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  1. #1
    SamuraiBunnyGuy
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    questions on replacing just chainrings on a 3x9 crankset

    so far the only things i've changed on my bike in nearly 2 and a half years is tires (frequently), brake pads (several times) cassette (within last 12 months) and chain(2 months ago)
    I'm starting to get more frequent chain slipping on climbs and im pretty sure its just the chainring teeth getting worn down and not biting the chain as well.
    I dont think i need to replace the entire crankset, but it looks like i can get 3 new evolve chainrings for about $60. i can also opt for 22/32/bash for the same price.
    couldn't i just adjust the hi-screw on my front-der to lock out the range of the upper chainring without getting a 2x9 specific derailleur, or is there more to it than that?

    do most of you go thru a few sets of chainrings before replacing the entire crankset? i don't ride nearly enough to destroy components in a single year, but i got this bike only a few weeks after moving to AZ, so i really dont have my own basis for a replacement times other than the stuff that wears out super-fast.

    questions on replacing just chainrings on a 3x9 crankset-dscn3858.jpg

    i was also wondering how important rear-der pully teeth are to functionality, as mine are quite rounded. i will likely just get a new derailleur eventually. i had a brand new spare XTR one but i found out i cant use it because it is a rapid-rise and would completely reverse my gears

    questions on replacing just chainrings on a 3x9 crankset-dscn3862.jpg

    and no,, i have never removed my cranks or dereailleur.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
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    Yes, you can do this... I have done it on my bike. Sorry, that is the only one of your questions that I have the answer to

    Quote Originally Posted by longhairmike View Post
    couldn't i just adjust the hi-screw on my front-der to lock out the range of the upper chainring without getting a 2x9 specific derailleur, or is there more to it than that?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by longhairmike View Post
    so far the only things i've changed on my bike in nearly 2 and a half years is tires (frequently), brake pads (several times) cassette (within last 12 months) and chain(2 months ago)
    I'm starting to get more frequent chain slipping on climbs and im pretty sure its just the chainring teeth getting worn down and not biting the chain as well.
    I dont think i need to replace the entire crankset, but it looks like i can get 3 new evolve chainrings for about $60. i can also opt for 22/32/bash for the same price.
    couldn't i just adjust the hi-screw on my front-der to lock out the range of the upper chainring without getting a 2x9 specific derailleur, or is there more to it than that?

    do most of you go thru a few sets of chainrings before replacing the entire crankset? i don't ride nearly enough to destroy components in a single year, but i got this bike only a few weeks after moving to AZ, so i really dont have my own basis for a replacement times other than the stuff that wears out super-fast.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    i was also wondering how important rear-der pully teeth are to functionality, as mine are quite rounded. i will likely just get a new derailleur eventually. i had a brand new spare XTR one but i found out i cant use it because it is a rapid-rise and would completely reverse my gears

    Click image for larger version. 

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    and no,, i have never removed my cranks or dereailleur.
    You lost me at "chain slipping." Easy solution...
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  4. #4
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    I personally like to replace the chain, cassette, and rings at same time, as the parts like to wear together. The stretched chain may not 'fit' on the new rings. But if the chain and what not are recent enough, I cannot imagine that being an issue. The pulleys are not as much of an issue IMO. There really is no need to replace the crank unless an arm breaks, or bearings get smoked in the bottom bracket. You can just adjust the front derailleur to work for 2 rings. My bike came new as a 3x9, with bash installed, and big ring in the box. I hope some of this was helpful.
    “Think of bicycles as rideable art that can just about save the world.”
-Grant Petersen

  5. #5
    Meatbomb
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    Quote Originally Posted by Casual Observer View Post
    You lost me at "chain slipping." Easy solution...
    Mind filling us in?

  6. #6
    SamuraiBunnyGuy
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    the chain only has maybe 6 rides on it. i just changed it around halloween, and by mid november i was assdeep in xmas orders flooding in 24/7. I just got back on the bike for the first time 2 days ago.
    im gonna go with the 2-ring plus bash. (now i just need to decide blue or red)

  7. #7
    parenting for gnarness
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    Quote Originally Posted by longhairmike View Post
    the chain only has maybe 6 rides on it. i just changed it around halloween, and by mid november i was assdeep in xmas orders flooding in 24/7. I just got back on the bike for the first time 2 days ago.
    im gonna go with the 2-ring plus bash. (now i just need to decide blue or red)
    its not unusual for a new component in the drive train to lead to new problems. Rings can be replaced independently, you can go 2x9 with bash. If your chain is new, you should be good, and even if not chains are cheap. Cassette should be fine if it works with current chain. I would consider replacing derailleur or give it a thorough review - if its as worn as you say, the pulleys themselves probably need some love and it might have its share of hits. And imo replacing it along with the rest of the drivetrain is a good time for it. However, there is no single correct answer to this issue.

  8. #8
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    I agree with tysonnemb on replacing the chain, cassette and front sprockets at one time. If you've got a warn/stretched chain and you put it on a new sprocket or cassette that sprocket/cassette can wear quicker to match the chains stretch and vice-versa.

    I think you're fine on the jockey wheels.

    One other thing to check would be that your freehub isn't starting to go. Sometimes they will start going and it will cause the crank to feel like it is starting to skip. The front sprocket teeth have to be really, really warn down in order for the chain to skip over them...unless you're a complete monster.

    My freehub just started doing this a couple of rides ago. Feels just like the chain is skipping teeth. I happened to be at a stop and put a little pressure on the pedal and saw the whole set up move forward without the bike moving. Got a new freehub on the way. :-)

    DC

  9. #9
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo View Post
    Mind filling us in?
    Ditch the gears.
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  10. #10
    Meatbomb
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    All of them? Even a single speed has a chain and a gear that when worn out will slip. Easy solution?

  11. #11
    How much further ???
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    See image.

    questions on replacing just chainrings on a 3x9 crankset-2013-12-19_1536.png
    “Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did." Mark Twain

  12. #12
    SamuraiBunnyGuy
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    the old chain was skipping as well,, that was why i replaced it (after 26 months)

  13. #13
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Douger-1 View Post
    See image.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Ouch, that hurts. (But in this case, my recommendation is spot on.)
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo View Post
    Even a single speed has a chain and a gear that when worn out will slip.
    Nope.
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  15. #15
    Give it a crank
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    The best thing to do is to keep track of the mileage on each drivetrain component. If your riding is pretty regular, over time you'll figure out how much miles each component can handle for your riding style.

    Then it gets pretty simple, maybe something like what I've been getting:

    3 chains per cassette
    3 cassettes per chainring set
    2 chainring sets per BB
    2 BBs per bike frame
    Repeat with new bike

  16. #16
    Meatbomb
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    Quote Originally Posted by Casual Observer View Post
    Nope.


    no ?
    Last edited by Phillbo; 12-20-2013 at 08:06 AM.

  17. #17
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    I don't ride as much as a lot of you, but I have always heard (and learned) that changing the cassette and chain at the same time is the right thing to do. If you buy a new chain only, the old cassette wears out the chain too soon, and vice versa.

    Riding about 1500 miles per year, I replace the chain/cassette about once per year. I always keep an old chain handy to test for stretching. Half a link of stretch is the time to change.

    I have also "disabled" the large chainring in the manner you describe, replacing it with a bashguard. I had excellent results.

    DustyChap is correct about the freehub, too. It feels just like the chain is slipping. Only difference is a long, long walk home (if you lose the free hub). New free hub pawls are cheap and easy to replace.

  18. #18
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    questions on replacing just chainrings on a 3x9 crankset

    I like the sound of that
    Nobody gives a s#$t you singlespeed.

  19. #19
    No Clue Crew
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    Quote Originally Posted by Douger-1 View Post
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    I'm glad someone pointed that out...

    I was told by my guys at DNA that you'll replace your rings after every two, maybe three cassettes.

    My theory is now to change my chain WELL before I need to. Should stretch my cassette life out a bit since if the chain doesn't stretch as far the cogs (front and back) aren't able to be damaged by the no-so-stretched chain.

    I'll likely forget to change it, though...

  20. #20
    EDR
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    Re: questions on replacing just chainrings on a 3x9 crankset

    I just replaced my 22 tooth granny gear. It was skipping. It seems I have to replace that once a year. I must be a weenie. My middle rings last twice as long. And my cassette, probably 3 times as long.

  21. #21
    My other ride is your mom
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    I always replace the chain when I replace a cassette. Get a chain checker tool and use it with every cleaning. Jockey and pulley wheels are worn but still have life....you can replace just those if you want....no need for new r.der.

    Knowing that you only ride hawes and how you ride....you have no need for a bash guard, and your rings on your crank will last forever. Now put the dolls down and go ride somewhere else in this beautiful state!!!!!

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phillbo View Post
    Even a single speed has a chain and a gear that when worn out will slip.
    That's actually not true. You can run a chain on a singlespeed until the chain starts falling apart (the little roller things start falling off) without it ever slipping. Remember that an SS allows you to tension the chain. Also, you can run cogs and chainrings until they are in amazingly bad condition. I've done it and never had my chain skip.

  23. #23
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    You don't need to replace the derailleur to change the jockey wheels. Just buy these and change them out on the derailleur. Easy.
    Joe
    2003 KHS Alite 4000 26" Hardtail - XC, All mountain, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  24. #24
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    Don't worry about changing everything together. The chain cassette and rings don't wear together because all the sprockets are different sizes and the parts that make up your drive train are made of different materials. I would change the sprocket on your rear derailleur. If you go to the manufacturer website you can usually find the drawings and locate a part number. Your 22T is probably good as it looks like it is made of steel and doesn't look worn down at all. I would try a Shimano 32T from an SLX for your middle ring as they are made of steel and last a very long time. Like others have already mentioned, you can adjust your front der for a 2x9 setup no problem.

    It looks like you have a Shimano chain. Did you install it yourself? I just want to point out that you want to make sure you follow Shimano's directions when installing it. Some people don't know that there is a wrong way and it will drastically shorten the chains lifespan.
    Killing it with close inspection.

  25. #25
    'Tis but a scratch
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    I haven't seen it mentioned yet, but in order to change the chain-rings, you will still need to remove the crank-set. There is a special tool needed for that. You may either have a square tapered or splined type BB. Since I can't really tell by looking at that picture, I would suggest a universal puller. This is better anyways in case you have more than 1 bike with different bottom brackets.

    Park tool: Park Tool Co. » CWP-7 : Universal Crank Puller for Square Taper and Splined Cranks : Crank Tools

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