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  1. #1
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    Night riding with a dog?

    Does anyone ride at night with their dog? I want to be able to ride more at night but I don't always have a friend who's ready go so I was thinking that I've always wanted a dog to ride along with. Ive had dogs all my life but I've never had any that I could take with me mountain biking. I'm not concerned about training a dog to be a great trail dog but I am concerned with riding at night and running into the critters that come out at night (snakes mostly and visiblity for the dog. Anyone have any experience with any of this? Btw, most of the riding will be at Hawes if that helps...
    "You can become a very fast donkey, but you'll never be a thoroughbred..."

  2. #2
    My other ride is your mom
    Reputation: Maadjurguer's Avatar
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    As long as your dog won't chase after wildcats, javalina and coyotes or you can verbally hold them back....have at it....they see better than you do at night.

  3. #3
    Break it, Fix it, Ride it
    Reputation: Dag Nabbit's Avatar
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    Strap a Magic Shine to him and let'm go! My golden wouldn't even make it up Cardiac. He's more of an anaerobic athlete. Short sprints at 110%, mostly.
    Today's the day I eat bikes.

  4. #4
    parenting for gnarness
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    all the time, but good luck not getting them to chase wildlife, until they are too old to keep up with you.

  5. #5
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    I'd be very worried about snakes. There are some obedience classes out there that teach your dog to avoid snakes, instead of the usual sniffing and investigating which could end badly. Look into one of those to be safe

  6. #6
    Meatbomb
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    Attach one of those red blinky lights to his collar so you can locate him when he runs off.

  7. #7
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    ""

  8. #8
    Kathleen in AZ
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    See my tag line!! The right cattledog would be a fantastic and hardy trail dog - they are super smart, obedient, and dedicated to their owner(s). ACDR has about 30+ rescues in foster care across the state right now to choose from - the Petfinder list is not always up to date. PM me if you want more info!

  9. #9
    SamuraiBunnyGuy
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    i would recommend sticking to the traditional lights,, it's just too hard to strap a dog to your handlebars///

  10. #10
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    Snake bites on a dog are expensive, be careful

  11. #11
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    Thanks for the responses. Durtgirl, after I speak with the wife you will be contacted. I really like the idea of getting a rescued dog.
    "You can become a very fast donkey, but you'll never be a thoroughbred..."

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by homey View Post
    Thanks for the responses. Durtgirl, after I speak with the wife you will be contacted. I really like the idea of getting a rescued dog.
    best dawgs ever.

  13. #13
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    What ever dog you get, I highly suggest getting it snake trained. I took my wolf hybrid to a place off Cave Creek Rd just south of Carefree Hwy and by the middle of the session my dog was hiding behind the handler at the slightest hint of a snake. It's well worth it to know that your dog will not only alert you of a snake but also stay away themselves.

  14. #14
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    For those interested, here's the place that snake proofed my dog Snake proofing for dogs

  15. #15
    just 1 more
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    Quote Originally Posted by DurtGurl View Post
    See my tag line!! The right cattledog would be a fantastic and hardy trail dog - they are super smart, obedient, and dedicated to their owner(s). ACDR has about 30+ rescues in foster care across the state right now to choose from - the Petfinder list is not always up to date. PM me if you want more info!
    Couldn't agree more about an ACD, super dogs, BUT, they're meant to chase things down and round them up! Our 1.5 yr old is good with training but all bets are off if he sees a bunny or squirrel or lizard for that matter. It's bred into them. Could you even train an adult dog to stay close and not chase?

    We took him here for snake training:

    Snake proofing, snake training, rattlesnake avoidance training, Snake proofing for all breeds of dogs. New River, Arizona
    Last edited by azjeff; 09-07-2012 at 01:11 PM.
    something's missing..

  16. #16
    Kathleen in AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by azjeff View Post
    Couldn't agree more about an ACD, super dogs, BUT, they're meant to chase things down and round them up! Our 1.5 yr old is good with training but all bets are off if he sees a bunny or squirrel or lizard for that matter. It's bred into them. Could you even train an adult dog to stay close and not chase?
    Yup... One of my four cattledogs is a super biking partner who becomes compltely focused on me when off-leash on the trail (second from left in pic). other hikers? critters? She has eyes only for me. Now my other three dogs... the two older ones (left and right) could never keep up the pace of biking, but they are very good off leash while hiking and will come immediately if I call. They do not like to lose sight of me when hiking. At camp or in the front yard where there are lots of sniffs? Well, that's another story as they tend to wander off in search of garbage and food when I have nothing else for them to do... I have not had my youngest foster failure (2nd from right) out behind bikes yet, but I know she'd be fantastic if her short little legs could keep up... she never leaves my side and could care less about critters like bunnies or snakes etc. The point I'm trying to make is that there is a lot of variety in the breed... which is why getting an older rescue is a great thing because you will have a much better idea of knowing what kind of a dog you will get in the long run as compared to when getting a puppy


  17. #17
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    And, might I add, a tired cattle dog is a good cattle dog. Back when they were called Queensland Heelers I had a blue one. He went trail riding with me and the horse, rode next to my 10 speed, and didn't need a stinkin' leash (as he would say...)...but we used it when it was the law. We are planning to add one to our house at some point. But we are at our dog limit right now. But a cattle dog is loyal, smart, protective, and just plain funny! I love my current group, but can't wait to have a trail buddy that can keep up.

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