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  1. #1
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    Reccomend a bike for AZ Trails??

    Hello,

    I am very new to mountain biking, a good friend of mine is really in to it. And right now I am looking to just pick up a bike, to ride with him on trails around my house (I live on Crismonm in Mesa) so I'm close to Usery & Dawes I think. I was planning on getting a hardtail at first to see if I'm even interested in mountain biking before dropping alot of cash on a full suspension. I was thinking about getting a Specialized Rockhopper, and was just curious if this would do good on the trails around my house?? Eventually as I get more experince and I would want to move up to advanced trails etc... Is this a good place to start?? I'd like to stay around $600 for a bike, can I get anything decent to begin on?? If the Rockhopper isn't good for around here, is there anything someone can reccomend?? Thanks for the help. I figure lots of people here know the trails and probably have some gear advice!

    Rob

  2. #2
    Dawn to Dust MTB Club
    Reputation: mtnbike1971's Avatar
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    My 1st ride was a Rockhopper, great bike, loved her! IMO it's great choice for a beginner ride. Plus learning to ride on a hard tail will help fine tune your skills when you graduate to a full suspension.

  3. #3
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    Rockhoppers are good. Just make sure it has a decent front fork.

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  5. #5
    Wait, what!?
    Reputation: Enduroblood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheTrux
    Rockhoppers are good. Just make sure it has a decent front fork.
    Agreed. I dont know what the 2008 comes with, but I wasnt a fan on the 07 Dart 3. Great bike

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the feedback!! I'm also thinking about looking at the Mongoose 707, its a FS but its only $800, which is only $200 more then I planned on spending, I've also heard Ibex does some very reasonable FS bikes. Was curious if I should just go with one of these FS bikes or stick to the hardtail?? Any advice, as I am un-sure!

  7. #7
    Not a Barry supporter.
    Reputation: Crash_FLMB's Avatar
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    First, welcome to the sport! Second, I have a close friend that rides a Rockhopper and loves it. The only negative thing I've heard about them is the front fork sometimes is a little flexy. I'm sure you'd be happy with it. Don't forget that great deals on used bikes can be had too. You have to know what you're looking at so bring you're friend along who knows about bikes to ensure a good deal.

    I've had all kinds of bikes with all kinds of suspension and everyone is different. I prefer a steel HT to a FS. I also ride a 29er SS. Not a bad idea to look at the Redline Monocog
    29er. Several people ride them and seem to like them. They're reasonable priced too.

    Good luck and once you're more comfortable on the bike and technical trails, come out to a group ride. Check out the C group rides as there are many rides in that 'group' who are great to hang and ride with.
    Why would I need more than one gear?
    @A_SingleSpeeder
    EPA = crooks!

  8. #8
    Too many Sedonuts...
    Reputation: CactusJoe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdark1
    Thanks for the feedback!! I'm also thinking about looking at the Mongoose 707, its a FS but its only $800, which is only $200 more then I planned on spending, I've also heard Ibex does some very reasonable FS bikes. Was curious if I should just go with one of these FS bikes or stick to the hardtail?? Any advice, as I am un-sure!
    How tall are you? I'll bet there's more than one person on the forum that would let you demo one of their rides.

    Also, check with Slippery Pig bike shop and ask about a demo. They have a few that you could take out on T100, just to check out.

    -JB
    When the world slips you a Jeffrey, stroke the furry wall.

  9. #9
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    With the budget you listed, stick to a hardtail.
    You will get far more for your money in terms of components and design with a hardtail.
    Quote Originally Posted by azdog View Post
    I think he was born around the time of the Chernobyl fallout which would explain a lot.

  10. #10
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    Yea i think im like the fourth to say it but my first bike was also a rockhopper, and az cyclery has demos to take white tanks, you can take them out on your own or there are group rides every wedsday morning very friendly people and a good way to learn is riding with others.

  11. #11
    parenting for gnarness
    Reputation: chollaball's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdark1
    Hello,

    I am very new to mountain biking, a good friend of mine is really in to it. And right now I am looking to just pick up a bike, to ride with him on trails around my house (I live on Crismonm in Mesa) so I'm close to Usery & Dawes I think. I was planning on getting a hardtail at first to see if I'm even interested in mountain biking before dropping alot of cash on a full suspension. I was thinking about getting a Specialized Rockhopper, and was just curious if this would do good on the trails around my house?? Eventually as I get more experince and I would want to move up to advanced trails etc... Is this a good place to start?? I'd like to stay around $600 for a bike, can I get anything decent to begin on?? If the Rockhopper isn't good for around here, is there anything someone can reccomend?? Thanks for the help. I figure lots of people here know the trails and probably have some gear advice!

    Rob
    Usery and Hawes both have lots for a beginner but also things to grow on. A hardtail will be fine on most of those trails. If you find yourself on the harder sections of those trails, you've probably gotten to be a much better rider and will want to re-evaluate your bike at that time anyway. Sampling affordably is a good plan if you are not sure how much you'll enjoy the sport. have fun!

  12. #12
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    Hello and Welcome,
    I just wanted to let you know that this 55 yr old rode a Trek 820 HardTail($200) for over 1800 miles and rode everything from the DC to Pemberton to Hawes... I now own an Ironhorse Maverick XC FullSuspension($400@Preformance) that I've logged over 950 miles on. Sweet ride for the money and not too much to sell it off if you don't enjoy riding. Good Luck... you don't have to break the bank.

  13. #13
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    No Need to break the bank...

    Hello and welcome,
    I just wanted to let you know that this 55 yr old rode a Trek 820 ($200) HT for over 1800 miles and rode everything from the DC to Pemberton to Hawes. I now own an Ironhorse Maverick XC FS($400@Performance) that has over 950 miles on it. Love Disc brakes. A sweet ride for the money and not too much to sell if you don't like riding. Good luck and keep the rubber side down. Remember you don't have to break the bank... you'll need other equipment too.

  14. #14
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    No Need to break the bank...

    Hello and welcome,
    I just wanted to let you know that this 55 yr old rode a Trek 820 ($200) HT for over 1800 miles and rode everything from the DC to Pemberton to Hawes. I now own an Ironhorse Maverick XC FS($400@Performance) that has over 950 miles on it. Love Disc brakes. A sweet ride for the money and not too much to sell if you don't like riding. Good luck and keep the rubber side down. Remember you don't have to break the bank... you'll need other equipment too.

  15. #15
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    You don't have to break the bank...

    Hello and welcome,
    I just wanted to let you know that this 55 yr old rode a Trek 820 ($200) HT for over 1800 miles and rode everything from the DC to Pemberton to Hawes. I now own an Ironhorse Maverick XC FS($400@Performance) that has over 950 miles on it. Love Disc brakes. A sweet ride for the money and not too much to sell if you don't like riding. Good luck and keep the rubber side down. Remember you don't have to break the bank... you'll need other equipment too.

  16. #16
    EDR
    Reputation: eatdrinkride's Avatar
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    my first mtb was a Trek 4500 or 4900 (can't remember) hardtail I bought in '03. I rode the crap out of that bike and hit every trial on Hawes many, many times. I even made my way up and down Mormon and all of the lower South Mtn. trials on that bike. It held up just fine. After a year I realized I was hooked and I spent a big chunk of change of a full susp 4'' travel xc bike. It was a nice bike but after another year of riding and realizing that the more technical stuff like National was my true passion I ditched that bike and went for another even more expensive bike with slacker angles and more travel. This was just the natural progression for me but I'm glad I bought the $500 Trek first. I knew next to nothing about mtb'ing or if I'd even stick with it and learned a lot over the first year or two about myself and what I like to ride.

    I'd say the Rockhopper is great first bike. Go for it! Have fun!

  17. #17
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    I just bought a Rockhopper Disc a month ago. I like it a lot. It's my first MTB in about 15 years. It's fairly light compared to other bike at that price range. I would have bought used if I had seen them on Craigslist at the time. I would look into those bikes if their still available. All are great deals.

  18. #18
    just 1 more
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crash_FLMB

    I've had all kinds of bikes with all kinds of suspension and everyone is different. I prefer a steel HT to a FS. I also ride a 29er SS. Not a bad idea to look at the Redline Monocog
    29er. Several people ride them and seem to like them. They're reasonable priced too.
    A 29er SS for a newbie Might as well make it a rigid fixie too You SS9ers are loony.

    Seriously, if you find mountain biking is your thing a $600 bike will soon become your errand bike. It's all a sickness.
    bikes, guns, dogs....perfect

  19. #19
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    i agree with looking on craigslist. I got a great rocky mountain bike off there for 425, it has upgrades and is already set up for riders my size (6'3" 230lbs). make sure that you bring someone with you that knows what to look for, I picked up a giant trance(great bike but lighter then what I want) for what seemed like a great deal, after rebuilding and tuning it up plus tires it was just a good deal. and now that I found the other bike I'll just be selling the giant, or trading it for a hardtail. make sure that it has had a recent tune-up, and had the suspesion serviced. if they haven't gotten these thing taken care of then figure in that to he price of the bike because it will need to be done, also there is a good chance that it will need new tires.

    the good thing about finding a used bike in good condition is that you can upgrade the parts of it that you want to with the extra money you planned on spending. look into the reviews of the bike your looking at or ask opinions from friends or the forum, then try and find a good deal on an upgrade part. or use it as a starter bike and sell it when you upgrade.

    another thing about riding in Az is having slime in your tubes, also running puncture strips. some people swear by tubless tires with a sealant (better version of slime) just be sure to have something to help with getting less flats.

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