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  1. #1
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    Reputation: dtownmtb's Avatar
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    Water purifiers/filters

    I'd like to expand my riding range beyond the length of a camelback and water bottles. That means getting water from local sources. So, I need to acquire a method to make that water safe to drink.

    I know there are a lot of bikepackers and endurance riders out there who have used this type of equipment and I'd love to hear your opinions/suggestions.

    I'd prefer to buy only one device as my budget is not large and would prefer to carry as little as possible.

    Given the choice which is better, filter or purifier? Opinions and suggestions would be appreciated.

  2. #2
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    The one on my list is the Katadyn Vario. Can even fill right into the camelbak hose.

  3. #3
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    I have had several light weight filters over the years this is the one I have now. http://cascadedesigns.com/msr/water-...filter/product

    Lots of Ultra racers like to go light and just use tabs, I prefer to filter out the floaties.
    Singin' I love hike a bike!!!

  4. #4
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    Reputation: dtownmtb's Avatar
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    Looks like both of these filters take care of Bacteria - so you wouldn't need tablets in addition - is that correct?

    How about the Steripen? A couple of people have recommended those. It appears that it will still allow a fair amount of suspended particles but it appears that it would make the water safe to drink.

  5. #5
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    Correct the filter eliminates the need for any further treatment.

    Steripen does the same but leaves you with more particulate.

    Your still limited in terms of longer rides with a water treatment plan you can ride farther but only in places that have water sources.

    The other option is coming up with ways to carry more water. Larger pack second bladder, frame bag for the second bladder is a nice option.

    For bikepacking I carry 2 bladders 3 liters each and a one liter bottle on the bike. I have a small frame bag the bladder will only hold about 2 liters and fit in the bag. I also have room for 2 bladders in the bladder section of the Osprey Talon pack I use. Depending on how much I need to carry I'll either put the bladder in the frame bag with 2 liters or fill it and put it in the pack. Having a 6 to 7 liter capacity will take you a long ways.

    Having the filter allows me to carry less weight in areas that have more ground water available.
    Singin' I love hike a bike!!!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZTtripper View Post
    I have had several light weight filters over the years this is the one I have now. http://cascadedesigns.com/msr/water-...filter/product

    Lots of Ultra racers like to go light and just use tabs, I prefer to filter out the floaties.

    That looks like a good option. Bookmarked. I am less concerned about what I can see and more about what I cannot see, like Cryptosporidium and Giardia spores or other microbes. I believe the CDC says sub-micron filters will do that, so that one at 0.2 u should be great and should even get most little critters.

  7. #7
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    I use the gravity bag filter from rei
    it's ziptied to my bars for. hot or long rides. I hated all that pumping with my old filter

  8. #8
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    +1 for the Katadyn Vario very easy to operate/maintain great price/value they make a version w/ ceramic filter that is a bit more compact but$$$ ....

  9. #9
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    Cartridge filter with MSR or Katadyn for sure. I picked up a Steripen for a recent trip to Hellsgate because I was tired of paying $40 for replacement paper filters on my old school Katadyn Hiker Pro. The batteries took a sh*t on day 4 and I was back to old faithful that I had my buddy haul with him as back up.
    On two seperate trips to REI the staff talked Steripen up like it was a no brainer. Mine is going back in exchange for a porcelain cartridge filter... I had a couple other knocks on it as well. But I'll spare them.
    There are some cool in-line filters that allow you to simply fill your bladder and filter while your sucking the water through the line. Cool option.

  10. #10
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    Lots of options they all have pro's and con's. Ceramic is the great for getting every little thing but they are heavy compared to paper. Paper is light but as Treky said they only last so long. The inline system would be cool if all of the water you drink needs to be filtered but once you put dirty water in the bladder you have no option not to use the filter, that seems like over kill. The thing I like about the Hyperflow is that it has a back flush setup that help add life to the filter. The new style of intake filter seems to work really well also.
    Singin' I love hike a bike!!!

  11. #11
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    I use the Katadyn Micropur Purification Tablets. And rely highly on the drink and pray method. Particulates and dirt doesn't scare me much.

  12. #12
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    I am not really afraid of the floaties but when the water is going into my bladder I would rather it be clean. Not that I ever clean the bladder itself.

    Another good option for those who only use it sparingly would be one of the top of the bottle style filters. You can always just drink out of the bottle itself or use the bottle to fill the bladder.

    If you go with tabs make sure you know how long you need to wait after adding them.
    Singin' I love hike a bike!!!

  13. #13
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    Filters can remove protozoa and cysts, including bacteria, but they cannot remove viruses. Viruses must be killed through sterillization i.e. steripen, chlorine/iodine tablets, boiling. Sterillization will also take care of the protozoa and cysts, but will leave particulates behind. If the murky water and floaties doesn't bother you, just get something to sterilize and save yourself some weight. If you want to be completely safe, and get rid of the particles, you will need a filter and sterillizer. I just use a filter and have never been sick from the water i've filtered.

  14. #14
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    I carry a Steripen and coffee filter to catch the particulate before I zap it with the Steripen. I haven't had an issue yet. It's light and does the trick for me.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by eringel View Post
    I carry a Steripen and coffee filter to catch the particulate before I zap it with the Steripen. I haven't had an issue yet. It's light and does the trick for me.
    I have a bad neck (deg. discs) and do not like to carry a Camelback, so it's usually two Polar bottles for me. As long as the ride is completed in a decent time frame I'm okay, but I've had to borrow a splash or two from my fellow riders lately. I tried a hip pack a few years back, but with food an tools in it I had to cinch it so tight it would cause cramps in my upper thigh on extended rides.

    I just picked up a Steripen and will try your idea of the coffee filter for screening out the 'floaties'. How long have you had your Steripen and have you experienced any of the battery or other issues some of the other posts indicate? Thanks in adv.
    It's not how good you look......it's how well you ride !

  16. #16
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    I am not one who needs a filter but I do carry tabs just in case.

    My buddy who lives in Crested Butte is an avid outdoors-man. He guides white water raft trips, travels all over South America and Hawaii camping and whatnot. He tells me some water, like in the Green River (or Colorado maybe) cannot be filtered as it simply clogs up the filters. You can let it sit for a while, letting the sediment settle before filtering but he says it's still not very feasible.

    Just something to think about for some locales.

  17. #17
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    I honesty haven't had any battery problems, but it's something to be aware of I guess. You can always carry a couple extra batteries...it still doesn't seem to add up to a lot of extra weight and the piece of mind might be worth it. Like I said, the setup with the coffee filter and the Steripen has been great for me.

  18. #18
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    +1 on using a gravity filter. Very light and minimal maintenance. I have the Platypus one and it will filter 4 liters in a couple minutes and I don't have to do anything. You can even use the system as your bladder. But the zipper on the platypus isn't very good. The MSR version might be better for hauling water.

  19. #19
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    Ive never needed any purification on bike rides, but when I go hunting I carry tabs and some small powdery drink mixture. I prefer EmergenC or Zipfizz, covers the taste and adds a little pick-me-up. Stick it all in the Camelbak bladder and good to go.
    Flying the HiFi...Clyde style.


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  20. #20
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    I had rainwater tank at my home and now I am here wondering for water filters of reasonable price and of high quality. Can anyone have idea from where I can buy water filter.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZTtripper View Post
    I have had several light weight filters over the years this is the one I have now. http://cascadedesigns.com/msr/water-...filter/product

    Lots of Ultra racers like to go light and just use tabs, I prefer to filter out the floaties.
    I've been using the Katydn Hike Pro for years and it's cheap and relaibile but not this small.....may be time to upgrade....
    This is just need to know information: Am i supposed to enjoy the irony or pity the sincerity?

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by YuriB View Post
    I've been using the Katydn Hike Pro for years and it's cheap and relaibile but not this small.....may be time to upgrade....
    Yuri

    I used the hiker pro for years also, the HyperFlow is real upgrade. A buddy of mine bought one last year for the Apache 200 in a side by side test the HyperFlow won hands down.

    Quote Originally Posted by robinkipson View Post
    I had rainwater tank at my home and now I am here wondering for water filters of reasonable price and of high quality. Can anyone have idea from where I can buy water filter.
    If the water is reasonably clean to begin with just boil it for 2 minutes and that will kill anything that will likely make you sick.

    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride View Post
    I am not one who needs a filter but I do carry tabs just in case.

    My buddy who lives in Crested Butte is an avid outdoors-man. He guides white water raft trips, travels all over South America and Hawaii camping and whatnot. He tells me some water, like in the Green River (or Colorado maybe) cannot be filtered as it simply clogs up the filters. You can let it sit for a while, letting the sediment settle before filtering but he says it's still not very feasible.

    Just something to think about for some locales.
    I have done a fair bit of rafting as well major fun times.

    I got to do a month long Grand Canyon trip in 08. For making coffee we used the river water every day. Fill a 5 gallon bucket to let it settle out overnight and then boil for 2 min.

    Another thing to remember is that it's better to drink unfiltered water then to get dehydrated. So if you are out in the field and what ever system you are using fails don't be afraid to drink. It's better to end up sick at home then to become disabled in the backcountry. And there is always the possibility that nothing will come of it anyway.
    Last edited by AZTtripper; 06-30-2011 at 09:05 AM.
    Singin' I love hike a bike!!!

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