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  1. #1
    Fragile - must be Italian
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    Maiden voyage on my new 6point6

    Yesterday I met Jason (Chollaball) for some SoMo fun and brought out my new Iron Horse 6point for its maiden voyage. Ya...I bought it 2 weeks ago and yesterday was the first chance I had to put some mileage on it. Nothing like buying a bike...and then not getting to ride it because of 2 weeks of business travel.

    The bike is 100% out of the box...meaning it has the heavy ass DT-Swiss wheelset and 2.5 Maxxis Minion 2-ply tires. As it sits it weighs 36 lbs.

    Oh...it also has Crank Bros Acid pedals on it, which have that little Eggbeater-thingy inside the middle of a smallish platform pedal. I've never ridden Eggbeaters before...but I figured "how different can it be"? Boy was I wrong.

    We started our journey climbing up 24th/Mormon. Immediately it felt *really* strange having that 160mm Lyrik slack-angled pogo-stick poking out front. It made the front really tall...and hard to control. Plus the short-ish top tube combined with the really short 60mm stem made it hard to wrestle the nose of the bike down. My typical "sit and spin" method of getting up a climb on my 29'er Hei Hei was totally inappropriate.

    So....I dabbed...popped wheelies...and generally made a huge ass of myself as we climbed. To make matters worse, on 3 occasions my left foot got stuck in the eggbeater-thingy and would not release from the pedal, so down on my side I went with the bike in the air...putting a few nice scratches in the paint (yay!) and crunching my knee and elbow (boo).

    Plus, those 2.5 Minions were HEAVY. Wow. I could literally feel those suckers turning over and over.

    Towards the top I finally figured out how to best position my weight to keep the nose down yet still have enough traction in the rear. I have a feeling it will take some more practice on the bike to figure it out. Bottom line is that I cannot ride this bike uphill like I ride my other bikes. FWIW - the DW-Link suspension really does a nice job keeping the rear end bob free. It's just all those weird slack angles and added weight that threw me off.

    When we finally got to the top of Buena Vista and turned around, that is when the party started. Wow...can this sucker rail downhill. It's totally solid. On some of the stunts that make my other bikes shake and rattle...this thing just totally soaked it up. Even the waterfall felt like child's play.

    It's been a long time since I've ridden down to the 24th St parking lot on Mormon and the last times I never made it. This time I rode all the stunts (had to back up and retry on one when I crashed into the back of Jason)...and as I got closer to the bottom of the hill, I got into a groove with how the bike wanted to play and was rolling over everything like it was flat.

    All in all it was a very fun ride down but not so much fun going up. I am hoping that by replacing the crap wheelset with the Stans/Hopes I have on order and ditching those boat-anchor 2.5's with single-play 2.35's, I can lighten it up somewhat and still have plenty of DH prowess. I will save the 2.5's for the really gnarly stuff.

    I didn't take any pics of the bike before we started, but here's a pic of it when I originally assembled it. The only difference between then and now are the dozens of new scratches.

    Thx...Doug

  2. #2
    Just Joshin' ya!
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    Not that I am stalking you or anything, but I saw you just start the descent down Telegraph Pass on the Hei Hei (at least I think it was you) the other day as I was riding the road bike. I was wondering why the hell you weren't on the six point for that.

    Anyway, maybe it was someone else.
    What do we want? TIME TRAVEL! When do want it? THAT'S IRRELEVANT!

  3. #3
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    For an easier climb, try shuttle Wednesdays or Short bus Sundays.

  4. #4
    Fragile - must be Italian
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    Quote Originally Posted by NMPhi767
    Not that I am stalking you or anything, but I saw you just start the descent down Telegraph Pass on the Hei Hei (at least I think it was you) the other day as I was riding the road bike. I was wondering why the hell you weren't on the six point for that.

    Anyway, maybe it was someone else.
    Ya, that was me on the Hei Hei. People don't give it enough credit -- that bike can handle just about anything on South Mtn. It made it coast-to-coast on National and then down Telegraph just fine...well...with one exception (that multi-stair-step part in the middle of Telegraph...I dabbed there).

    I was riding alone that day so I figured it would be best NOT to bring a brand new bike that might need breaking in. Plus, the Hei Hei is the perfect "endurance all mountain" bike for a 4+ hour coast-to-coast-to-coast National trip (including the road ride back up). Riding the 6point up the road to get back to the top of National would not be fun.

    Thx...Doug

  5. #5
    I'm Lazy, So I Shuttle
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    Quote Originally Posted by tmarkos
    For an easier climb, try shuttle Wednesdays or Short bus Sundays.

    +1
    The secret to mountain biking is pretty simple. The slower you go the more likely it is you'll crash.- Julie Furtado

  6. #6
    parenting for gnarness
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greffster
    +1
    stop putting ideas in his head! this was the first climb in a looooooooooooong time I was able to beat Doug to the top (15 seconds counts, right ??!!!)



    Doug was definitely feeling it going down 24th, he got tired of waiting for me to find lines and sailed past after the really nasty s-curve.

  7. #7
    Kathleen in AZ
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    Where's the pic? It'll be nice to slow doug down on the uphills. But he'll get used to the geometry and soon will be flying up the hills on his new beast.

  8. #8
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    Glad to hear your enjoying the new rig.

    Although, I have to laugh when I read that 2.5 Minions are big and heavy, a Lyrik is long travel, and 36 lbs is a tank. My CoilAir weighs 39 easy, my old Karpiel was 55.
    Its all relative though, I'm sure this is a beast compared to the Hei Hei!
    Quote Originally Posted by azdog View Post
    I think he was born around the time of the Chernobyl fallout which would explain a lot.

  9. #9
    Fragile - must be Italian
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    Pics

    Duh - here's the pic I was supposed to have uploaded initially...

    The rest of the pics of the bike can be found in my original post:

    My new hooligan bike is here


    Thx...Doug
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #10
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    Welcome to the AM-world!

    Hah! Now you know what the rest of us AM riders are dealing with when pointed uphill.

    Personally, I don't have any issues. It is what it is. But since I've never had a 29'er or a pure
    XC bike, I know nothing better!

    BTW - I'd suggest a longer stem to tame the front a bit. I really think you'll like the difference.
    Find someone to loan you something to try...before you buy. Try a 100. I'm running a 120.


    PS - Don't give in to the shuttle! It's a one-way road to Slackersville. As a local here in Tucson
    (Vern) recently said, "Pedals are on a bike for a reason, and it isn't just for something to stand on."

    -- Evil Patrick

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  11. #11
    Fragile - must be Italian
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    Quote Originally Posted by KavuRider
    Glad to hear your enjoying the new rig.

    Although, I have to laugh when I read that 2.5 Minions are big and heavy, a Lyrik is long travel, and 36 lbs is a tank. My CoilAir weighs 39 easy, my old Karpiel was 55.
    Its all relative though, I'm sure this is a beast compared to the Hei Hei!
    Yes it's definitely all relative. My Motolite, which was my "big" bike before this, is 30 pounds soaking wet...has a 140mm fork that I could dial down to 100mm on the climbs (so I never had to deal with a long fork on climbs until now)...a 90mm stem...and 5" of rear travel with a teeny-weeny Fox RP23 shock. That bike has never seen a tire heavier than a 2.35 Kenda Nevegal on the front (what...maybe 750g??) and never anything bigger than a Kenda Small Block 8 on the rear. So going from that to the 6point with the dual-ply 2.5 setup (maybe 1400g each??) was huge.

    I think the biggest issue is the 160mm fork and 60mm stem. That combo is really freakish for me on the climbs...especially when I'm used to a 100mm fork + 90mm stem on the Hei Hei.

    And what's really a hoot is how weird I felt on the Motolite when I first bought that bike in 2007. At the time my only other bike was a Giant NRS with a 120mm stem and 80mm fork (72 HTA...long top tube). I will never forget my first ride on the Motolite - it felt like a slack sponge with a cramped cockpit. And now I think the Motolite rides hard and feels too stretched out for the fun stuff. I can't imagine what it would feel like if I had the chance to ride that old NRS again!

    Thx...Doug

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evil Patrick
    Welcome to the AM-world!


    BTW - I'd suggest a longer stem to tame the front a bit. I really think you'll like the difference.
    Find someone to loan you something to try...before you buy. Try a 100. I'm running a 120.


    PS - Don't give in to the shuttle! It's a one-way road to Slackersville. As a local here in Tucson
    (Vern) recently said, "Pedals are on a bike for a reason, and it isn't just for something to stand on."

    Don't believe the hype... The shuttles will help to stengthen you downhill game. Now that you have a new rig, you'll probably start taking harder lines with mucho more risk/gnar factor. Might as well hone those skills. You still have the rest of the week to pedal up.

    Oh, and I'd leave the shorter stem for now. You'll get used to climbing with it, and is much better for the return trip down. All a matter of personal preference I guess.
    It's only skin, it'll grow back!!

    Save the drama for your mama!!!

    Porkchop Sandwiches!

  13. #13
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    Oh, and congrats on the new ride BTW!
    It's only skin, it'll grow back!!

    Save the drama for your mama!!!

    Porkchop Sandwiches!

  14. #14
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by SPIDERS
    Don't believe the hype... The shuttles will help to stengthen you downhill game. Now that you have a new rig, you'll probably start taking harder lines with mucho more risk/gnar factor. Might as well hone those skills. You still have the rest of the week to pedal up.

    Oh, and I'd leave the shorter stem for now. You'll get used to climbing with it, and is much better for the return trip down. All a matter of personal preference I guess.

    Ain't no way around it; the strongest riders climb everything and pass on the shuttle rides.



    And since climbing is more important and takes more ride time than descending, the
    longer stem makes sense. Might as well be the most comfortable on the longest legs of
    the journey.

    -- Evil Patrick

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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evil Patrick
    Ain't no way around it; the strongest riders climb everything and pass on the shuttle rides.



    And since climbing is more important and takes more ride time than descending, the
    longer stem makes sense. Might as well be the most comfortable on the longest legs of
    the journey.


    Why turn your FR/DH bike into climbing machine? Might as well ride the other bike.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by tmarkos
    Why turn your FR/DH bike into climbing machine? Might as well ride the other bike.
    Easy question; it's not a FR/DH bike. It's an AM bike.

    And only the strongest riders enjoy the AM experience because it involves climbing on a
    heavier bike.

    Doug is a strong rider with great bike-handling skills; a perfect fit for AM.
    -- Evil Patrick

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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evil Patrick
    Easy question; it's not a FR/DH bike. It's an AM bike.

    And only the strongest riders enjoy the AM experience because it involves climbing on a
    heavier bike.

    Doug is a strong rider with great bike-handling skills; a perfect fit for AM.
    You are just trying so hard to start something, aren't you?

    Well, A for effort!
    Quote Originally Posted by azdog View Post
    I think he was born around the time of the Chernobyl fallout which would explain a lot.

  18. #18
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    The bike is 100% out of the box...meaning it has the heavy ass DT-Swiss wheelset and 2.5 Maxxis Minion 2-ply tires. As it sits it weighs 36 lbs.
    Plus, those 2.5 Minions were HEAVY. Wow. I could literally feel those suckers turning over and over.
    All in all it was a very fun ride down but not so much fun going up. I am hoping that by replacing the crap wheelset with the Stans/Hopes I have on order and ditching those boat-anchor 2.5's with single-play 2.35's, I can lighten it up somewhat and still have plenty of DH prowess. I will save the 2.5's for the really gnarly stuff.
    Are they the 3C compound DHFs? If so save them from for Bootleg or full shuttle runs, they are great tires and really expensive to replace, so don't wear them out while pedaling. Convert them to ghetto tubeless on the stock rims and you'll be rockin' the downhill.

    Wheels / Tires are the biggest improvement you can make on the 6 points or 7 points. I use my 7-point with light wheels as a XC bike when I'm traveling.

    My typical "sit and spin" method of getting up a climb on my 29'er Hei Hei was totally inappropriate.
    Never admit to being a roadie, or even imply you have roadie tendencies. You'll get used as a berm.

    Towards the top I finally figured out how to best position my weight to keep the nose down yet still have enough traction in the rear. I have a feeling it will take some more practice on the bike to figure it out. Bottom line is that I cannot ride this bike uphill like I ride my other bikes. FWIW - the DW-Link suspension really does a nice job keeping the rear end bob free. It's just all those weird slack angles and added weight that threw me off.
    Your 6-point will climb like a mo-fo, you'll quickly learn how to ride it for max traction during tech climbs:

    Shoulders and arms relaxed, head dropped towards the bar. Motocross trick- adjust your traction by lifting your head up a little to shift weight backwards, its amazing what a difference head position will make.

    (or you can cheat like I do and get a travel adjustable fork..)

    If at all possible resist putting a longer stem on the bike. A longer stem will make it way easier to climb, but it will also make it way tougher to manual. During those "oh sh1t" emergency moments (like when you go raging up to a 6' drop without realizing it is there) you'll be glad you have the shorter stem.

    The only difference between then and now are the dozens of new scratches.
    Welcome to the dark side.
    -MitchB

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by KavuRider
    You are just trying so hard to start something, aren't you?

    Well, A for effort!
    Finish, not "start".

    And it's "A for results" not "effort".

    -- Evil Patrick

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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evil Patrick
    Easy question; it's not a FR/DH bike. It's an AM bike.

    And only the strongest riders enjoy the AM experience because it involves climbing on a
    heavier bike.

    Doug is a strong rider with great bike-handling skills; a perfect fit for AM.
    DH/FR in application.
    To each his own. I prefer better handling, as that's what all super-strongest riders enjoy.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by mb300
    A longer stem will make it way easier to climb, but it will also make it way tougher to manual.
    So true, but as with anything, we learn to use the equipment we have.

    With these stronger legs, one pedal kick and a tug on the bars gets the nose up fast.
    -- Evil Patrick

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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by tmarkos
    DH/FR in application.
    To each his own. I prefer better handling, as that's what all super-strongest riders enjoy.

    Bravo to anyone that can win a DH race or FR competition on that bike.

    And a longer stem certainly provides better handling because you have more torque over
    not only the steering, but also in applying power to the bike.

    Next.
    -- Evil Patrick

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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evil Patrick
    So true, but as with anything, we learn to use the equipment we have.
    So are you saying he should go with a longer stem or learn to use the "equipment" it has??? I'm so confused! SHENANIGANS!
    It's only skin, it'll grow back!!

    Save the drama for your mama!!!

    Porkchop Sandwiches!

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Evil Patrick
    Bravo to anyone that can win a DH race or FR competition on that bike.


    Next.

    Thanks!

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by SPIDERS
    So are you saying he should go with a longer stem or learn to use the "equipment" it has??? I'm so confused! SHENANIGANS!
    Somehow, I'm not surprised that you're so easily confused. But I'm not here to hold your
    hand and guide you along. Sorry.

    You ride the short bus? ("short bus" is a shuttle, after all)
    -- Evil Patrick

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