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  1. #1
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    Racer X or Motolite for AZ trails

    So It looks like there's going to be a new bike in my future an I was hoping to get some input from folks in the know regarding the Motolite vs the Racer X.

    Here's the situation; I've been riding a Specialized FSRXC for the last year and a half and while I like the way the bike handles the trails in general, I have two overall gripes:
    1. It weighs nearly 32 pounds.
    2. Out of the saddle climbs are pretty much a no-no due to the cheapo (and might I add "proprietary") X-fusion shock bouncing like a pogo stick.

    I am attracted to the Tituses due to the reviews I have read regarding pedaling efficiency and great handling (and that they are made right here in AZ) and am having a hard time deciding between what seems to be an XC bike and a Trail bike.

    My riding style leans mostly towards a XC style I guess and while I'm not a racer I also like to ride in 24hr events and some of my riding can be a bit technical (50 year, Starr Pass, Elephant Head for those AZ folks). Is the Racer-X ill suited to technical terrain here in AZ or long distance "epics"? Is the Motolite considerable heavier and if so, is it worth it? Which would you consider to be a better fit overall for southern AZ riding?

    Thanks,
    Jim

  2. #2
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    Based on your riding style, I would say the Racer X for sure. You may also want to look at a Trek Fuel EX as well.
    Marty

  3. #3
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    The Titus's are not made in AZ, they are made in Taiwan or China or someplace overseas (that changed a couple years ago). There are several bikes out there that will perform better, be lighter, and also more durable than the Racer-X/Motolite that are a little less expensive, such as the Fuel EX mentioned earlier, or one of the 2008 Santa Cruz offerings.

  4. #4
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    I've got a racer x 29er and love it. based on your description I'd say run with the Racer X

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by janorine
    My riding style leans mostly towards a XC style I guess and while I'm not a racer I also like to ride in 24hr events and some of my riding can be a bit technical (50 year, Starr Pass, Elephant Head for those AZ folks). Is the Racer-X ill suited to technical terrain here in AZ or long distance "epics"? Is the Motolite considerable heavier and if so, is it worth it? Which would you consider to be a better fit overall for southern AZ riding?
    I own a Titus Racer-X 100 and I've ridden it in several 24 and 12 hour XC races and various longer events and it's always been great for that sort of stuff with an all-day riding style to it. Anything more extreme, which it certainly wasn't designed for, and it runs out of suspension and one wishes it was a 5" bike.

    With this in mind I recently purchased a Pivot Mach 5 and my large size (really made in Arizona) Racer-X frame, along with a few parts, is for sale. Anyone interested should contact me off list.

    -Steve

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by tamen00
    The Titus's are not made in AZ, they are made in Taiwan or China or someplace overseas (that changed a couple years ago). There are several bikes out there that will perform better, be lighter, and also more durable than the Racer-X/Motolite that are a little less expensive, such as the Fuel EX mentioned earlier, or one of the 2008 Santa Cruz offerings.
    Actually, the Racer X, Racer X 29'er and the Moto Lite are made in Portland by SAPA. All their Ti and Ti/Carbon bikes are made in Tempe. The ML1, RX1, El Guapo and Racer X Carbon are made in Taiwan.

    Pivot's are not made in the US. They are sourced form Taiwan too.

  7. #7
    It's a Sledgehammer.
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    Just for another opinion...

    If you are not racing, then you should buy the motolite, without question.
    I am an ex-racer and I definitely prefer the rough-ability of the bigger trail bikes.
    The only solution for you is to demo some trail bikes vs. the racers....

  8. #8
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    I have owned Racer X's and Motolites. For your riding style, the ML would be more suitable. The ML can be switched to the 4" mode and would make a solid XC bike for the XC races and endurance races. The ML would be much more versatile than the Racer X. The ML is a raceable trail bike.

  9. #9
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    I have a RX 29 and agree that it's built as a race bike. It's limited in suspension and comfort and maximizes pedaling efficiency. I ride mine whenever the trail will be long and the rocks and drops minimal.

    The Motolite is much more versatile and comfortable. If you're just going to own one bike in AZ then it probably should be a 5" IMHO

  10. #10
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    Also can stay with Specialized family and look at the 2008 Stumpjumpers, lighter weight able to handle some technical ups and downs as well as be used for racing.

    The new DNA on Scottsdale and 101 is having an open house on Saturday and are a Specialized concept store. They also have the Stumpy 29er which is getting some good press on the 29er forum as well.
    Last edited by BritMtnBiker; 03-12-2008 at 12:58 PM.

  11. #11
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    I'd say get a trail bike you can still race - ML, '08 Trance, '08 EX, Stumpjumper, Hi-Fi, or similar.

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    Weights and Measures

    OK good info here. Honestly, travel wise, I've never felt hindered by having only 4" of travel on the trails that I ride so I'm kind of curious as to what a 5" bike would ride like. Guess I need to demo both bikes like people are recommending. For those of you with a MotoLite, what is the typical weight of your bike (along with size)?

    Thanks,
    Jim

  13. #13
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    Turner

    Get a TURNER 5.5 and all your dreams will come true .

  14. #14
    It's a Sledgehammer.
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    Trail bikes range from 25 to 32 pounds.
    motolites are in the 28 lb range with stock stuff/aluminum. But they can also be made SUPER light if you have big bucks.

  15. #15
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    I would go with a Stumpjumper. Itís a cross country and mountain bike in one. I really enjoy racing it this year esp the technical sections. Also it has a better price point and warranty. My suggestion if you decide to go with the stumpjumper is to upgrade to a lighter cassette, wheelset and go tubeless.
    www.StudioDino.com
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  16. #16
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    You should go out and demo a 575 this weekend at one of the AZSF rides. I just got one and love it. I mostly ride out at starr pass and it is perfect for the terrain around here.

  17. #17
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    Pivot will also have a demo this weekend. They're supposed to pedal extremely well, plus you can compare their 4" bike with their 5" bike for a nice comparison.

    Btw, a 5" bike normally has slacker geometry and slower steering, providing more confidence/stability for technical spots, drops, jumps - that's one reason a trail rider is frequently better off with a "trail" bike than a 4" racer, regardless of how much travel they actually use. And with more confidence/ability, you'll probably start doing stuff you didn't do before which may require that last inch of travel.

    Pivot Demo Fri-Sat March 14-15

  18. #18
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    I've got a Motolite, as well as an older Quasimoto, and love Titus bikes, but with that being said, there are fans of many different bikes and frames. My advice/opinion, ride as many different ones as you can, until you find one that works for you. There is no one bike that is best, or fits/works best. Take advantage of any demo time possible. Factory demos are posted on here, including some at Fling, and some shops even. Sitting on one or riding in a parking lot is not going to be the same. Before spending the green (unless you are a Gates!), try many out.
    "May The Schwartz Be With You!"

  19. #19
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    I'd also give strong recommendation to the MotoLite.

    The Racer-X is a great bike, but it's pretty much designed for the racing-minder XC'er. Of course, it will handle just about anything you can throw at it, but it's primary deisgn is focused on one end. the MotoLite, is more of the "all mountain" type, but certainly light enough to fill in for the racer-type. Especially, as noted, you *can* adjust it to 4" of travel, but after two years of riding mine, I've only changed it once, and said "eh, cool - you can change it", I went back to 5" and haven't given it a second thought.

    The ML is a fabulous all-around bike, and after checking out many, many others in this category, this was the frame I chose, and I've not regretted it for a single moment. It is very comfortable in sketchy technical, as well as the jaunt around fun twisty (and fast) singletrack.

    As for weight, I've just finished an overhaul and preparing for some long fun rides next week in moab and Fruita... so with a refresh of Stans, a bottle cage, and computer - it clocks in at 27.5#. Yes, when I bought it I was able to not skimp on components, but clearly, it can be light enough for XC (and I'd also argue - more efficiency can come from shaving a few pounds off of the rider ;-).

    Now - a note about Titus in general. When I was in the market two year ago, it was just before M.C. left Titus - when I called them I got nice conversation, chatter, and assistance in answering my questions and help in choosing components and size for me. About six-months later, I tried to contact to get torque specs on the pivot bolts, etc.. and got no response. I (fortunately) found after hunting around their site a bit (and that information is now more readily available). Further, I contacted them to get a replacement pivot bolt, and was treated like an ignorant fool (I'm no genious by any means, but I *have* been working on my own bikes since I was about 7 years old). They would not deal with me directly, and forced me to not only go through my LBS (which at the time, we did not have a fully-contracted shop - it was just getting finalized) - and further, I could not buy the one friggin bolt I needed - I had to purchase a whole "set". So, in my mind, and especially now that Titus has sold to some other entity...

    So if just riding and enjoying a great frame is what you want, go for it...

  20. #20
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    There was a thread in here somewhere about a Titus demo at McDowell this weekend. If it is no too late then I would check that out and try both

  21. #21
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    Titus Demos

    Yeah I noticed that but it was too short of notice to arrange a trip up there (I'm in Tucson). Sabino Cycles is doing monthly demos here locally. I'm planning to catch the April one.

  22. #22
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    Yeah the Sabino Demo days are sweet. I tried my first single speed and my first 29er (same bike) at the one a few weeks ago. You may want to ask and see what they will be bringing, last time I did not see any Titus bikes.

  23. #23
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    Fox F32 120RLC

    I see that the majority of builds (on this site) utilize the fox TALAS. Has anybody experimented with the F32 120RLC? Seems like it might just be the ticket for a light, XC type build on the motolite that would still have some legs in the rough stuff. Thoughts?
    Last edited by janorine; 03-24-2008 at 03:25 PM.

  24. #24
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    I had a racer-x for 4 years and a motolite for 1.5 years with a Talas on it.

    In my opinion, the motolite felt the most balanced at the 120 setting on the talas. For some races I put the talas at 100 and the rear in the 4 inch setting but the bike did not feel as good as when set at 120 and 5.

    After messing around in 4 inch mode on the rear I went back to the 5 inch setting on the rear and would adjust the fox rp23 based on the course/conditions and never went back to the 4 inch setting.

    The talas gives you so much versatility, in 100 it climbs better, and in 140 it descends better and 120 does great on everything. I see no good reason not to have that, and having just 100 will limit that bike in my opinion.

    Good luck,

  25. #25
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    Edited

    Oops, my Bad. I meant the 120RLC. The 100 would be a waste in a 5" bike.

  26. #26
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    Yeah...just 120 is a different story.

    Universal Cycles shows that the talas weighs .5 llbs more and costs $60 more.

    I rode 98% of the time with my talas in 120, only changing for long uphill or downhill sections. So yes, you certainly would be fine with a fox 120 and not lose much.

    That being said, I would still go with the talas as that weight penalty is not that much.

  27. #27
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    I have a custom Ti Racer-X that Chris designed for me back in the day. He designed it around a Marzochi 100 fork, which at the time, was a tall fork for a Racer-X. There is very little that I can't ride this bike on, and much of what I can't ride, is my fault, not the bike. At the time I had my Racer-X built, there was no Motolite, but there was a Switchblade. I like the Switch going downhill, but it felt like a pig going up hill, so I got the Racer-X and decided I needed to improve my skills on the downhill. To the extent that's possible, I think I've done that.

    For example, riding National, is really no big deal. Chris designed the Racer-X riding National almost daily. It's a very durable bike. Riding Holbert, however, it's not designed to do. A Racer-X isn't a bike that's designed to be hucked off things, but rather, ridden primarily with both wheels touching the ground.

    This last weekend, I rode with a former Titus employee that has a Racer-X and a Motolite. He brought his Motolite to the ride, that honestly, a hardtail would have been just aas aptly suited for. He claims he can climb better on his Motolite than his Racer-X. I dunno, but that was a pretty strong endorsement to me, of just how versatile a Motolite really is.

    This former Titus employee, however, is now a Pivot employee. His next bike is going to be the Pivot 5. I think if I ever get a new bike, it'll also be a Pivot 5. As far as I can tell, it's everything the Motolite is, plus a few extra bits of juiciness thrown in.

    I also like the Turner 5 spot. I think all 3 of those bikes would make me happy, but I suspect the Pivot 5 would make me the happiest.

    As far as forks go, honestly, of all of the forks I've run, having a true coil fork has given me the best quality ride. I'd be looking very hard at a Fox Vanilla. The need for adjustable heights with an air fork on a trail bike...bah! Just go coil.

  28. #28
    I bike, I brew
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    A friend of mine has the 120RLC on his new bike - while not the MotoLite, I can say he's been totally pleased with its performance, especially after a week at Fruita and Moab. He previously had the Fox Terra-Logic (inertia valve), and is so pleased with the RLC over the inertia valve that he just couldn't stop smiling.

  29. #29
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    Racer X and Motolite frames are made by Sapa in Oregon. If you buy a complete bike it's made in Taiwan.

  30. #30
    It's a Sledgehammer.
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    I just demod the pivot too, the bike is perfection. in the motolite sense.

    Are the pivots made right here in Tempe? The pivot office/shop is located right next door to my office, I guess Ishould walk over there and check it out

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