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  1. #1
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    Moving to Guilin, China in August

    Im moving to Guilin, China at the end of this summer and I am extremely excited about the opportunities for some good rides there. I can't find much info on mountain biking though, everything I have found is about taking touristy guided rides on some crappy commuter bikes. Has anyone ridden in Guilin? The terrain there makes it seem like there should be a really healthy MTB community there.

    Also, what kind of options for bikes will I have when Im in China? I don't think Ill be bringing my own bike with me so Ill have to get one there. Are decent bikes easy to come by there?

  2. #2
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    SDK, the terrain is really good in China, especially in the west Guilin looks really good too!

    A lot really depends on what kind of riding you are into. Most Chinese where I am are into group riding on fairly boring 26 inch alu hardtail XC bikes with long lunches. If you are into AM/FR finding great places to ride is easy, but finding good bikes and equipment for that kind of riding is much harder, so think about bringing your own.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the advice lew. Im currently riding single track trails but I am open to trying anything that is available and fun in China. Group rides with long lunches don't sound too appealing to me (at least not on a regular basis) but I've always planned on riding alone or with a friend who is going with.

    The equipment thing does present me with a bit of a dilemma. My stock Raleigh M80 isn't anything too special and by the time I would buy a bag to transport it and pay the associated fees to bring it with I would probably be exceeding the original purchase price of the bike itself. Of course if it's going to be better than what is in China I may just put some money into upgrades for it and just take it with. Definitely something to think about so thanks for the heads up.

    Any other advice you can think of for biking in China would be appreciated.

  4. #4
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    If you are going to be in China finding or ordering Taiwanese bikes is possible, as are American brands. Given the terrain a Raleigh M80 isn't worth bringing, as you'd able to pick up something similar fairly easily.

    May I suggest you save and invest for something like a Giant Trance X shown here on Taobao Chinese ebay, but still isn't cheap at over 1000 dollars for frame and shock, and annoyingly you'll get no warranty here. You can order from a Giant shop, but it will cost more

    If that's too much then there are loads of built Giant XTCs and ATXs according to budget.
    I posted this about possible trails in another thread:
    1. Goat trails. Can be very steep, need to be walked up to get an idea of the lines.
    2. Farmers footpaths. With terraced farming there are fields that often go up the sides of mountains, often giving a fun single track descent.
    3. Family shrine/mountain graveyard trails. On the sides of many mountains there are lots of footpaths, that are worn in and used sporadically to go to family tombs and graves. However these rarely go to any peaks and frequently are dead-ends.
    4. Hiking trails. These vary from very busy tourist area mountain climbs that are paved with stairs that you absolutely cannot ride, to a blurred line between a local tourist/footpath/mountain goat trail that usually go up to a peak or temple on top of a mountain.
    Any more questions?.....I'll keep posting answers as well as I can.
    Last edited by lew242; 04-24-2012 at 10:50 PM.

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    That is great to know, thanks for the link. One of the ideas that another guy I was talking to had was to take some of the higher end components with me and then to assemble them on a frame there. This is likely what Ill be doing now. The information on trails is also very helpful. Im guessing that there are not many dedicated biking/hiking trails that you've encountered?

    Also, what do you do for securing your bike in China? I've heard that bikes are frequently stolen there and while I don't plan on leaving my bike outside at any point I could see situations where I may have to.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by SDKmann
    One of the ideas that another guy I was talking to had was to take some of the higher end components with me and then to assemble them on a frame there.
    That is good advice. Things like bars over 680mm, stems under 90mm are hard to get. 99% of things are completely geared to cross country riders. These days though places like Chain Reaction do ship to China, and it's not a big deal buying online.

    Quote Originally Posted by SDKmann
    Im guessing that there are not many dedicated biking/hiking trails that you've encountered?
    There are dedicated hiking trails, but I've never come across an official cycling trail, although I'm sure they exist somewhere.

    Quote Originally Posted by SDKmann
    Also, what do you do for securing your bike in China? I've heard that bikes are frequently stolen there and while I don't plan on leaving my bike outside at any point I could see situations where I may have to.
    Generally there are very cheap bikes that you can buy, so often we just have a 'shopper' and keep our best bike in our apartment, in the end the 'shopper' it becomes a donor bike, and mine is pretty good these days. In my city electric scooters are very common and thieves target those more than bicycles. Also most Chinese people use a very cheap lock to lock rear wheel, so they can be stolen very easily, if you use a good lock and attach your bike to something, it's highly unlikely it would get stolen at least where I live.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for all the help, it is very much appreciated. Those were all the questions I had but Ill be sure to post again if I think of some more.

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