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  1. #1
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    Tibet and Nepal pics

    Here are a handful of pix mostly fro Tibet but a couple as we entered Nepal.
    I posted a couple of them way back when, but hopefully you will enjoy them regardless.
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  2. #2
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    Awesome. I have been wanting to explore Nepal, Tibet and Northern India. Did you guys have any problems? Did you bike tour, or did you have a vehicle?
    Moving to Bend? Let me help.
    Derek Faller - www.BendHouseSeller.com

  3. #3
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    I went through KE. There were 4 of us as paying customers and we met for the first time in Kathmandu . The official company guide had never done the trip. The trip was mostly run logistically by Pramod Sherestra. He hired two Tibetan driver and two Nepali cooks and knew the route inside and out.
    That seems to be the mode of the companies that do tours there: hire the locals to run the show. We were out 19 days. I went in 2005, before the recent widespread stomping of Tibetans.
    I'm unsure if the Chinese society control freaks are letting in tour groups from the west access Tibet just yet, although I see some companies are selling trips as "guaranteed"(insured?). The Tibetans are friendly and gracious, the Chinese there are rude greedheads. The Chinese troops don't smile and wave off photogs. Most of the Chinese are commercial transplants, soldiers or rabid tourists. The Nepalis(who have the most to lose financially if tourism drops) panic when a client even looks at the Chinese troops. So that part is weird and demonstrative of how tenous things are there while they "liberate China" from the "revolutionary plotters."(really mining and developing randomly)... Kinda like FOX, only there is no other voice.
    The only evident issue we had was a Chinese checkpoint guard who wanted to take my money and a tour of the Potala Palace that KE failed to book so we didn't get to go in. Also, you've got to realize it is NOT DISNEYLAND. There are no EMTs that will come to your rescue, shopping centers etc.. You are out there. The caveat is that I understand the Chinese have been paving large sections of the gravel roads and cart paths for tourist and commercial access, so I expect much of the once dirt road, cart path and trail ride is now really a road ride. All the companies make you buy airlift insurance, but I suspect you'd never want to exercise that service, if it shows up at all. Still, if you are reasonably fit, can tolerate a bit of altitude sickness ( initial) want a guided adventure, it's incredible.
    Last edited by Raineman; 02-17-2009 at 08:08 AM.

  4. #4
    I bike long tyme.
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    Amazing photos!
    Thanks for posting!
    People wait for me on the way up. I wait for them on the way down.

  5. #5
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    Wow, so it can be done! ONe of my life's goals is to do just this.

    Love seeing the Suunto! I have a Metron myself, but never got it to go that high!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerk_Chicken
    Wow, so it can be done! ONe of my life's goals is to do just this.

    Love seeing the Suunto! I have a Metron myself, but never got it to go that high!
    Then you'll like this one too(Our highest was 18,600', but no pics of the Suunto there. There was halfway between EBC and ABC. This one is from the Pang La):
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  7. #7
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    If you book a trip, just be prepared that things could be stopped at any moment. Stuff like having pictures of the Dalai Lama or discussing politics with any Tibetans will get you detained. This is from an article yesterday, but seems to reference an area of Tibet. .:

    Asked if the area was still open to foreigners, an official at the county tourism bureau refused to answer directly, but told the Guardian: "It's better not to come – you know, you will have problems if you take pictures. Better not to come, otherwise you will inconvenience yourself as well as us."

    A hotel receptionist in Lithang told Reuters it was "unclear" whether foreigners were permitted to travel there.

    Several areas of Ganze saw major unrest last year as protests rippled across Tibetan parts of western China following the Lhasa riots. Lithang is reported to have seen mass arrests the previous year after a nomad stood up in front of thousands at the annual horse festival and demanded the return of the Dalai Lama. He was jailed for subversion and inciting separatism.

    Ethnically Tibetan areas of southern Gansu province have been closed to non-Chinese travellers for several weeks.

    "I think foreigners can't come at the moment. I believe it started in January and will probably end at the end of March," said an employee at the tourism office of Gannan.

    An official at the propaganda office said the authorities had issued instructions. Asked why, he replied: "You know, what happened last year – it's for prevention. There's nothing happening here at the moment."

    In Qinghai province, which also saw protests last year, one tourism official said he did not know of closures. But another employee said: "There are some special scenic places which you cannot go to."

  8. #8
    dft
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    cool looking trip.
    on your trip, did you have any segments that were longest stretches of singletrack descent?
    like any 4000 foot pure singletrack, kinda technical trails?

    thanks

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by dft
    cool looking trip.
    on your trip, did you have any segments that were longest stretches of singletrack descent?
    like any 4000 foot pure singletrack, kinda technical trails?

    thanks
    There was one one remarkable descent that I described in another post some time ago. It was off the 17,200' Pang La into a side trail that plunged down over rocky stuff. Our Nepali guide, Pramod, was freaking out at our speed and was hollering after us to slow down for the instant we saw him. I split a 517 rim lengthwise en route, but the tire didn't flat ( weird eh?) I ws like freedom after many days of holding back since the trip was mostly covering miles and miles of wide open valleys on dirt roads broken up by 1-3 hour climbs up some huge passes (La).
    I got it on authoritative word today that the Chinese have indeed been aggressively paving the route. Now there are only 3 days worth of dirt riding out of 19 and all else is paved, soon to be all the way from Lhasa to Everest Base Camp. It's a lost ride now.
    You might look into a Pokhara ride. There are some great multi day singletrack rides there. Time to research the politics and risks involved. Bhutan is supposed to offer some awesome stuff.
    Last edited by Raineman; 02-23-2009 at 12:51 PM.

  10. #10
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    This was a news item last week, reflecting the iffy nature of travleling in Tibet if you aren't Chinese:

    Tourist agencies were contacted on Wednesday by officials and told to cancel all trips for the foreseeable future. "We had a meeting with the tourist bureau and were asked to stop all groups from entering Tibet for at least the next couple of months," said Wan Feng, at Tibet Yak Travel.

    Foreigners require a permit to enter Tibet, but Youth Travel Service, one of the largest travel agencies, said few, if any, permits were being issued.

    "It is very very difficult to get a permit at the moment. We will have to wait and see when they become available again," said a spokesman.

    Another company, Tsedang China Travel, said it was unsure whether travel would even be possible in April. Mr Wan said the ban on foreigners was for "sensitive, political, reasons".

  11. #11
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    Bumping a year old thread, I know, but man those photos are awesome and I just wanted to thank you for sharing.

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    wow...trip of a lifetime

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raineman
    If you book a trip, just be prepared that things could be stopped at any moment. Stuff like having pictures of the Dalai Lama or discussing politics with any Tibetans will get you detained. This is from an article yesterday, but seems to reference an area of Tibet. .:

    Asked if the area was still open to foreigners, an official at the county tourism bureau refused to answer directly, but told the Guardian: "It's better not to come you know, you will have problems if you take pictures. Better not to come, otherwise you will inconvenience yourself as well as us."

    A hotel receptionist in Lithang told Reuters it was "unclear" whether foreigners were permitted to travel there.

    Several areas of Ganze saw major unrest last year as protests rippled across Tibetan parts of western China following the Lhasa riots. Lithang is reported to have seen mass arrests the previous year after a nomad stood up in front of thousands at the annual horse festival and demanded the return of the Dalai Lama. He was jailed for subversion and inciting separatism.

    Ethnically Tibetan areas of southern Gansu province have been closed to non-Chinese travellers for several weeks.

    "I think foreigners can't come at the moment. I believe it started in January and will probably end at the end of March," said an employee at the tourism office of Gannan.

    An official at the propaganda office said the authorities had issued instructions. Asked why, he replied: "You know, what happened last year it's for prevention. There's nothing happening here at the moment."

    In Qinghai province, which also saw protests last year, one tourism official said he did not know of closures. But another employee said: "There are some special scenic places which you cannot go to."
    I was in southern Gansu at the time you mentioned and had no problems.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raineman
    There was one one remarkable descent that I described in another post some time ago. It was off the 17,200' Pang La into a side trail that plunged down over rocky stuff. Our Nepali guide, Pramod, was freaking out at our speed and was hollering after us to slow down for the instant we saw him. I split a 517 rim lengthwise en route, but the tire didn't flat ( weird eh?) I ws like freedom after many days of holding back since the trip was mostly covering miles and miles of wide open valleys on dirt roads broken up by 1-3 hour climbs up some huge passes (La).
    I got it on authoritative word today that the Chinese have indeed been aggressively paving the route. Now there are only 3 days worth of dirt riding out of 19 and all else is paved, soon to be all the way from Lhasa to Everest Base Camp. It's a lost ride now.
    You might look into a Pokhara ride. There are some great multi day singletrack rides there. Time to research the politics and risks involved. Bhutan is supposed to offer some awesome stuff.
    Tibet is a huge place if you think the Chinese are paving everything your sadly mistaken.

    Try highway 219.

    Try this to get a feel of the place http://www.mychinamoto.com/forums/sh...u-Lhasa-Ali%29

    Raineman spent what 3 weeks on a bike there he didn't even touch on the place.3 weeks on a motorcycle and you wouldn't touch on the place.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Raineman
    This was a news item last week, reflecting the iffy nature of travleling in Tibet if you aren't Chinese:

    Tourist agencies were contacted on Wednesday by officials and told to cancel all trips for the foreseeable future. "We had a meeting with the tourist bureau and were asked to stop all groups from entering Tibet for at least the next couple of months," said Wan Feng, at Tibet Yak Travel.

    Foreigners require a permit to enter Tibet, but Youth Travel Service, one of the largest travel agencies, said few, if any, permits were being issued.

    "It is very very difficult to get a permit at the moment. We will have to wait and see when they become available again," said a spokesman.

    Another company, Tsedang China Travel, said it was unsure whether travel would even be possible in April. Mr Wan said the ban on foreigners was for "sensitive, political, reasons".
    You have always needed a permit to enter Tibet under the present Govt.

    60 years ago no foreigners where allowed to enter to Tibet when it was under Tibetan control.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainCogset
    Awesome. I have been wanting to explore Nepal, Tibet and Northern India. Did you guys have any problems? Did you bike tour, or did you have a vehicle?
    Looks like he did a tour with back up vehicle.

    Other people have done it the hard way by themselves.

    http://www3.utsidan.se/corax-e/2002/2002pro.htm

  17. #17
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    Great pics Raineman!!

    I MTB'd in Northern Thailand (Chiang Rai) for a day with a MTB guide - very nice. Would love to do Tibet/Nepal soon. I wonder what the safety situation is like in Nepal now? I would love to go some time soon.

  18. #18
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    very nice

  19. #19
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    Very sweet photos! I was in Nepal 2 years back but did not get a chance to ride. Man did I wished I had my bike with me.,

  20. #20
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    Pokhara...

    Quote Originally Posted by Raineman
    There was one one remarkable descent that I described in another post some time ago. It was off the 17,200' Pang La into a side trail that plunged down over rocky stuff. Our Nepali guide, Pramod, was freaking out at our speed and was hollering after us to slow down for the instant we saw him. I split a 517 rim lengthwise en route, but the tire didn't flat ( weird eh?) I ws like freedom after many days of holding back since the trip was mostly covering miles and miles of wide open valleys on dirt roads broken up by 1-3 hour climbs up some huge passes (La).
    I got it on authoritative word today that the Chinese have indeed been aggressively paving the route. Now there are only 3 days worth of dirt riding out of 19 and all else is paved, soon to be all the way from Lhasa to Everest Base Camp. It's a lost ride now.
    You might look into a Pokhara ride. There are some great multi day singletrack rides there. Time to research the politics and risks involved. Bhutan is supposed to offer some awesome stuff.
    Pokhara is disneyland! Fun Fun Fun!!

  21. #21
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    Thank you for sharing this with us, I love it very much, seems like this adventure was so exciting.

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