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  1. #1
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    Why do Hikers...?

    I met up with more than the usual hikers this weekend for some reason.

    Every exchange was pleasant (even the off leash large dogs were nice). They moved over, I moved over, said good morning and went on our ways.

    In addition to this, almost every group asked me if there was "anyone else with me".

    I guess I can understand this, but I never ask any other trail users if they have other people with them. I guess I don't really care.

    Are hikers being terrorized by the infamous "second biker in line?" I don't see enough traffic on our local trails to really understand this behavior.

    This is just a stupid post. Feel free to take it off topic and flame as appropriate. Basically, I think it is stupid to have to tell hikers that no, there is no one behind me when I want to say: "keep your eyes and ears alert, and maybe you will find out for yourselves."
    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak
    And I thought I had a bike obsession. You are at once tragic and awesome.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enel
    I met up with more than the usual hikers this weekend for some reason.

    Every exchange was pleasant (even the off leash large dogs were nice). They moved over, I moved over, said good morning and went on our ways.

    In addition to this, almost every group asked me if there was "anyone else with me".

    I guess I can understand this, but I never ask any other trail users if they have other people with them. I guess I don't really care.

    Are hikers being terrorized by the infamous "second biker in line?" I don't see enough traffic on our local trails to really understand this behavior.

    This is just a stupid post. Feel free to take it off topic and flame as appropriate. Basically, I think it is stupid to have to tell hikers that no, there is no one behind me when I want to say: "keep your eyes and ears alert, and maybe you will find out for yourselves."
    Seriously?

    They are just asking so they know whether to wait or continue.
    Where are you riding? On South, riders typically ride in groups, sometimes a rider get's a good lead on everyone else. I always tell hikers how many are behind me. Most are greatful, some seem annoyed.

    I think you know all this though.
    Quote Originally Posted by azdog View Post
    I think he was born around the time of the Chernobyl fallout which would explain a lot.

  3. #3
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    They just want to know if someone else is coming along who may not be right on your tail so they know what to expect and can move out of the way. No biggie, IMO. Plus, I usually tell them, "x more coming behind me"
    Ride more; post less...

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by waltaz
    They just want to know if someone else is coming along who may not be right on your tail so they know what to expect and can move out of the way. No biggie, IMO. Plus, I usually tell them, "x more coming behind me"
    Okay, sorry for the post. I ride alone most of the time. I ride in Prescott where seeing 2-3 other folks on a three hour ride is the usual max. Most times I see no one.

    Should the protocol be that as I pass by and exchange pleasantries I also add: "I'm alone"
    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak
    And I thought I had a bike obsession. You are at once tragic and awesome.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enel
    Okay, sorry for the post. I ride alone most of the time. I ride in Prescott where seeing 2-3 other folks on a three hour ride is the usual max. Most times I see no one.

    Should the protocol be that as I pass by and exchange pleasantries I also add: "I'm alone"
    You should say, "I'm alone...all alone...[suggestive wink]." Then write it up if anything exciting happened.

  6. #6
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    Pretty common to inform the hikers or riders if there are more in your group coming up.

    I will agree with your comment that hikers have been pretty nice lately. They have also been asking/talking a lot more to me than usual. I've gotten the 'anymore coming" question a lot, and just general inquiriesin both phx and Flagstaff. Couple guys even wanted to look at the feature on my bike and were interested in my tire selection....they seemed a little bummed when I said I was gonna move along.

    Did they have a big meeting and are trying to be more understanding??? or are they trying to lure us into some type of complacency before their master plan to take over the trails is executed?
    Salvation Outdoor
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  7. #7
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    "One behind"
    "Two in back"
    "3 More"
    "Last one"
    "None behind"

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enel
    Okay, sorry for the post. I ride alone most of the time. I ride in Prescott where seeing 2-3 other folks on a three hour ride is the usual max. Most times I see no one.

    Should the protocol be that as I pass by and exchange pleasantries I also add: "I'm alone"
    Actually, protocal is to say "I'm a loner."

    (In all seriousness, unless you're riding with others, no need to let hikers know IMO, unless they ask of course.)
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  9. #9
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    Maybe it's because I ride in large-ish groups a lot (the guiding thing), but I always, always proactively tell the first hiker I come across how many riders are in my group. It's easy courtesy. It costs nothing. Hikers I've chatted with appreciate knowing how long they should stay off the trail, rather than getting started again and *whoops* there's another biker, but now they're not somewhere they can easily step off.

    p.

  10. #10
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    Ill usually tell hikers how many more are coming and more often than not they huff and puff and say "oh great". . .

  11. #11
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    jeez Enel, you country-folk gettin' all surprised by our big-city ways! we might ask ya to use a fork too

    the extra communication i think does pay into the karma bank on a crowded trail like Somo - i figure anything i can do to let the hikers know i'm a nice guy and making an effort to share the trail is good for all of us.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enel
    Should the protocol be that as I pass by and exchange pleasantries I also add: "I'm alone"

    "SOLO!" at the top of your lungs works well too.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nat
    You should say, "I'm alone...all alone...[suggestive wink]." Then write it up if anything exciting happened.

    lol!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by chollaball
    jeez Enel, you country-folk gettin' all surprised by our big-city ways! we might ask ya to use a fork too .
    I hear he's very good with a knife...I mean that in the best of ways

    it's all that stealthy riding you do Enel
    Darwin was an Optimist

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enel
    Okay, sorry for the post. I ride alone most of the time. I ride in Prescott where seeing 2-3 other folks on a three hour ride is the usual max. Most times I see no one.

    Should the protocol be that as I pass by and exchange pleasantries I also add: "I'm alone"
    That's exactly what I do all the time. I go by and say, "thanks, I'm solo." Then they know not to just stand there like a dope wondering if someone else will come flying by.

  16. #16
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    I like to do my best Clint Eastwood impression and say, "I'm a lone wolf!" and then I HOWL at the top of my lungs and sprint away at breakneck speed. I'm a hairy guy, so it's an easy sell.

  17. #17
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    Ot

    I went skiing this morning.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  18. #18
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    looks cold Dave...you need a Pugsley (and chains) for up there
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul B
    Maybe it's because I ride in large-ish groups a lot (the guiding thing), but I always, always proactively tell the first hiker I come across how many riders are in my group. It's easy courtesy. It costs nothing. Hikers I've chatted with appreciate knowing how long they should stay off the trail, rather than getting started again and *whoops* there's another biker, but now they're not somewhere they can easily step off.

    p.
    Just before you meet a hiker or even meeting another group of bikers coming the opposite direction is a great time to re-group. That way the everyone steps off the trail once, not 15 times.

    I thought of this protocol when backpacking into Loon Lake, Idaho, a popular multi-use trail (and excellent destination for mountain bikes if you're ever in the area.) After meeting a group of 20 dirt bikes, strung out at quarter-mile intervals to avoid choking in each other's dust, I got pretty irritated, but tried not to show it. A couple of them even stopped to chat -- turned out that I know them from work.

    Practicality dictates that the hiker almost always gets off the trail, regardless of what the right of way rules suggest. A little bit of politeness or a thank you makes it easier for them to continue this behavior without feeling that they have somehow lost out.

    Just drop the whole master-of-the-universe attitude and before you know it, all of the hateful old hikers who remember the time before mountain bikes will have all died off or forgotten. Then the trails will be ours forever
    "Thank you, God, for letting me have another day"
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  20. #20
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    Enel,
    I totally know what you mean.
    I can't help but wonder what good these pieces of information are on a crowded trail.
    I feel that one must be ready for what may be lurking around EVERY blind turn.
    So what difference does it make how many are in a party?

    Well, as everyone stated: hiker needs to make the decision as to whether or not he will keep hiking or take a breather waiting for the rest of the party to pass by (esp with moto's @ 1/4 mile increments).... But riders @ riders, the number-in-the-party-hollering makes little sense to me. What am I to do with this information that I am not already doing all the time? I'm ready, at every turn, no matter how crowded, to avoid a collision.
    Does the recipient of the number-in-the-party info then relax and not worry about what is coming next when he counts off the number? What if there is a party 20 yards behind the party in question.... shrug.

  21. #21
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    I make it a point to get along with the hikers. I will always slow down when passing a hiker, give them a pleasant "good morning", and "thank you", when they yield the line. You still get the occasional rude hikers, but they are mostly friendly on DC anyway.

    I like the lone wolf comment, I usually ride solo, maybe if I just howl at the sky when I go by they would give me an even wider path!

  22. #22
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    I/We typically always are pleasant on the trail.
    Most of the groups I ride with will dismount for horses but we don't feel the need to do so with hikers. I share much of the sentiment offered up in this thread and believe a little courtesy goes a long way. I'm prone to saying "Good Morning" and "I'm the caboose" or "Two more a bit behind" and I think that the hikers who care appreciate it and those that don't care don't mind.

    I ride a bit on the fire roads here in SoCal and some of them have hikers on them and if there was one thing I would change that is the hikers' attitude that they can spread their three or four bodies across the 15 foot wide road with no penalty.

    Dear Fire Road Hikers:
    "It is road folks! Treat it like one and we will all get along. I'll pass on the left just like a car and when I come around the corner I'll be on the right side, just like a car!"

    Dear Single Track Hikers:
    "I know you may not believe it but I can pass you quite safely without you doing too much if only you will act in a predictable manner. I can ride almost any line and will typically take whatever one you would like to give. You don't even have to stop, just give me some space somewhere..."
    ===============

    Mark

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by u2metoo
    "SOLO!" at the top of your lungs works well too.
    Works best after first coming to s screeching/skidding/ eroding stop right in front of them and yelling "YIELD THE TRAIL PEDESTRIAN!", I bet.

    I have seriously scared the living daylights out of folks (not meaning too) when coming behind them, slowing to a snails pace, and trying to politely get their attention. When they finally hear me, they jump off the trail like I was running them down.

    I'm sort of a meek mild mannered fellow and don't like talking/shouting out loud, so I click my brake levers, coast (with the Hope I would think this is adequate), or do the "I'm in this bathroom stall" cough.

    I much prefer encounters where the other trail user is coming towards me.

    I dunno, maybe I need to go to some sort of "hiker interaction training" Like when dogs go to rattlesnake school.
    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak
    And I thought I had a bike obsession. You are at once tragic and awesome.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by ionsmuse
    I went skiing this morning.
    Any Lewis and or Clark remnants up there?
    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak
    And I thought I had a bike obsession. You are at once tragic and awesome.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enel
    Works best after first coming to s screeching/skidding/ eroding stop right in front of them and yelling "YIELD THE TRAIL PEDESTRIAN!", I bet.

    I have seriously scared the living daylights out of folks (not meaning too) when coming behind them, slowing to a snails pace, and trying to politely get their attention. When they finally hear me, they jump off the trail like I was running them down.

    I'm sort of a meek mild mannered fellow and don't like talking/shouting out loud, so I click my brake levers, coast (with the Hope I would think this is adequate), or do the "I'm in this bathroom stall" cough.

    I much prefer encounters where the other trail user is coming towards me.

    I dunno, maybe I need to go to some sort of "hiker interaction training" Like when dogs go to rattlesnake school.
    I think this is the best reason to get a bell. They seem annoying, but they do announce your presence.

    bobo (still bell-less, but I see very few hikers at 5:30am in December...)

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enel
    "I'm in this bathroom stall" cough.
    Haw haw! Aren't you supposed to tap your foot three times?

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobo_krkk_NIN
    I think this is the best reason to get a bell. They seem annoying, but they do announce your presence.
    Enel has CK hubs.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enel
    Any Lewis and or Clark remnants up there?
    I skied through the meadow were they camped on the MT/ID border.

    Headed back up for dawn patrol tomorrow.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Enel has CK hubs.
    Actually, Hope on the bike I ride most. They are louder than most bells.
    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak
    And I thought I had a bike obsession. You are at once tragic and awesome.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enel
    Actually, Hope on the bike I ride most. They are louder than most bells.
    No argument on the loudness of CK or Hope rear hubs, but I don't think that non bikers understand what the "buzz" is or the what clicking of Hope brakes is. The ding ding of a bell everyone understands.... I think. Not sure that anything makes the approach of a hiker from behind pleasant.

    bobo

  31. #31
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    As long as there's some kind of noise (and the hiker isn't deaf), that should suffice for not scaring the wits out of people by sneaking up on them from behind.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velokid1
    As long as there's some kind of noise (and the hiker isn't deaf), that should suffice for not scaring the wits out of people by sneaking up on them from behind.
    Not for deaf elderly folks.

    Not for Ipod listeners

    Not for chatty groups too busy talking/oblivious to their surroundings to notice.

    ...
    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak
    And I thought I had a bike obsession. You are at once tragic and awesome.

  33. #33
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    My bad- I thought we were talking about sensible trail users. I did use the deaf qualifier in my post because most of the people on the trail here in Preskit are older.

    Someone who doesn't hear me because they have headphones on or because they're talking too loudly to hear things around them don't get any sympathy from me. I wouldn't feel bad about scaring them.

    However, I gotta say... I don't know if I've ever come upon a hiker with an iPod. Usually the person I scare is just someone who's older and too hard of hearing to notice the crunching of my knobbies on the dirt... so by the time I say, "Good morning" I'm right behind them and I can almost hear them squirting into their Depends a little.

    Never had anyone get upset about it. They always giggle at themselves for startling so easy.

    Wow, we really dissect things around here, don't we?

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velokid1
    Wow, we really dissect things around here, don't we?
    Here's one for you: What about the hiker who refuses to get out of your way? I can think of a couple times when a hiker has flat out refused to let me by. In both cases, I was almost forced to give them a shoulder bump as I rode by them.

    However, probably the best for me was a cyclocrosser who was carrying his bike down a short, steep climb that I was ascending. Not only did he not get out of the way, but as he was running, he swung his rear tire into me (it was accidently, but still I was not a happy camper).

    I totally agree with you on the ipod thing. If they can't hear me, I dont' feel the slighest bad about starteling them.
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  35. #35
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    Hell they'll hear a bell and think its a cat .

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velokid1
    Usually the person I scare is just someone who's older and too hard of hearing to notice the crunching of my knobbies on the dirt... so by the time I say, "Good morning" I'm right behind them and I can almost hear them squirting into their Depends a little.
    LOL. Had that happen many a time.
    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak
    And I thought I had a bike obsession. You are at once tragic and awesome.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinny-tire
    Here's one for you: What about the hiker who refuses to get out of your way? I can think of a couple times when a hiker has flat out refused to let me by. In both cases, I was almost forced to give them a shoulder bump as I rode by them.

    However, probably the best for me was a cyclocrosser who was carrying his bike down a short, steep climb that I was ascending. Not only did he not get out of the way, but as he was running, he swung his rear tire into me (it was accidently, but still I was not a happy camper).

    I totally agree with you on the ipod thing. If they can't hear me, I dont' feel the slighest bad about starteling them.
    Well, hikers get the right of way. Shouldering your way past one, even if (s)he's deliberately ignoring you, is pretty uncool.

    Agreed on the ipod thing. It's their responsibility to be aware of their surroundings.

    p.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul B
    Well, hikers get the right of way. Shouldering your way past one, even if (s)he's deliberately ignoring you, is pretty uncool.

    Agreed on the ipod thing. It's their responsibility to be aware of their surroundings.

    p.
    Let me clarify: we were going the same direction. I suppose I could have gotten off and walked past, but they definitely were not letting me by on purpose, and they made it perfectly clear (including on one case talking under her breath that she was not going to step aside).

    If we are coming from opposite direction, I always stop and let them by if they don't step aside.
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul B
    Well, hikers get the right of way. Shouldering your way past one, even if (s)he's deliberately ignoring you, is pretty uncool.

    Agreed on the ipod thing. It's their responsibility to be aware of their surroundings.

    p.

    i have to disagree. If someone is not sharing the trail, you should be a little assertive. Now before i do that, I make sure i give them several polite warnings and I say as I'm pushing by them "share the trail, please."

    FWIW, most hikers that I come up on who do not hear me are usually pretty cool when i scare them. i make a point of saying something like "sorry to surprise you, I called but you didn't hear me, thanks have a nice day." Its possible to have the "less than ideal" interaction and still be civil and get your point across.

  40. #40
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    I'm so glad we don't have the same trail congestion up here. I have a feeling I wouldn't be nearly as pleasant if I were constantly battling other trail users the way you folks in the Valley have to.

    The hiker who wouldn't move over: Wonder how long she'd tolerate you quietly walking your bike behind her. 5 minutes? An hour? Would be fun to find out.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velokid1
    I'm so glad we don't have the same trail congestion up here. I have a feeling I wouldn't be nearly as pleasant if I were constantly battling other trail users the way you folks in the Valley have to.

    The hiker who wouldn't move over: Wonder how long she'd tolerate you quietly walking your bike behind her. 5 minutes? An hour? Would be fun to find out.
    its really not that bad...most people are out to just have a great day and if you go to Somo etc. on the weekends you just dial your attitude into that. it is crowded sometimes, but its also more social. You get back what you give out - be nice, and you almost never have problems, the idiots get left in your dust before you know it.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Velokid1
    I'm so glad we don't have the same trail congestion up here. I have a feeling I wouldn't be nearly as pleasant if I were constantly battling other trail users the way you folks in the Valley have to.

    The hiker who wouldn't move over: Wonder how long she'd tolerate you quietly walking your bike behind her. 5 minutes? An hour? Would be fun to find out.
    That would have been a great idea. I'll have to remember that if it ever happens to me again.

    During peak hours, I try and ride trails I know are a bit off the beaten path. Of course, I still get a bit peeved when the hikers "discover" those trails. I'm all for multiuse trails (and I would never suggest biking only trails), but when I'm in a "mood," I do get a bit frustrated when I have to get out of rhythm to wait for a hiker. (Of course, if I go on a hike, I hate having to give all those damn bikers room to go by too!!!!! Some days, you just can't please me.)
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

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