot Camp almost killed me because it was so slick!! Granted I had a fair amount to drink the previous evening and was definitely feeling it while riding that day! Nothing better to test your skill set than to ride hungover!

    I only had a brief look at the Sponsor(?) Wall and didn't notice the Banshee tile. That's cool that they've pitched in to help fund Duthie!

    Yes, we both cleaned the exit move. Is that what's being called the Waterfall? It is spicy! Especially when your tires are a bit wet from the dirt. We did have to wait a bit because we caught up to a few people struggling to walk down the feature - I guess the double black rating didn't clue them in! It makes me wonder if they rode the steep tech in the section above that move! LOL!
    A criticism I have is the two table jumps near the top of Predator. It seems like someone really, really wanted to have proper jumps built into the trail so they slapped two of them into that flat-ish spot into an uphill. To clear them you basically need to be pinned and pedaling(!) through the tech chute before to have the speed to clear both of them properly. I had to work hard to just clear the first one and cased the second one in the 3 times I tried it.
    I really like all the "natural" doubles and hits that are sprinkled along the trail. What I thought was cool is that most of the man made tech was set up so that if you had the balls and skill you could gap through those sections. I managed to gap a few of them. Most of them on the lower section of Predator.
    One other comment in relation to Predator: there's a handful of vids on YouTube of Predator and they are doing no favors for showcasing the trail. I realize that no one has any control over that but when I was looking for pics and vid to see what the trail was like most of the vids are brutal. Forget about the serious lack of editing. The riding being showcased by the camera wearers is brutal! Just my opinion. So, take it as you will.


    All in all it was a great weekend of riding! It's always nice to go and ride somewhere else and to see new trails.

  96. #1696
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    I just can't stop... RIDING!!

    I do have a lot of free time right now. What better to do than fill it with riding your ass off!

    I love going away to ride because it explodes my stoke level and makes me want to ride like crazy when I get home.
    Damn, I love riding at home in Whistler!
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-p9290011.jpg

    Of course I ride with my partner in crime! My baby mama!
    If you're curious she's on a Knolly Chilcotin.
    Production Prime Photo/Build thread-p9290017.jpg


    If anyone here is fed up or annoyed with my excessive stoke picture posting let me know and I'll share my stoke elsewhere. Otherwise I'll keep sharing the stoke here!!

  97. #1697
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    No, don't think anyone is, just jealous as hell you've got such sweet trails to ride and cahones to hit those big features you do, keep it coming.

    If anyone here is fed up or annoyed with my excessive stoke picture posting let me know and I'll share my stoke elsewhere. Otherwise I'll keep sharing the stoke here!!
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  98. #1698
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    Hi RideEverything

    Your comments are valid and believe me that with my tech/It background i always try to collect all necessary information's and read guides before start to ask.
    I tried to follow the recommended values and here are my confusions - questions.

    1. On my quite easy trail with just 2 or 3 3ft jumps my Inline bottomed out - according to instruction i should increase HSC (1/2turn) - correct ?
    2. Reg HSR - understand that this value must be changed in a moments like leaving jumps and avoiding "being blown away" after landing
    3. I have too much pedal bob but on other hand when i increase LSC than not much is changing (Inline moves almost the same) - normal ?
    4. LSC - my trail to test is flat but very rooty and i ride it quite fast. SHall i play with LSC to improve smoothness?
    5. "To improve the ability for the rear wheel to follow the terrain, decrease LSR" - that means i'll make the rear wheel coming back slower - but how it would impact rooty terrain - i need quite fast coming back for next roots.




    As a summary my perspective about rooty terrain is to have LSC quite low to make it small-bump sensitive and LSR quite high to allow it rebound faster.That is tottaly opposite to jumps and drops where HSC should be quite high to avoid bottoming and HSR slow to make landing smooth


    Quote Originally Posted by RideEverything View Post
    @Placek,

    As has been said, you, hopefully, should have got a manual, notebook and a set up card with your shock. All the info to help you understand how the shock works and what the settings do should be explained in the setup guide portion of the manual.

    Start with the base line settings, set your sag and go ride. From there change things one at a time so that you can figure out what works for you. (If you change too many things at once you won't know what is making the difference.) The best place to sort out your shock settings would be on a short trail with similar terrain that you regularly ride and just lap that over and over as you tweak your settings on your shock.

    I suggest trying both more and less on the Compression and Rebound settings. Then that way you'll know how the bike/shock reacts to the terrain and you can really zero in on what you like and don't like for your shock set up.
    Yes, the process takes a lot of time. But, in the end you'll be a happier mountain biker for it. It took me a better part of 2 months to really get my CCDBaCS setup to how I want it to ride. I started from the base settings on the Cane Creek website and went from there. I also read ALL of the manual and setup tips that came with my shock.

    The main theme here is to start with the base tune and go from there.
    It is quite hard to recommend settings because everyone is different in how, what and where they ride. Also factoring in weight and style of riding throws another curve ball to recommending settings.
    As an example I know two guys who are similar in weight and height and also ride the same bike. But their suspension set up so different from one another you'd think they were riding completely different bikes. They both ride the same trails but they like their bike suspension set ups completely different.

  99. #1699
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    If riding fast through rooty terrain, it will actually be the HSC that is most linked to small bump compliance. Sounds to me like you shuld increase LSC, reduce HSC and add a volume spacer or 2 (for bottom out resistance)

    I think of it this way in basic form:

    More volume spacers = more progressive = harder to bottom out for same small bump sensitivity

    Increasing LSC = Reduced movement of suspension when pedaling, pumping terrain and railing corners when compressing

    Increasing LSR = like LSC but in rebound, and most noticable noticable when pedaling, puming out of corners and bunny hopping I find.

    Increasing HSC = Reducing suppleness of suspension through sharp hits and helps resist bottom out on bigger hits.

    Increasing HSR = Less lively feel when rebounding from deep in travel on jumps and g-outs
    Banshee Bikes Designer
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    Banshee Blog

  100. #1700
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    That blowed my way of thinking.
    Untill now i thought that when i take many small roots but ridden fast than i should focus on LSC as the shaft speed involve small oil circle (bearing in mind big hit=big oil cirle).
    Am i correct ?


    Quote Originally Posted by builttoride View Post
    If riding fast through rooty terrain, it will actually be the HSC that is most linked to small bump compliance. Sounds to me like you shuld increase LSC, reduce HSC and add a volume spacer or 2 (for bottom out resistance)

    I think of it this way in basic form:

    Increasing HSC = Reducing suppleness of suspension through sharp hits and helps resist bottom out on bigger hits.