Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 27
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    13

    Tried Clipless for the first time

    So, after years of platforms i finally broke down and joined the 21st century and bought some crank brothers mallets and some 510's. I dont always crash, but when i do, it is in spetacular fashion and i did just that tonight out at FINS. 3 times in fact! How long does it typically take to learn to unclip? i have them on the 15 degree release.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Eazy_E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,430
    First, you practice on the grass.

    Second, I'm a big fan of Shimano SPD pedals with M multi release cleats. They'll release inboard, outboard, or with a good tug up.

  3. #3
    Go Speed Racer
    Reputation: mtbdennis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,084
    Sounds like me, I just put the flats back on and never looked back.

  4. #4
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    19,178
    Quote Originally Posted by Eazy_E View Post
    First, you practice on the grass.
    .
    This.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    13
    I did awesome riding around on the street, sidewalk etc. and really on 90% of the trail. its just the 10% that i was on my head that i am concerned with. i think i might be running too tall of a gear and get hung up too easily. Oh well, gotta keep trying. never going to get better if i dont try new things. Thanks for the input

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    644
    Quote Originally Posted by Eazy_E View Post
    First, you practice on the grass.

    Second, I'm a big fan of Shimano SPD pedals with M multi release cleats. They'll release inboard, outboard, or with a good tug up.
    QFT!!!

    Also your pedals should have an adjustment so you can make the clip looser or tighter. If you loosen it up, you can break free a little easier. As I'm currently getting used to clipless, I have the multi release cleats and the adjustment is backed way out. Enough that it will keep my foot locked in on a hard bump, but loose enough that any panic mode and my foot is out.
    And one thing I learned the hard way, make sure the screws holding the cleats don't come loose. My left shoe did (before I had the multi's on) and I fell over 3 different times trying to get unclipped. Once I figured that out (and switched to the multi's) I used some lock tight and more torque then the instructions call for, to make sure they don't back out again.
    2012 Rockhopper 29er.

  7. #7
    Angry SingleSpeeder
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    34
    you need to practice. go to a nice grass area and fall on purpose. you need to ingrain in your mind that "oh no, I "may" be falling" = twist out.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    385
    Quote Originally Posted by joshh View Post
    QFT!!!

    Also your pedals should have an adjustment so you can make the clip looser or tighter. If you loosen it up, you can break free a little easier. As I'm currently getting used to clipless, I have the multi release cleats and the adjustment is backed way out. Enough that it will keep my foot locked in on a hard bump, but loose enough that any panic mode and my foot is out.
    And one thing I learned the hard way, make sure the screws holding the cleats don't come loose. My left shoe did (before I had the multi's on) and I fell over 3 different times trying to get unclipped. Once I figured that out (and switched to the multi's) I used some lock tight and more torque then the instructions call for, to make sure they don't back out again.
    Crankbrothers pedals do not adjust in this fashion. You have two options, 15˙ or 20˙.







    It takes a little while to break in the pedal. After a few rides it gets easier to get out of the Mallets. The good news is, you can unclip and ride it like a platform on the sketchy stuff. There are some rides (going up Lower National) were I never clip it in. It's nice to have both options.

    Good Luck
    Evan

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: az3075's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    73
    I've been using clipless for over a year now... at first I would fall about once a week, then once a month... all at very, very low speeds, usually at very sharp switchbacks.... Now I rarely fall, mostly because I've gotten better at the switchbacks and I don't think about the pedals anymore.. they just release naturally. I even had a nasty fall once when the front wheel slid out from underneath me and they released just fine. Fact that they're broken in and realease easily helps too. I wonder if maybe a used set of pedals/clips would help with training??? I used both SPD and eggbeaters on 2 different bikes for a while and found the eggbeaters are easier to get in and out of.

  10. #10
    SamuraiBunnyGuy
    Reputation: longhairmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    2,370
    do you guys normally replace your pedals every year? im wondering where you draw the line at WEAR and consider them too bashed up to be safe

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: metalaficionado's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1,536
    OP, why do you need to clipped in anyway? Are your racing for money? Do you friends make fun of you for riding flats or do you just want to challenge yourself?

    Loosen them up all the way and make sure you keep everything lubed for smooth unclipping. Practice unclipping multiple times before each ride...

    Remember when snowboarding was cool? I used to be a great skier, then I switched to snowboarding b/c was the thing to do in the late 90's. Now I am going back to skis again, wondering why I did waste my time snowboarding all this time. It's kind of like that with clipless, when I was kid/teenager I rode flats - then switched to clipless - rode for 10 years and went back to flats again - wondering why did fall for clip fad anyway.

    MORAL: Don't fall for fads....

    Which reminds me, I am totally all over those new 27.5 bikes that are coming out !

  12. #12
    Angry SingleSpeeder
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    34
    ^hahahaha^

    I like not having to worry about my feet placement. i know that when I am clipped in, my feet are in the best position when I hit the trail. Haven't fell "Yet." but you can fall even with flats.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: metalaficionado's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1,536
    you can fall on a tricycle

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JoePAz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,101
    Quote Originally Posted by JM27 View Post
    So, after years of platforms i finally broke down and joined the 21st century and bought some crank brothers mallets and some 510's. I dont always crash, but when i do, it is in spectacular fashion and i did just that tonight out at FINS. 3 times in fact! How long does it typically take to learn to unclip? i have them on the 15 degree release.
    4-5 rides at least. Just about everyone I know had a fall fest on their first clipless ride. A good friend did is first ride in the Usery's on clipless and fell 7-8 times. In plants & cactus, all over. In fact he tells me this story about how he fell (could not release) in plant and had his bike stuck him. Some kid hiker comes by and says "Hey Mister, are you ok?" In the way only a snotty 10 year old can. Funnny stuff, but other than a few srapes he was fine and has been riding clipless for the past 12+ years.
    Joe
    2003 KHS Alite 4000 26" Hardtail - XC, All mountain, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: JoePAz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,101
    Quote Originally Posted by longhairmike View Post
    do you guys normally replace your pedals every year? im wondering where you draw the line at WEAR and consider them too bashed up to be safe
    When they don't work. My SPD's have taken a beating over many years of riding. No need to replace them. Now if bearings start going or they fail to work, but other than those clear issues they don't need to be replaced.

    BTW... New pedals need some break in time. I put new SPD road pedals on my road bike and use the same MTB shoes and cleats. These were much tighter than my mtn pedals especially right out of the box and despite adjusting tension. However once I popped in a out a few times they started to break in and were much better.

    So any new pedal will need a number of clip and release cycles to get everything moving properly.
    Joe
    2003 KHS Alite 4000 26" Hardtail - XC, All mountain, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Eazy_E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    1,430
    Quote Originally Posted by longhairmike View Post
    do you guys normally replace your pedals every year? im wondering where you draw the line at WEAR and consider them too bashed up to be safe
    My Shimano M520s look like absolute hell, but they still work like new. If you strike a rock, the bottom edge of the pedal has the spring in the rear so the spring deflects and absorbs a lot of the impact.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    644
    Quote Originally Posted by aevanlloyd View Post
    Crankbrothers pedals do not adjust in this fashion. You have two options, 15˙ or 20˙.
    Good Luck
    Evan
    My bad. I assumed that was a standard clipless thing, cuz well I still don't know much about em.
    2012 Rockhopper 29er.

  18. #18
    undercover brother
    Reputation: tangaroo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    873
    Quote Originally Posted by metalaficionado View Post
    OP, why do you need to clipped in anyway? Are your racing for money? Do you friends make fun of you for riding flats or do you just want to challenge yourself?

    Loosen them up all the way and make sure you keep everything lubed for smooth unclipping. Practice unclipping multiple times before each ride...

    Remember when snowboarding was cool? I used to be a great skier, then I switched to snowboarding b/c was the thing to do in the late 90's. Now I am going back to skis again, wondering why I did waste my time snowboarding all this time. It's kind of like that with clipless, when I was kid/teenager I rode flats - then switched to clipless - rode for 10 years and went back to flats again - wondering why did fall for clip fad anyway.

    MORAL: Don't fall for fads....

    Which reminds me, I am totally all over those new 27.5 bikes that are coming out !

    Clipless is not a fad... its been around for +15 years. You should ride both IMO.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MtbAZ44's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1,378
    yeah, I have been using SPD's since 1993 (or about then)... I used my original pedals for about 10 years and didn't replace them every year... that's odd to hear persons replacing them every year.. The shimano design is much better for getting in/out now, so I bought some new pedals.. Also have the same spd pedals on my road bike...

    I just find it much more comfortable to ride with spd... Its whatever you are used to and comfortable with...

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    219
    Quote Originally Posted by aevanlloyd View Post
    Crankbrothers pedals do not adjust in this fashion. You have two options, 15˙ or 20˙.







    It takes a little while to break in the pedal. After a few rides it gets easier to get out of the Mallets. The good news is, you can unclip and ride it like a platform on the sketchy stuff. There are some rides (going up Lower National) were I never clip it in. It's nice to have both options.

    Good Luck
    Evan
    Hey Evan,
    I am considering the same setup as you and the OP. Crank Brothers Mallet 2 and the 5.10 Maltese Falcons. I really ride primarily XC and I like trying rocky, technical climbs here in Colorado. I just can't get used to clipless for that so I chicken out and riding isn't as fun as it used to be. Are the Mallets really good for being able to use unclipped? I don't want to accidentally clip in right when I am ready to bail.

    Could you adjust the pins up high on one side that you don't clip in on, and really lower the pins on the clip side?

    Thanks for your help!

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: metalaficionado's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1,536
    Quote Originally Posted by tangaroo View Post
    Clipless is not a fad... its been around for +15 years. You should ride both IMO.
    Once I get my all mountain bike, I am planning to have flats on that and return to clipless on the XC bike.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    385
    Quote Originally Posted by Venturewest View Post
    Hey Evan,
    I am considering the same setup as you and the OP. Crank Brothers Mallet 2 and the 5.10 Maltese Falcons. I really ride primarily XC and I like trying rocky, technical climbs here in Colorado. I just can't get used to clipless for that so I chicken out and riding isn't as fun as it used to be. Are the Mallets really good for being able to use unclipped? I don't want to accidentally clip in right when I am ready to bail.

    Could you adjust the pins up high on one side that you don't clip in on, and really lower the pins on the clip side?

    Thanks for your help!
    I too ride primarily XC, but in AZ that turns in to AM/DH real fast. I like the Mallet because it gives me both options of being clipped in or being free. When I am on a new trail or if I am unsure if I can clean a section, I simply unclip a few seconds before I hit the section and ride it like I was on platforms. I was in Utah riding the Gooseberry trails which is fairly technical and primarily on a rock surface. I rode the whole weekend unclipped. I had no desire to chance it on anything. Many of the guys I was riding with had "tip overs" but I was able to put a foot down when I needed to. Having options is nice.

    As for as the pins go, when I first installed the pedals, I raised the pins as high as they would go. This is very grippy when pedaling unclipped, however when clipped in, it is very difficult to get out of the pedal, because the pins prevent your foot from rotating. Now I have the pins fairly flush with the pedal, with maybe 2-3 rotations from rock bottom.

    Also note that with the Mallet, your foot is never fully flat on the pedal(when unclipped) because the eggbeater is raised. (see photo above) This can give you a loose feeling that you may or may not like. It is diminished by raising the pins, but that has its drawbacks as earlier noted.

    In the end, I like the combo. It works for me and my style of riding. That said, I can see how some people might hate it. If possible, demo some and see what you think.

    Oh. . . try to get as light a 5.10 shoe as possible. Mine are the Hellcats and they are quite heavy. Too heavy.

    Good luck.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    48
    Love clipless on the road but on the trail the scare the S--t out of me. Rode the FINS with clipless and was afraid to do some basic rides on the cliff runs. bought some platforms and rode Fins the next week and had a blast. Alot more confidence and was able to ride harder trails due to not fearing being locked to the bike. Now I switch from clipless to platform when I ride the trail and exercise on the road.

    Only have the one bike for both activities because I am poor but have fun anyway.

  24. #24
    Control Freak
    Reputation: hatedg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    326
    Flats forever! Clips in spin class I have spoken! Now be gone!

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BCTJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    699
    If you're going to ride clipless, just be sure you're able to clip out before something like this happens to you.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tried Clipless for the first time-glove.jpg  


Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •