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Thread: mbaa today

  1. #1
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    mbaa today

    i was at the series opener today. i hate bragging but landon and i did really well today. it was his first real race and we both competed in sport class 19-29. the course couldnt have been in better shape. it was way fast, except for a few spots where the inevitable bog occurs. i ended up taking 3rd and about a minute behind me was landon for 4th. nice race today, kinda dont like the way they do the awards. took forever. how did everyone else do? i saw singlespeedcycip out there and a few other familiar faces

  2. #2
    mad aussie
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    I raced the marathon and was running in third place towards the end of the last long lap and feeling good when I realized my rear tire was flat. I made the mistake of running too low a pressure (32psi) and the tire had pinch flatted as I tried to pass traffic on the rocky downhill. I had also neglected to check my Stans sealant so the tire was basically dry. I have a reasonable lead over fourth so I quickly get the tire off and put in my spare tube, psssssss!, the tube was cracked right at the valve stem. That was pretty much the end of my race, dissapointing, but I have only myself to blame.
    One of my team mates was leading sport 40+ with a big lead before breaking a brand new chain, on the bright side the team had a win in Expert 19-39.
    Congratulations on the podium!

    Kevin

  3. #3
    Newbie...yeah that's it
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    Nice! I did my first race today, it was a lot of fun. I don't think I DFL'd but I didn't get a chance to stay and look, my wife brought the kids and they were gettin antsy. I know what I need to work on for the next race. I had a great time there were alot of people changing flats, I'm glad I ran my tires hard. The track was fast, figuring my first and only pre ride was the sunday before in the rain.

  4. #4
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    The back side of the long loop has to get alot of pinch flats going over the rocks. I was in no shape to race but went out and shook my cow bell. Looked like a good turn out and a good time.

    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Wombat
    I raced the marathon and was running in third place towards the end of the last long lap and feeling good when I realized my rear tire was flat. I made the mistake of running too low a pressure (32psi) and the tire had pinch flatted as I tried to pass traffic on the rocky downhill. I had also neglected to check my Stans sealant so the tire was basically dry. I have a reasonable lead over fourth so I quickly get the tire off and put in my spare tube, psssssss!, the tube was cracked right at the valve stem. That was pretty much the end of my race, dissapointing, but I have only myself to blame.
    One of my team mates was leading sport 40+ with a big lead before breaking a brand new chain, on the bright side the team had a win in Expert 19-39.
    Congratulations on the podium!

    Kevin

  5. #5
    my knees hurt
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    I raced Saturday also (advanced single speed), If you want to call what I did racing....finished 10th and suffered through all of it. The moral of the story....don't push too hard when being sick for the past 3 weeks....I guess I'll have to see how the next one goes, but damn those guys are fast....
    BELIEVE
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  6. #6
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    I raced as well . . . same situation. I have been sick with a flu,cold for the last several weeks and my performance was poor.

  7. #7
    workin' it Administrator
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    I think that a lot of the those flats could be attributed to poor passing ability much more than poor technical skill. I saw way too many of the sport class men acting like they were pro men and passing with haste and without forethought, including one going through a cactus, one into a large boulder and two that pinched directly in front of me in a very rocky area.

    A tip to all the sport men, if you are so fast that you need to jeopardize not only your chance of finishing but your chance of just finishing the pass, then you need to move up a class because you are sandbagging. It is much more challenging in the expert class and you won't need to pass all those rigid spinning singlespeeders.

    Also if you feel that someone is holding you up ask politely if they will let you by and then go when you are given the chance, your chances of getting a clean pass when you are an ass or demanding is much lower as most people especially those in other classes will not yield quite so easily nor be as forgiving in letting you have the good line.

    and finally if you are going to harangue about passing you better get by and not slow me down. This is especially important when passing a single speeder before a climb then downshifting and crawling up the climb causing me to get off my bike and walk. Very uncool.

    There got that off my chest.

    Otherwise the Singlespeed class has to be the most fun I have ever had racing in arizona MBAA series. I got to start with my wife. We rode together for awhile and she finished within minutes of me, showing us both how fast she really is.

    For a good time: race SS.
    Try this: HTFU

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockcrusher
    I think that a lot of the those flats could be attributed to poor passing ability much more than poor technical skill. I saw way too many of the sport class men acting like they were pro men and passing with haste and without forethought, including one going through a cactus, one into a large boulder and two that pinched directly in front of me in a very rocky area.

    A tip to all the sport men, if you are so fast that you need to jeopardize not only your chance of finishing but your chance of just finishing the pass, then you need to move up a class because you are sandbagging. It is much more challenging in the expert class and you won't need to pass all those rigid spinning singlespeeders.

    Also if you feel that someone is holding you up ask politely if they will let you by and then go when you are given the chance, your chances of getting a clean pass when you are an ass or demanding is much lower as most people especially those in other classes will not yield quite so easily nor be as forgiving in letting you have the good line.

    and finally if you are going to harangue about passing you better get by and not slow me down. This is especially important when passing a single speeder before a climb then downshifting and crawling up the climb causing me to get off my bike and walk. Very uncool.

    There got that off my chest.


    Otherwise the Singlespeed class has to be the most fun I have ever had racing in arizona MBAA series. I got to start with my wife. We rode together for awhile and she finished within minutes of me, showing us both how fast she really is.

    For a good time: race SS.
    i hear ya. i was in the first 15-20ish min of the race and we were about to hit the step and there was a hard right a few hundred feet before with a slight climb. 2 guys going for it and the left guy goes on the outside of the turn, taking a terrible line. then the guy in front follows the good line. causing the other one to fall, but they ended up falling into each other and both fell over. i just tooled around them and kept going. and not two min later at the step 2 guys decide to pass someone ON THE STEP and take outside lines around him. they were in too tough a gear and ended up falling into each other as well! again, me goine easily around them. my favorite part was how they gun it at the start and go as fast as they can and burn out at the venue where there are actual places to pass.

    i totally agree with you about passing, my .02 if someone is holding up a bunch of riders, he should let some pass, especially when asked nicely. i was stuck in a group of about 8 waiting behind someone (not SS) who was asked repeatedly to move over. we had people to catch for god sakes. finally at the venue we all were fresh from not riding hard and sprinted out ahead of the guy. i know he was probably really tired but if you dont know etiquite, go to beginner or read these forums.the best advice i got was from salty dog last year when i finished my first race and wanted to move up to sport. he told me i should probably do a season in beginner before i move up so i learn the "rules". now i know i passed a few single speeders. just to make you feel at ease and know im not one of those ass clowns who sacarafices themselves and their bikes for a pass that tires them out so much they cant climb, ill explain how i do things. whenever im coming up on a rider and i see that im going to pass i tell them whenever they feel ready ill go around. usually they let me go right then. sometimes i have to wait. if im nice to him then, then he might be nice to me when something happens to me. guys behind me trying to pass, i yell to them what class they are. if in mine, ill let them pass if they can, they have a small time to do so before i find the good line. it is a race after all, if someone cant pass me in a timely manner, then they will slow me down on a climb or something later. if they are in another class, especially one ahead of mine, they go around and sometimes i actually stop to let them. i know i can catch my group, but they need to be around me to catch theirs.
    my take on the whole thing. the start was definately different than anything ive ever done. the collegiate and singlespeeders were 2 min ahead of us so i know that we caught some of you guys, collegiate i think was passed by the entire sport podium. point being, we are the youngest group of sport men and we are going to ride fast. if someone has to ride that fast, they need to be schooled in being a nice guy out there, it is a race but it is for fun. my GF laughed when she heard of all the time money and training i devote to racing only to get a little medal. she doesnt get it. these guys are taking it way too seriously and are the reason why it can be a bad experience for some. i say watch out for your fellow rider wether being passed or passing so when the time comes for you to pass or be passed you dont have a new enemy, and the transition will be much better. wait till the next race! cant wait to see the crazies there.

  9. #9
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    This is my first year racing and did Sport class. My only complaint was that it was just too crowded. Too much passing, being passed, getting off the bike 'cause of congestion on SHORT climbs. Other than that, it was great!

    Does anyone know what the course is for MBAA #2 Sport Class. Obviously, Estrella but what loops and how many? MBAA doesn't have it posted yet.

    Thanks,

    Bondo

  10. #10
    President Skroob
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    I raced the beginner class, I think the first group out after the marathoners. In the first 4-5 miles of the long loop I must have stopped 5 times to let big groups go in front of me. I probably lost 2-3 minutes but I wasn't there to finish in the top 5. I ended up in the middle at 67 minutes which was a good time for me. That said, I did end up actually behind slow people who despite me asking nicely for room to pass staying in the dead center of the trail.

    I chalked it up to a crowded day on the trail.

  11. #11
    Legend in my own mind
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    Sport will probably do tech, long then tech. That was last years count.
    The older I get the faster I was . . .

  12. #12
    workin' it Administrator
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    A few comments

    Quote Originally Posted by GueroAZ
    I raced the beginner class, I think the first group out after the marathoners. In the first 4-5 miles of the long loop I must have stopped 5 times to let big groups go in front of me. I probably lost 2-3 minutes but I wasn't there to finish in the top 5. I ended up in the middle at 67 minutes which was a good time for me. That said, I did end up actually behind slow people who despite me asking nicely for room to pass staying in the dead center of the trail.

    I chalked it up to a crowded day on the trail.

    Actually I think that proper etiquette has the overtaking rider choosing when and where to overtake with the leading rider staying in the groove that they choose.

    I have seen some ugly accidents when the lead bike loses speed as they pull over and then falls into the passing rider. As a passing rider you are accelerating lessening your chances of losing control but as a slower rider you generally slow down when you yield to a passer and thus have a much greater chance of making a mistake and falling directly into an accelerating cyclist.

    Same reasoning as to the downhill yields to uphill right of way on trails. More speed = more control, less chance of accidents.

    The other tip for beginner racers is to preride the course (if possible) and determine where bottlenecks will be and prejudge those areas as possible bottlenecks and establish a strategy as to how to handle it. At my first race at Mcdowell many years ago I determined that the rock step (long loop) was going to be a bottleneck so I dismounted before threw my bike over my shoulder and ran past 10-15 bottlenecked racers. This race last weekend I determined that as a SS it would be easier to run up the tech climb and so I did and didn't lose any positions during that climb and was able to get on my bike with speed at the top to defend my position on the downhill.
    Last edited by rockcrusher; 01-29-2007 at 12:24 PM. Reason: grammar
    Try this: HTFU

  13. #13
    Newbie...yeah that's it
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    Quote Originally Posted by GueroAZ
    I raced the beginner class, I think the first group out after the marathoners. In the first 4-5 miles of the long loop I must have stopped 5 times to let big groups go in front of me. I probably lost 2-3 minutes but I wasn't there to finish in the top 5. I ended up in the middle at 67 minutes which was a good time for me. That said, I did end up actually behind slow people who despite me asking nicely for room to pass staying in the dead center of the trail.

    I chalked it up to a crowded day on the trail.
    I raced beginner too, was I the only one that found it disturbing that I had to walk almost every climb because the "group" in front of me couldn't make it up?? Hell I know I'm not that good of a rider yet, but at least I can ride all of the climbs out there, hell I did it in the rain on my pre-ride. And about the passing, I know I didn't do alot of it, but was passed alot more than I wanted to be, is there passing etiquite? I mean there were some horrible passes, to the point where I had to slow down, I don't think it was done maliciously but there could have been some more thought into it. Or is that just how the beginner class is??

  14. #14
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    For when you are passing it is generally understood that you will tell the lead rider that you are going to pass, on what side, and if possible where "rider, on your left, after this next cactus"

    usually the lead rider will say "OK" to that or may warn you off if the place you choose was poorly chosen "no, don't there is a downed cholla there"

    the lead rider can choose a nice open place andsay "go here, now" and slow a bit to force the pass or can just choose to sit and maintain pace and allow the rider to choose when they want to go.

    Bad riders will just go and this can be dangerous. You are in no way responsible for slowing for them nor yielding to them when they pass like that. Stay your line and keep at it.

    Generally I like to look ahead for a nice place to pass or go off trail memory, slow up a bit as I come to it, accelerate as the lead rider gets to it and just slingshot around on a side with a "rider come by fast on your left" as I go by. With this strategy you can jump by many cyclists at a time or just take advantage of slowing on climbs.

    The worst thing is getting stuck in a train. If you find yourself here plan a bold move like a dismount and run at a place that you know there will be a bottleneck or pass everytime you get a chance to get by one person and when you get to the front slow a bit to bunch them up and then give it for a minute or two. By bunching them you will slow the train, the lead rider will gap a bit but more than likely the lead rider is the slowest one since they are setting the pace of the train, and by giving it you give less of a chance for someone to get your wheel.
    Try this: HTFU

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